Contact Information:
Franca Davenport
f.davenport@imperial.ac.uk
020-759-42198
Imperial College London



Kredyty mieszkaniowe Kredyty mieszkaniowe

Sprawdź aktualny ranking najlepszych kredytów mieszkaniowych w Polsce - atrakcyjne kredytowanie nieruchomości.

PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
FREE PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION
RSS - Press News Release
Add Press Release

New discovery gives hope that nerves could be repaired after spinal cord injury


2014-04-01
(Press-News.org) A new discovery suggests it could one day be possible to chemically reprogram and repair damaged nerves after spinal cord injury or brain trauma.

Researchers from Imperial College London and the Hertie Institute, University of Tuebingen have identified a possible mechanism for re-growing damaged nerve fibres in the central nervous system (CNS). This damage is currently irreparable, often leaving those who suffer spinal cord injury, stroke or brain trauma with serious impairments like loss of sensation and permanent paralysis.

Published in Nature Communications today, the research highlights the role of a protein called P300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF), which appears to be essential for the series of chemical and genetic events that allow nerves to regenerate. Regenerating nerve fibres is one of the best hopes for those suffering from CNS damage to recover.

When researchers injected PCAF into mice with damage to their central nervous system, this significantly increased the number of nerve fibres that grew back, indicating that it may be possible to chemically control the regeneration of nerves in the CNS.

"The results suggest that we may be able to target specific chemical changes to enhance the growth of nerves after injury to the central nervous system," said lead study author Professor Simone Di Giovanni, from Imperial College London's Department of Medicine. "The ultimate goal could be to develop a pharmaceutical method to trigger the nerves to grow and repair and to see some level of recovery in patients. We are excited about the potential of this work but the findings are preliminary.

"The next step is to see whether we can bring about some form of recovery of movement and function in mice after we have stimulated nerve growth through the mechanism we have identified. If this is successful, then there could be a move towards developing a drug and running clinical trials with people. We hope that our new work could one day help people to recover feeling and movement, but there are many hurdles to overcome first," he added.

The researchers were interested in understanding how axons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) make a vigorous effort to grow back when they are damaged, whereas CNS axons mount little or no effort. If damage occurs in the peripheral nervous system, which controls areas outside of the brain and spinal cord, about 30% of the nerves grow back and there is often recovery of movement and function. The researchers wanted to explore whether it was possible to generate a similar response in the CNS.

Co-author Dr Radhika Puttagunta from the University of Tuebingen said: "With this work we add another level of understanding into the specific mechanisms of how the body is able to regenerate in the PNS and have used this knowledge to drive regeneration where it is lacking in the CNS. We believe this will help further our understanding of mechanisms that could enhance regeneration and physical recovery after CNS injury."

To investigate the differences between how the two systems respond to damage, the researchers looked at mouse models and cells in culture. They compared the responses to PNS damage and CNS damage in a type of neuron called a dorsal root ganglion, which connects to both the CNS and the PNS.

They found that epigenetic mechanisms were at the core of this capacity to regenerate. Epigenetic mechanisms are processes that, without altering our DNA, manage to activate or deactivate genes in response to the environment. They normally take the form of chemical reactions and have been shown to control how genes influence diseases such as cancer and diabetes. However this is the first demonstration of a specific epigenetic mechanism responsible for nerve regeneration.

When nerves are damaged in the PNS, the damaged nerves send 'retrograde' signals back to the cell body to switch on an epigenetic program to initiate nerve growth. Very little was previously known about the mechanism which allows this 'switching on' to occur.

The researchers identified the sequence of chemical events that lead to the 'switching on' of the program to initiate nerve regrowth and pinpointed the protein PCAF as being central to the process. Furthermore when they injected PCAF into mice with damage to their central nervous system, there was a significant increase in the number of nerve fibres that grew back.

INFORMATION: The research was funded by the Hertie Foundation, the Wings for Life Spinal Cord Research Foundation and the German Research Foundation (DFG).

For more information please contact:

Franca Davenport
Research Media Officer
Imperial College London
Email: f.davenport@imperial.ac.uk
Tel: +44(0)20 7594 2198
Out of hours duty press officer: +44(0)7803 886 248

Notes to editors

1. Reference: R. Puttagunta et al. 'PCAF-dependent epigenetic changes promote axonal regeneration in the central nervous system', Nature Communications (2014), doi: 10.1038/n-comms4527.

2. About Imperial College London

Consistently rated amongst the world's best universities, Imperial College London is a science-based institution with a reputation for excellence in teaching and research that attracts 14,000 students and 6,000 staff of the highest international quality. Innovative research at the College explores the interface between science, medicine, engineering and business, delivering practical solutions that improve quality of life and the environment - underpinned by a dynamic enterprise culture.

Since its foundation in 1907, Imperial's contributions to society have included the discovery of penicillin, the development of holography and the foundations of fibre optics. This commitment to the application of research for the benefit of all continues today, with current focuses including interdisciplinary collaborations to improve global health, tackle climate change, develop sustainable sources of energy and address security challenges.

In 2007, Imperial College London and Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust formed the UK's first Academic Health Science Centre. This unique partnership aims to improve the quality of life of patients and populations by taking new discoveries and translating them into new therapies as quickly as possible.

Website: http://www.imperial.ac.uk

ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

Neuromonitoring with pulse-train stimulation for implantation of thoracic pedicle screws

2014-04-01
Charlottesville, VA (April 1, 2014). Researchers from Syracuse, New York, report a new, highly accurate, neuromonitoring method that can be used during thoracic spine surgery to prevent malpositioning of pedicle screws such that they enter the spinal canal and possibly cause postoperative neurological impairment. Findings of this prospective, blinded, and randomized study are reported and discussed in two companion papers published today online, ahead of print, in the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, specifically "Neuromonitoring with pulse-train stimulation for implantation ...

Child support in Tennessee paternity actions

2014-04-01
Child support in Tennessee paternity actions Article provided by Autry L. Jones, Attorney at Law Visit us at http://www.autryjones.com Tennessee law recognizes that both parents have legal duties to financially support their child, so when two parents do not live together, the law allows a Tennessee court to order child support. Child support arrangements usually involve one parent -- the one with whom the child does not live (or lives less) --paying money monthly to the custodial parent to help with the child's living expenses. While people think of child support ...

Medical marijuana bill progresses through Florida legislature

2014-04-01
Medical marijuana bill progresses through Florida legislature Article provided by Stanley E. Peacock, P.A. Visit us at http://www.stanpeacocklaw.com While a handful states have already decriminalized the recreational use of marijuana, others are still debating whether to approve the drug for medical purposes, including Florida. However, if one particular piece of Florida legislation eventually becomes law, medical marijuana may become a reality in the Sunshine State. Recently, House Bill 843 passed a Florida House Appropriations Committee by a vote of 24-0; meaning ...

Special rules for workers over age 50 who apply for disability benefits

2014-04-01
Special rules for workers over age 50 who apply for disability benefits Article provided by Law Offices of Judith S. Leland, APLC Visit us at http://www.disabilitylawfirm.com According to the Social Security Administration, more than 25 percent of today's 20-year-olds will be put out of work by a disabling condition before reaching the age of 67. A disability becomes more likely as workers age and their bodies become less resistant to injury and illness. Fortunately, for qualifying disabled workers who have paid enough into the system, compensation may be available ...

Male military spouses more likely to face divorce, but may lack support

2014-04-01
Male military spouses more likely to face divorce, but may lack support Article provided by Anthony C. Williams & Associates, PC Visit us at http://www.anthonywilliamslaw.com Today, women account for 15 percent of active duty U.S. military personnel. Married female armed service members are far more likely to divorce than their male counterparts. According to the Defense Department, the overall divorce rate in the military among both men and women was 3.4 percent in fiscal year 2013. But, 7.2 percent of women in the military reported a divorce during fiscal year ...

Norman Dovichi of Notre Dame to speak at Bioanalytical Sensors Mtg, May 22-23, 2014, Cambridge, MA.

2014-04-01
Norman Dovichi, Grace-Rupley Professor at the University of Notre Dame, to give a presentation titled "Zone Electrophoresis-Mass Spectrometry at the zeptomole level," at the Inaugural Bioanalytical Sensors Conference, May 22 & 23, 2014 in Cambridge, MA. Norman Dovichi received his BSc degree in Chemistry and Applied Mathematics from Northern Illinois University and his PhD in Analytical Chemistry from the University of Utah. He played a pioneering role in single molecule detection by laser-induced fluorescence. That experience led to the development of a high-throughput ...

Warriors Crowned CIHL Champions with RBC Asia Cup Victory

2014-04-01
The AsiaXPAT Kowloon Warriors have won their second CIHL championship title, with a 6-5 victory over the RBC South China Sharks in the final game of the 2013-2014 season. The Warriors, who entered the playoffs in last place but on a five-game winning streak, hoisted the RBC Asia Cup as the team became the first team to win two CIHL titles in Hong Kong's first full-contact elite ice hockey league. With the Warriors, who also won the title in the 2011-2012 season, facing off against the Sharks, the 2012-2013 champions, it was sure to be a thrilling game at Mega Ice in ...

Calvert Holdings, Inc. Announces Executive Management Changes

2014-04-01
Calvert Holdings, Inc. announced that Michael A. Recny, Ph.D., has been appointed Chief Executive Officer and has been elected a Director of the Company. He replaces Russ McLauchlan, who will become Executive Chairman and who will also now head the newly formed Executive Committee of Calvert Holdings, which will include Dr. Recny, Allan Reiss, President of Calvert Holdings, Inc., and Charles Spainhour, DVM, Ph.D, the Company's Chief Scientific Officer. Dr. Recny will also continue to serve as President of Calvert Research, LLC, which is the investment arm of Calvert Holdings. Of ...

National Love Our Children Day is Saturday, April 5th

2014-04-01
Love Our Children USA announces the 11th annual National Love Our Children Day. National Love Our Children Day is an initiative of Love Our Children USA, and is celebrated annually across the country on the first Saturday of every April to honor children, strengthen families and raise awareness for efforts to protect children. National Love Our Children Day is like Mother's and Father's Day for children. This special day was created to acknowledge the value of children and to educate parents on the importance of giving them love, protection and respect, the three essential ...

Sweet Cheeks All Natural Bath & Body Launches Indiegogo Campaign

2014-04-01
Sweet Cheeks All Natural Bath & Body, purveyors of all natural bath and body products, announced they have launched an Indiegogo campaign to expand operations. https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/sweet-cheeks-all-natural/x/4182441 Sweet Cheeks All Natural explained the reason for the campaign is to raise funds because they have outgrown their current location. Vanessa McCauley, owner, said that they have the space, they just need to raise funds to convert it to a production facility. "2013 was our tipping point. It was our ground swell year and we grew 10 times ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

How your brain decides blame and punishment -- and how it can be changed

Uniquely human brain region enables punishment decisions

Pinpointing punishment

Chapman University publishes research on attractiveness and mating

E-cigarettes: Special issue from Nicotine & Tobacco Research

Placental problems in early pregnancy associated with 5-fold increased risk of OB & fetal disorders

UT study: Invasive brood parasites a threat to native bird species

Criminals acquire guns through social connections

Restoring ocean health

Report: Cancer remains leading cause of death in US Hispanics

Twin study suggests genetic factors contribute to insomnia in adults

To be fragrant or not: Why do some male hairstreak butterflies lack scent organs?

International team discovers natural defense against HIV

Bolivian biodiversity observatory takes its first steps

Choice of college major influences lifetime earnings more than simply getting a degree

Dominant strain of drug-resistant MRSA decreases in hospitals, but persists in community

Synthetic biology needs robust safety mechanisms before real world application

US defense agencies increase investment in federal synthetic biology research

Robots help to map England's only deep-water Marine Conservation Zone

Mayo researchers identify protein -- may predict who will respond to PD-1 immunotherapy for melanoma

How much water do US fracking operations really use?

New approach to mammograms could improve reliability

The influence of citizen science grows despite some resistance

Unlocking secrets of how fossils form

What happens on the molecular level when smog gets into the lungs?

Using ultrasound to clean medical instruments

Platinum and iron oxide working together get the job done

Tiny silica particles could be used to repair damaged teeth, research shows

A quantum lab for everyone

No way? Charity's logo may influence perception of food in package

[Press-News.org] New discovery gives hope that nerves could be repaired after spinal cord injury
Press-News.org is a service of DragonFly Company. All Rights Reserved.
Issuers of news releases are solely responsible for the accuracy of their content.