Contact Information:

Media Contact

Crys Ja
crystalj@unimelb.edu.au
61-434-367-449

Twitter: unimelb

http://www.unimelb.edu.au




Kredyty mieszkaniowe Kredyty mieszkaniowe

Sprawdź aktualny ranking najlepszych kredytów mieszkaniowych w Polsce - atrakcyjne kredytowanie nieruchomości.

PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
FREE PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION
RSS - Press News Release
Add Press Release

Elite tennis players feel the heat at Australian Open as summers intensify


2015-09-14
(Press-News.org) Melbourne summer temperatures have been steadily climbing over the past 25 years, but even more so during the two weeks of the Australian Open in late January, new data analysis reveals.

The average afternoon temperature in January has risen by 0.8 degrees Celsius per decade since 1987. But in the two weeks of the Australian Open - usually held in mid-late January - temperatures have increased by 1.25 degrees per decade.

Ben Hague, a third-year Atmosphere and Ocean Sciences student at the University of Melbourne, said extreme summer temperatures have also become more prevalent, like those experienced during the 2014 Australian Open.

Players, officials and spectators were forced to endure four straight days of temperatures over 41 degrees that year.

It is what motivated Mr Hague to analyse HtempMelbourne's weather data in detail.

"This was a particularly extreme event," Mr Hague said. "But the point of this study was to measure whether these events are happening more often."

"And the results suggest that they are."

Mr Hague found both hot days and measures of heat stress increased significantly over the whole summer, but mainly in January - and particularly, mid-late January.

The number of half-hourly observations where a temperature of 35 degrees or more was recorded in January has more than doubled. The data also suggests high summer temperatures are starting earlier.

The study focuses on temperature and humidity trends since 1987, which was when the Australian Open became a mid-to-late January event.

Mr Hague used temperature data from the Bureau of Meteorology, but also "wet bulb globe temperature" (WBGT) figures which take humidity, wind and sunlight into consideration.

The data suggests a decrease in relative humidity since 1987, but Mr Hague said it wasn't enough to counter an overall climb in the WBGT.

While the study doesn't make any future weather projections, the figures don't bode well for Australian Open organisers, who've previously come under fire over heatwave conditions in Melbourne.

The city is set to play host to the event until at least 2036. Other research has consistently pointed towards ever-climbing summer temperatures.

While the main focus of the study was on the 27 years since the Australian Open moved to mid-late January, Mr Hague also investigated more than 100 years of Melbourne summers.

The results reflect an overall increase of both maximum and minimum temperatures during the season.

He found that since 1911, average daily maximum temperatures throughout all of summer increased by two degrees - with 1.8 degrees of this warming having occurred since 1990.

Hotter days are also getting hotter, with the data showing a five degree increase in the average temperature of Melbourne's hottest December day since 1989.

Mr Hague's paper has been published in the latest edition of the Bulletin of the Australian Meteorological & Oceanographic Society.

Key findings:

Average afternoon temperature during January has increased 1.25 degrees per decade since 1987 Average daily temperature during January has increased 0.8 degrees per decade since 1987 There has been a doubling of the amount of time that the temperature has reached 35 degrees or more in January from 1987 to 2014 Melbourne's highest January temperature was on average 3.25 degrees higher between 1990 and 2014 Melbourne's highest December temperature was on average 4.88 degrees higher in the same period

INFORMATION:


ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

Does social capital explain community-level differences in organ donor designation?

2015-09-14
MEDFORD/SOMERVILLE, Mass. (Sept. 14, 2015)--A new study finds that the characteristics of one's community may be as important as individual factors on the decision to become an organ donor. The study, published in The Milbank Quarterly, shows an association between sociodemographic/social capital measures and organ donor registrations across 4,466 Massachusetts neighborhoods. In order to increase organ donation registrations, the research suggests that future health policies adopt a community-level focus. The shortage of organs for transplantation has reached unprecedented ...

World has lost 3 percent of its forests since 1990

2015-09-14
The globe's forests have shrunk by three per cent since 1990 - an area equivalent to the size of South Africa - despite significant improvements in conservation over the past decade. The UN's Global Forest Resources Assessment (GFRA) 2015 was released this week, revealing that while the pace of forest loss has slowed, the damage over the past 25 years has been considerable. Total forest area has declined by three per cent between 1990 and 2015 from 4,128 million hectares to 3,999 million hectares - a loss of 129 million hectares. Significantly, loss of natural forested ...

Alzheimer's-disease-related proteases control axonal guidance by regulating growth cone dynamics

2015-09-14
Alzheimer's-disease-related proteases, BACE1 and APH1B-y-secretase, control axonal guidance by regulating growth cone dynamics BACE1 is the major drug target for Alzheimer's disease, but we know surprisingly little about its normal function in the CNS. Soraia Barão and Bart De Strooper (VIB/KU Leuven) now show that this protease is critically involved in axonal guidance processes in thalamic and hippocampal neurons. An active membrane bound proteolytic CHL1 fragment is generated by BACE1 upon Sema3A binding. This fragment relays the Sema3A signal to the neuronal ...

Long sleep and high blood copper levels go hand in hand

2015-09-14
Persons sleeping less than 6 hours or more than 10 hours suffer from low-grade inflammation more often than persons sleeping 7-8 hours per night. This was observed in a University of Eastern Finland study focusing on the health and lifestyle habits among middle-aged men. "Earlier studies have found a relation between reduced sleep and low-grade inflammation," says Maria Luojus, MHSc, one of the study researchers. Furthermore, low-grade inflammation occurs in overweight, depression and diabetes. The study is the first to analyse the association between sleep duration ...

20-year follow-up of academic EORTC boost no-boost trial earns Best Abstract at ECC 2015

2015-09-14
Results of a 20-year follow-up of the academic EORTC 22881-10882 boost no-boost trial presented as a "Best Abstract" at the European Cancer Congress 2015 in Vienna show that young age, high-grade invasive tumor, and the presence of associated ductal carcinoma in situ were all factors increasing the local recurrence rate. An earlier analysis had already shown that young age and high-grade invasive carcinoma were the most important risk factors for local relapse in this trial conducted from 1989 to 1996. Dr. Conny Vrieling of the Clinique des Grangettes in Geneva, Switzerland, ...

Smokers at higher risk of losing their teeth, research shows

2015-09-14
A new study has confirmed that regular smokers have a significantly increased risk of tooth loss. Male smokers are up to 3.6 times more likely to lose their teeth than non-smokers, whereas female smokers were found to be 2.5 times more likely. The research, published in the Journal of Dental Research, is the output of a long-term longitudinal study of the EPIC Potsdam cohort in Germany carried out by researchers at the University of Birmingham and the German Institute of Human Nutrition. Tooth loss remains a major public health problem worldwide. In the UK, 15% of ...

Nutritional deficiencies common before weight loss surgery

2015-09-14
Malnutrition is a known complication of weight loss surgery, but findings from a small study by researchers at Johns Hopkins show many obese people may be malnourished before they undergo the procedure. "Our results highlight the often-overlooked paradox that abundance of food and good nutrition are not one and the same," says senior investigator Kimberley Steele, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. "Overweight and obese people can suffer from nutritional deficiencies, and those who care for them should be aware ...

An even more versatile optical chip

2015-09-14
Telecommunication networks will soon reach the physical limits of current technology and in order to overcome the current bottleneck, they will have to exploit the quantum properties of light. Roberto Morandotti and his INRS team are paving the way to this technological revolution by removing the technical barriers of quantum photonics through the use of their optical chips. Recently they directly generated cross-polarized (orthogonal) photon pairs on a chip, a first in quantum optics. Polarization will now be among the controllable parameters for harnessing light in a ...

Swinging on 'monkey bars': Motor proteins caught in the act

2015-09-14
The first images of motor proteins in action are published in the journal Nature Communications today. These proteins are vital to complex life, forming the transport infrastructure that allows different parts of cells to specialise in particular functions. Until now, the way they move has never been directly observed. Researchers at the University of Leeds and in Japan used electron microscopes to capture images of the largest type of motor protein, called dynein, during the act of stepping along its molecular track. Dr Stan Burgess, at the University of Leeds' ...

Elephants born when mothers are stressed age faster and produce fewer offspring

Elephants born when mothers are stressed age faster and produce fewer offspring
2015-09-14
Elephants born into stressful situations have fewer offspring and age faster, researchers at the University of Sheffield have found. Scientists discovered that Asian elephants born during times when their mothers experience highest stress levels produce significantly fewer offspring in their lifetime despite having higher rates of reproduction at an early age. The research team, from the University's Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, also found that those animals born under stress declined much more rapidly in older age, decades later. Lead author Dr Hannah ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

How your brain decides blame and punishment -- and how it can be changed

Uniquely human brain region enables punishment decisions

Pinpointing punishment

Chapman University publishes research on attractiveness and mating

E-cigarettes: Special issue from Nicotine & Tobacco Research

Placental problems in early pregnancy associated with 5-fold increased risk of OB & fetal disorders

UT study: Invasive brood parasites a threat to native bird species

Criminals acquire guns through social connections

Restoring ocean health

Report: Cancer remains leading cause of death in US Hispanics

Twin study suggests genetic factors contribute to insomnia in adults

To be fragrant or not: Why do some male hairstreak butterflies lack scent organs?

International team discovers natural defense against HIV

Bolivian biodiversity observatory takes its first steps

Choice of college major influences lifetime earnings more than simply getting a degree

Dominant strain of drug-resistant MRSA decreases in hospitals, but persists in community

Synthetic biology needs robust safety mechanisms before real world application

US defense agencies increase investment in federal synthetic biology research

Robots help to map England's only deep-water Marine Conservation Zone

Mayo researchers identify protein -- may predict who will respond to PD-1 immunotherapy for melanoma

How much water do US fracking operations really use?

New approach to mammograms could improve reliability

The influence of citizen science grows despite some resistance

Unlocking secrets of how fossils form

What happens on the molecular level when smog gets into the lungs?

Using ultrasound to clean medical instruments

Platinum and iron oxide working together get the job done

Tiny silica particles could be used to repair damaged teeth, research shows

A quantum lab for everyone

No way? Charity's logo may influence perception of food in package

[Press-News.org] Elite tennis players feel the heat at Australian Open as summers intensify
Press-News.org is a service of DragonFly Company. All Rights Reserved.
Issuers of news releases are solely responsible for the accuracy of their content.