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NPY and leptin receptor in the hypothalamus of rats with chronic immobilization stress

2013-07-24
(Press-News.org) A recent study entitled "Neuropeptide Y and leptin receptor expression in the hypothalamus of rats with chronic immobilization stress" showed that the body weight and food intake of rats subjected to chronic immobilization stress were significantly decreased; the expression of leptin receptor and the co-localization coeffient in these leptic receptor neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus were both upregulated, while the number of neuropeptide Y neurons was decreased. These findings which were in the Neural Regeneration Research (Vol. 8, No. 18, 2013) indicated that chronic immobilization stress induced high expression of leptin receptor in the arcuate nucleus and suppressed the synthesis and secretion of neuropeptide Y, thereby disrupting the pathways in the arcuate nucleus that regulate feeding behavior, resulting in diminished food intake and reduced body weight.



INFORMATION:

Article: " Neuropeptide Y and leptin receptor expression in the hypothalamus of rats with chronic immobilization stress," by Shaoxian Wang1, 2, Jiaxu Chen1, Guangxin Yue3, Minghua Bai1, Meijing Kou1, Zhongye Jin1 (1 School of Pre-clinical Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100029, China; 2 Traditional Chinese Medicine College of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhang 050000, Hebei Province, China; 3 Institute of Basic Theory in Chinese Medicine, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100700, China)

Wang SX, Chen JX, Yue GX, Bai MH, Kou MJ, Jin ZY. Neuropeptide Y and leptin receptor expression in the hypothalamus of rats with chronic immobilization stress. Neural Regen Res. 2013;8(18):1721-1726.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research
http://www.nrronline.org/

Full text: http://www.sjzsyj.org:8080/Jweb_sjzs/CN/article/downloadArticleFile.do?attachType=PDF&id=641



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[Press-News.org] NPY and leptin receptor in the hypothalamus of rats with chronic immobilization stress