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Xingnao Jieyu capsules are similar to fluoxetine for post-stroke depression

2013-08-14
(Press-News.org) The occurrence of post-stroke depression results from the effects of biological, psychological, and social factors, likely involving neurotransmitters, neuroendocrine effects, nerve anatomy, neurotrophic factors, neural regeneration, inflammatory reactions, and social psyche factors. Synaptotagmin promotes neurotransmitter release, regulates the transfer of synaptic vesicle to synaptic active zones, and is a key factor in information transfer among neurons. The Xingnao Jieyu capsule has been shown to effectively relieve neurologic impairments and lessen depression. It remains poorly understood whether this capsule can be used to treat post-stroke depression. Thus, Prof. Yongmei Yan and team from Shaanxi University of Chinese Medicine found that the Xingnao Jieyu capsules upregulated synaptotagmin expression in the hippocampi of rats with post-stroke depression, and improved depression symptoms. The therapeutic effects of Xingnao Jieyu capsules were similar to those of fluoxetine. These results, published in the Neural Regeneration Research (Vol. 8, No. 19, 2013), can provide scientific evidence and theoretical basis for pathogenesis and treatment of post-stroke depression.



INFORMATION:

Article: " The effects of Xingnao Jieyu capsules on post- stroke depression are similar to those of fluoxetine," by Yongmei Yan1, 2, Wentao Fan1, 2, Li Liu3, Ru Yang1, Wenjia Yang1 (1 Department of Encephalopathy, Affiliated Hospital of Shaanxi University of Chinese Medicine, Xianyang 712000, Shaanxi Province, China; 2 Encephalopathology Key Subject of Traditional Chinese Medicine, State Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine of the People's Republic of China, Xianyang 712000, Shaanxi Province, China; 3 Research Room of Traditional Chinese Medicine Internal Medicine, Shaanxi University of Chinese Medicine, Xianyang 712046, Shaanxi Province, China)

Yan YM, Fan WT, Liu L, Yang R, Yang WJ. The effects of Xingnao Jieyu capsules on post-stroke depression are similar to those of fluoxetine. Neural Regen Res. 2013;8(19):1765-1772.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research
http://www.nrronline.org/

Full text: http://www.sjzsyj.org:8080/Jweb_sjzs/CN/article/downloadArticleFile.do?attachType=PDF&id=647



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[Press-News.org] Xingnao Jieyu capsules are similar to fluoxetine for post-stroke depression