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Ambegaonkar studying physical & mental workload & recovery in collegiate dancers

2023-11-20
(Press-News.org)

Ambegaonkar Studying Physical & Mental Workload & Recovery In Collegiate Dancers 

Jatin Ambegaonkar, Professor, School of Kinesiology, received funding for the project: "Physical and mental workload and recovery in collegiate dancers." 

He and his collaborators, Kelley Wiese (PhD Student, CEHD – Kinesiology concentration) and Dr. Jena Hansen-Honeycutt (School of Dance, CVPA) aim to comprehensively assess the workload in collegiate dancers over the academic year.  

Specifically, they are examining objective physical activity demands and sleep quality in collegiate dance majors using wearable biosensors and examining subjective self-reported perceptions of physical and mental workload, fatigue, and sleep.

Study findings could highlight the importance of health care access to reduce injury risk and improve performance in this underserved population that has high physical and mental workloads. 

PhD student Wiese, mentored by Ambegaonkar, received $750 from the Virginia Athletic Trainers' Association for this project. Funding began in Sept. 2023 and will end in late Aug. 2024. 

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About George Mason University

George Mason University is Virginia's largest public research university. Located near Washington, D.C., Mason enrolls 38,000 students from 130 countries and all 50 states. Mason has grown rapidly over the last half-century and is recognized for its innovation and entrepreneurship, remarkable diversity and commitment to accessibility. Learn more at http://www.gmu.edu.

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[Press-News.org] Ambegaonkar studying physical & mental workload & recovery in collegiate dancers