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Prostate cancer linked to obesity

An INRS team is investigating the relationship between body mass and the risk of developing cancer

Prostate cancer linked to obesity
2021-06-10
(Press-News.org) Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer among Canadian men and the third leading cause of cancer death. Abdominal obesity appears to be associated with a greater risk of developing aggressive prostate cancer. This link was demonstrated in a END

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Prostate cancer linked to obesity

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[Press-News.org] Prostate cancer linked to obesity
An INRS team is investigating the relationship between body mass and the risk of developing cancer