Contact Information:
Marguerite Beck
marbeck@wakehealth.edu
336-716-2415
Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center



Kredyty mieszkaniowe Kredyty mieszkaniowe

Sprawdź aktualny ranking najlepszych kredytów mieszkaniowych w Polsce - atrakcyjne kredytowanie nieruchomości.

PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
FREE PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION
RSS - Press News Release
Add Press Release

Head hits can be reduced in youth football

Study shows limiting contact in practice makes difference


2013-07-29
(Press-News.org) WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. -- Less contact during practice could mean a lot less exposure to head injuries for young football players, according to researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center and Virginia Tech.

Their study of 50 youth-league players ages 9 to 12 -- the largest ever conducted to measure the effects of head impacts in youth football -- found that contact in practice, not games, was the most significant variable when the number and force of head hits incurred over the course of a season were measured. Numerous studies in this area have been done on high school and college players, but those findings do not necessarily apply to younger players.

Though more than 70 percent of the football players in the United States are under age 14, there is no clear, scientifically based understanding of the effect of repeated blows to the head in young players, said Steven Rowson, Ph.D., assistant professor at the Virginia Tech-Wake Forest University School of Biomedical Engineering and lead author of the study, which is published in the current online edition of the Annals of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences.

To quantify youth football players' exposure to head impacts in practices and games over the course of a single season, the researchers empoyed sensors in the helmets of 50 players on three teams in two different leagues.

The sensors were installed on an elastic base inside the helmet so that they remained in contact with the head throughout the duration of head impact, allowing for measurement of head acceleration rather than that of the helmet. Data from the sensors were transmitted wirelessly to a computer on the sideline and processed to measure both the linear and rotational head acceleration caused by each impact. All data were analyzed on an individual player basis and then averaged to represent the exposure level of a typical 9- to12-year-old football player.

The most important finding was that substantial differences existed among the three teams for both frequency and intensity of the impacts, Rowson said. For the entire season, players on team A experienced an average of 37 to 46 percent fewer impacts than players on teams B and C. For example, the average player on team A experienced 158 impacts during the season, compared to 294 and 251 on the other two teams.

This can be attributed to several factors, but the primary reason was that team A had fewer practices during the season than teams B and C, the study showed. During games, impact frequency and acceleration magnitudes were not significantly different among the teams.

In addition, team A competed in a league that had implemented Pop Warner rule changes, including a limit on contact during practice sessions. Teams B and C had no such restrictions.

Although the practice contacts were limited, there were no differences in the head acceleration magnitudes measured in the games between all three teams. The 95 percent head accelerations ranged from 41 g to 45 g for all three teams and were not significantly different. These data show that limiting contact in practices does not create an adverse effect in games.

"It is striking that you can cut head impacts for a player in half just by modifying practice, and it does not seem to change the game," said Alexander Powers, M.D., assistant professor of neurosurgery at Wake Forest Baptist and co-author of the study. "This may be very important in kids where brains are developing."

Coaching style also had a major influence on factors such as the types of drills used in practice and the plays called in games, which would likely contribute to the differences in the head impact exposure that players experienced, the authors reported.

"We hope that the findings will help improve the safety of youth football through rule changes to limit contact in practices, coach training and equipment design, especially in developing youth-specific helmets to better reduce accelerations from head impacts," Rowson said.

###

Funding for the study was provided by the Childress Institute for Pediatric Trauma, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the Virginia Tech-Wake Forest University School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences.

Co-authors are Jillian Urban, M.S., Joseph Maldjian, M.D., Christopher Whitlow, M.D., Alexander Powers, M.D., Joel Stitzel, Ph.D., Elizabeth Davenport, B.S., of Wake Forest Baptist; Stefan Duma, Ph.D., Steven Rowson, Ph.D., Bryan Cobb, M.S. of Virginia Tech. Note: B-roll of the study participants is available at http://www.wakehealth.edu/news/downloads

ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

Early exposure to insecticides gives amphibians higher tolerance later

2013-07-29
PITTSBURGH -- Amphibians exposed to insecticides early in life—even those not yet hatched—have a higher tolerance to those same insecticides later in life, according to a recent University of Pittsburgh study. Published in Evolutionary Applications, the Pitt study found that wood frog populations residing farther from agricultural fields are not very tolerant to a particular type of insecticide, but they can become more tolerant with early exposure. "This is the first study to show that tadpole tolerance to insecticides can be influenced by exposure to insecticides ...

Study predicts potential surge in medically-attended injuries

2013-07-29
New research from The Center for Injury Research and Prevention at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), signals that emergency and outpatient healthcare providers may need to prepare for higher demand for treatment among younger patients with mild and moderate injuries. As federal and state policies encouraging people to be covered by health insurance go into effect, researchers estimate the potential for more than 730,000 additional medically attended injuries annually, or a 6.1 percent increase if all currently uninsured children and young adults (ages 0-26) ...

Sharing the wealth with loyal workers

2013-07-29
EAST LANSING, Mich. — Workers who are loyal to their employers tend to be paid more, according to the first broad-scale study of worker loyalty and earnings. Michigan State University researchers surveyed 10,800 employees in former socialist countries that introduced capitalist economies in the 1990s. While previous research has found that worker loyalty bolsters companies' bottom lines by lowering labor turnover costs and enhanced customer service, this study shows that employees benefit as well – by making more money, said Susan Linz, lead author and professor of economics. "We ...

Video killed the interview star

2013-07-29
Hamilton, ON, July 29, 2013 – Job applicants interviewed through video conferencing come across as less likeable, a new study from the DeGroote School of Business at McMaster University has found. The study, conducted by Greg Sears and Haiyan Zhang when they were PhD students at DeGroote, shows that using video conferencing for job interviews disadvantages both employers and candidates. With use of video conferencing growing—in recent surveys 50% up to 65% of employers have reported using the technology for job interviews—the DeGroote study raises cautions about widespread ...

Global warming endangers South American water supply

2013-07-29
Tuesday, July 29: Chile and Argentina may face critical water storage issues due to rain-bearing westerly winds over South America's Patagonian Ice-Field to moving south as a result of global warming. A reconstruction of past changes in the North and Central Patagonian Ice-field, which plays a vital role in the hydrology of the region, has revealed the ice field had suddenly contracted around 15,000 years ago after a southerly migration of westerly winds. This migration of westerly winds towards the south pole has been observed again in modern times and is expected ...

NRL researchers discover novel material for cooling of electronic devices

2013-07-29
WASHINGTON-–A team of theoretical physicists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Boston College has identified cubic boron arsenide as a material with an extraordinarily high thermal conductivity and the potential to transfer heat more effectively from electronic devices than diamond, the best-known thermal conductor to date. As microelectronic devices become smaller, faster and more powerful, thermal management is becoming a critical challenge. This work provides new insight into the nature of thermal transport at a quantitative level and predicts a new material, ...

Prison reform results in strain on welfare system

2013-07-29
The burden of improved conditions in state prisons may be borne by welfare recipients, according to new research from Rice University and Louisiana State University. The study, "Intended and Unintended Consequences of Prison Reform" published online this month in the Journal of Law, Economics & Organization, examined the impact of federal court orders condemning prison crowding and the outcomes among states following these orders. The researchers found that court-mandated efforts by the federal government to improve living conditions in state prisons resulted in decreased ...

New American Chemical Society video on a real stinker: The corpse flower's odor

2013-07-29
WASHINGTON, July 29, 2013 — After six years of anticipation, that rock star of plants — a rainforest giant known as the corpse flower for its putrid odor — has bloomed here, and is the subject of a new video by the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society. It is available at http://www.bytesizescience.com. The video, produced by ACS Office of Public Affairs' award-winning Digital Services Unit, focuses on the chemical cocktail responsible for the offensive odor of the flower. More formally known as titan arum or Amorphophallus titanum, the ...

Study shows job training results in competitive employment for youth with autism

2013-07-29
A Virginia Commonwealth University study¹ shows intensive job training benefits youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), one of the most challenging disabilities in the world where only 20 percent find employment. Published in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, the study demonstrates that nine months of intensive internship training, in conjunction with an engaged hospital, can lead to high levels of competitive employment in areas such as cardiac care, wellness, ambulatory surgery and pediatric intensive care units. "This is the first study of its ...

NOAA-supported scientists find large Gulf dead zone, but smaller than predicted

2013-07-29
NOAA-supported scientists found a large Gulf of Mexico oxygen-free or hypoxic "dead" zone, but not as large as had been predicted. Measuring 5,840 square miles, an area the size of Connecticut, the 2013 Gulf dead zone indicates nutrients from the Mississippi River watershed are continuing to affect the nation's commercial and recreational marine resources in the Gulf. "A near-record area was expected because of wet spring conditions in the Mississippi watershed and the resultant high river flows which deliver large amounts of nutrients," said Nancy Rabalais, Ph.D. executive ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

A new quality control pathway in the cell

Small, fast, and crowded: Mammal traits amplify tick-borne illness

Curcumin, special peptides boost cancer-blocking PIAS3 to neutralize STAT3 in mesothelioma

A new way to prevent the spread of devastating diseases

LSU Health research discovers means to free immune system to destroy cancer

NASA sees western edge of Tropical Storm Fung-Wong affecting Philippines

Study provides insight about providing private mental health service to veterans

Benefits of telecommuting greater for some workers, study finds

Down syndrome helps researchers understand Alzheimer's disease

Research yields a game changer for improving understanding of Ebola and great apes

Single dose of antidepressant changes the brain

Gambling with confidence: Are you sure about that?

Stem cells use 'first aid kits' to repair damage

NYU Langone scientists report reliable and highly efficient method for making stem cells

The war on leukemia: How the battle for cell production could be decisive

NASA sees Hurricane Edouard enter cooler waters

Scientists find how mysterious 'circular RNA' is formed, claim muscular dystrophy link

Flu vaccine for expectant moms a top priority

New high-resolution satellite image analysis: 5 of 6 Syrian World Heritage sites 'exhibit significant damage'

NASA marks Polo for a hurricane

New Dartmouth smartphone app reveals users' mental health, performance, behavior

Fall foliage season may be later, but longer on warmer Earth

Want to link genes to complex traits? Start with more diversity

Americans rate losing eyesight as having greatest impact on their lives

Living in a disadvantaged neighborhood worsens musculoskeletal pain outcomes after trauma

Global agriculture: More land, fewer harvests

Withdrawal from the evolutionary race

Decision-support program helps keep seniors out of the emergency room

Language evolution: Quicker on the uptake

First eyewitness accounts of mystery volcanic eruption

[Press-News.org] Head hits can be reduced in youth football
Study shows limiting contact in practice makes difference
Press-News.org is a service of DragonFly Company. All Rights Reserved.
Issuers of news releases are solely responsible for the accuracy of their content.