Contact Information:

Media Contact

Aimee S. Bergquist
aimeesb@umich.edu
734-763-4660

Twitter: JAMA_current

http://www.jamamedia.org




Kredyty mieszkaniowe Kredyty mieszkaniowe

Sprawdź aktualny ranking najlepszych kredytów mieszkaniowych w Polsce - atrakcyjne kredytowanie nieruchomości.

PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
FREE PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION
RSS - Press News Release
Add Press Release

Metformin use associated with reduced risk of developing open-angle glaucoma


2015-05-28
(Press-News.org) Taking the medication metformin hydrochloride was associated with reduced risk of developing the sight-threatening disease open-angle glaucoma in people with diabetes, according to a study published online by JAMA Ophthalmology.

Medications that mimic caloric restriction such as metformin can reduce the risk of some late age-onset disease. It is unknown whether these caloric mimetic drugs affect the risk of age-associated eye diseases such as macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, cataract or glaucoma.

Researcher Julia E. Richards, Ph.D., of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and co-authors examined metformin use and the risk of open-angle glaucoma (OAG) using data from a large U.S. managed care network from 2001 through 2010.

Of 150,016 patients with diabetes, 5,893 (3.9 percent) developed OAG. Throughout the study period, 60,214 patients (40.1 percent) filled at least one metformin prescription; 46,505 (31 percent) filled at least one sulfonylurea prescription; 35,707 (23.8 percent) filled at least one thiazolidinedione prescription; 3,663 (2.4 percent) filled at least one meglitinide prescription; and 33,948 (22.6 percent) filled at least one insulin prescription. Some patients filled prescriptions for multiple medications.

Study results indicate that patients prescribed the highest amount of metformin (greater than 1,110 grams in two years) had a 25 percent reduced risk of OAG risk compared with those who took no metformin. Every one-gram increase in metformin was associated with a 0.16 percent reduction in OAG risk, which means that taking a standard dose of 2 grams of metformin per day for two years would result in a 20.8 percent reduction in risk of OAG.

'Although the impact of metformin on risk is known for some traits such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes and some specific cancers, this study points out the importance of understanding the potential impact of CR (caloric restriction) mimetic drugs on the risk of developing other medical conditions that affect older persons. It will also be important to elucidate the mechanisms of metformin action, at both the molecular and clinical level, in the ocular tissues involved in OAG pathology,' the study concludes.

INFORMATION:

(JAMA Ophthalmol. Published online May 28, 2015. doi:10.1001/jamaopthalmol.2015.1440. Available pre-embargo to the media at http://media.jamanetwork.com.)

Editor's Note: The authors made funding/support disclosures. Please see article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

To contact corresponding author Julia E. Richards, Ph.D., call:
Aimee S. Bergquist
aimeesb@umich.edu
734-763-4660

To place an electronic embedded link to this study in your story (link will be live at the embargo time): http://archopht.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?doi=10.1001/jamaophthalmology.2015.1440


ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

Hearing impairment higher among Hispanic/Latino men, older individuals

2015-05-28
Hearing impairment was more prevalent among men and older individuals in a study of U.S. Hispanic/Latino adults, according to a report published online by JAMA Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. Hearing impairment is a common chronic condition that affects adults. Hearing impairment may lead to lower quality of life and is associated with an increased risk for dementia. Most hearing impairment is undiagnosed and untreated. Karen J. Cruickshanks, Ph.D., of the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and co-authors determined the prevalence of hearing impairment among Hispanic/Latino ...

Nearly 1 in 7 Hispanic/Latino adults has some hearing loss

2015-05-28
This news release is available in Spanish. In the largest study to date of hearing loss among Hispanic/Latino adults in the United States, researchers have found that nearly 1 in 7 has hearing loss, a number similar to the general population prevalence. The analysis also looked at the differences between subgroups and found that Hispanics of Puerto Rican descent have the highest rate of hearing loss, while Mexican-Americans have the lowest. The study identified several potential risk factors for hearing loss, including age, gender, education level, income, noise exposure, ...

New cancer cases rise globally, but death rates are declining in many countries

2015-05-28
SEATTLE -- New cases of virtually all types of cancer are rising in countries globally - regardless of income - but the death rates from cancer are falling in many countries, according to a new analysis of 28 cancer groups in 188 countries. Thanks to prevention and treatment, progress has been made in fighting certain cancers, such as childhood leukemia. But researchers found that of all the cancers studied, there was just one - Hodgkin lymphoma - where the number of new cases dropped between 1990 and 2013. Over the same period, age-standardized death rates for all cancers ...

Walnut twig beetle's origin and spread revealed in genetic studies

Walnut twig beetles origin and spread revealed in genetic studies
2015-05-28
DAVIS, Calif. - Even though the walnut twig beetle (WTB) is likely native to Arizona, California, and New Mexico, it has become an invasive pest to economically and ecologically important walnut trees throughout much of the Western and into the Eastern United States. Through genetic testing, researchers from the Pacific Southwest Research Station (PSW) and partners from the University of California, Riverside and U.S. Forest Service Forest Health Protection have characterized the beetle's geographic distribution and range expansion. Results were recently published in the ...

Protecting women from multiple sclerosis

2015-05-28
CHICAGO --- An innocent mistake made by a graduate student in a Northwestern Medicine lab (she accidentally used male mice instead of female mice during an experiment) has led scientists to a novel discovery that offers new insight into why women are more likely than men to develop autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The finding, detailed in a paper published in The Journal of Immunology, focuses on a type of white blood cell, the innate lymphoid cell, that exhibits different immune activities in males versus females. MS is a disease that affects the ...

Acquiring 'perfect' pitch may be possible for some adults

2015-05-28
If you're a musician, this sounds too good to be true: University of Chicago psychologists have been able to train some adults to develop the prized musical ability of absolute pitch, and the training's effects last for months. Absolute pitch, commonly known as "perfect pitch," is the ability to identify a note by hearing it. The ability is considered remarkably rare, estimated to be less than one in 10,000 individuals. It has always been a very desired ability among musicians, especially since several famous composers, including Mozart, reportedly had it. The assumption ...

Ancient DNA may provide clues into how past environments affected ancient populations

2015-05-28
AUSTIN, Texas -- A new study by anthropologists from The University of Texas at Austin shows for the first time that epigenetic marks on DNA can be detected in a large number of ancient human remains, which may lead to further understanding about the effects of famine and disease in the ancient world. The field of epigenetics looks at chemical modifications to DNA, known as epigenetic marks, that influence which genes are expressed -- or turned on or off. Some epigenetic marks stay in place throughout a person's life, but others may be added or removed in response to ...

Ancient microbe-sediment systems of the barberton greenstone belt, South Africa

Ancient microbe-sediment systems of the barberton greenstone belt, South Africa
2015-05-28
Boulder, Colo., USA - The modern sedimentary environment contains a diversity of microbes that interact very closely with the sediments, sometimes to such an extent that they form "biosediments." But can such a phenomenon be fossilized? How far back in time can "biosedimentation" be traced? In this study for Geology, Frances Westall and colleagues examine some of the oldest rocks on Earth -- in the Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa (older than 3.3 billion years), to answer this question. Westall and colleagues use multi-scale methods to document the simultaneous ...

Not making enough money? Check your attitude

2015-05-28
WASHINGTON - Holding cynical beliefs about others may have a negative effect on your income according to research published by the American Psychological Association. "While previous research has associated cynicism with detrimental outcomes across a wide range of spheres of life, including physical health, psychological well-being and marital adjustment, the present research has established an association between cynicism and individual economic success," says Olga Stavrova, PhD, a research associate at the Institute of Sociology and Social Psychology, University of ...

Spinning a new version of silk

2015-05-28
CAMBRIDGE, Mass--After years of research decoding the complex structure and production of spider silk, researchers have now succeeded in producing samples of this exceptionally strong and resilient material in the laboratory. The new development could lead to a variety of biomedical materials -- from sutures to scaffolding for organ replacements -- made from synthesized silk with properties specifically tuned for their intended uses. The findings are published this week in the journal Nature Communications by MIT professor of civil and environmental engineering (CEE) ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

How your brain decides blame and punishment -- and how it can be changed

Uniquely human brain region enables punishment decisions

Pinpointing punishment

Chapman University publishes research on attractiveness and mating

E-cigarettes: Special issue from Nicotine & Tobacco Research

Placental problems in early pregnancy associated with 5-fold increased risk of OB & fetal disorders

UT study: Invasive brood parasites a threat to native bird species

Criminals acquire guns through social connections

Restoring ocean health

Report: Cancer remains leading cause of death in US Hispanics

Twin study suggests genetic factors contribute to insomnia in adults

To be fragrant or not: Why do some male hairstreak butterflies lack scent organs?

International team discovers natural defense against HIV

Bolivian biodiversity observatory takes its first steps

Choice of college major influences lifetime earnings more than simply getting a degree

Dominant strain of drug-resistant MRSA decreases in hospitals, but persists in community

Synthetic biology needs robust safety mechanisms before real world application

US defense agencies increase investment in federal synthetic biology research

Robots help to map England's only deep-water Marine Conservation Zone

Mayo researchers identify protein -- may predict who will respond to PD-1 immunotherapy for melanoma

How much water do US fracking operations really use?

New approach to mammograms could improve reliability

The influence of citizen science grows despite some resistance

Unlocking secrets of how fossils form

What happens on the molecular level when smog gets into the lungs?

Using ultrasound to clean medical instruments

Platinum and iron oxide working together get the job done

Tiny silica particles could be used to repair damaged teeth, research shows

A quantum lab for everyone

No way? Charity's logo may influence perception of food in package

[Press-News.org] Metformin use associated with reduced risk of developing open-angle glaucoma
Press-News.org is a service of DragonFly Company. All Rights Reserved.
Issuers of news releases are solely responsible for the accuracy of their content.