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Ochsner Health named to Newsweek’s America’s Greatest Workplaces 2024 for Job Starters

This award recognizes Ochsner Health’s commitment to delivering excellence in healthcare in a supportive and inclusive environment, fostering innovation and professional growth

2024-03-28
(Press-News.org) NEW ORLEANS, La – Newsweek and Plant-A Insights Group have named Ochsner Health one of America's Greatest Workplaces for Job Starters in 2024. In a survey that included more than 75,000 young professionals and more than 540,000 company reviews, Ochsner earned 5 out of 5 stars. As the leading not-for-profit healthcare provider in the Gulf South, Ochsner is committed to championing career development among new professionals.

"We at Ochsner are honored to receive recognition as a place of employment that offers an exceptional foundation for job starters, reflecting our belief in nurturing talent and advocating for workforce development. Our commitment to excellence extends beyond patient care to how we mentor, support and offer career growth to our team members. We strive to create an environment that encourages professional well-being and success and that also enriches our community," said Tracey Schiro, executive vice president, chief people and culture officer, Ochsner Health.

By investing in the latest technology and offering continuous education and a culture of inclusivity, Ochsner is improving health outcomes in the communities it serves while ensuring a promising future for healthcare professionals joining the industry. Ochsner supports professional success through numerous programs offered to employees, including the Career Development Program, the Ochsner Learning Institute, a career center and employee resource groups such as the Young Professional Association. Additionally, Ochsner continues to invest in the future of healthcare through the creation of a workforce development program leading to career pathways in conjunction with universities and community colleges, including Delgado Community College, the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Xavier University of Louisiana, and The University of Queensland – Ochsner Health Medical School. 

"Getting a career started is never easy. First-day stumbling blocks can give way to larger questions about choosing the right path—and the right employer," said Newsweek Global Editor in Chief Nancy Cooper. "To help improve the job-finding process, Newsweek and Plant-A Insights are proud to introduce America's Greatest Workplaces 2024 for Job Starters, highlighting companies that outdo their peers when it comes to accommodating job starters and encouraging them to fill open roles."

Ochsner has previously been recognized by Newsweek this year for its excellence in the workplace, with inclusion on the lists of America's Greatest Workplaces for Women and America's Greatest Workplaces for Diversity for the second consecutive year.

For more information about Ochsner including career opportunities, visit www.ochsner.org.

 

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About Ochsner Health

Ochsner Health is the leading not-for-profit healthcare provider in the Gulf South, delivering expert care at its 46 hospitals and more than 370 health and urgent care centers. For 12 consecutive years, U.S. News & World Report has recognized Ochsner as the No. 1 hospital in Louisiana. Additionally, Ochsner Children’s has been recognized as the No. 1 hospital for kids in Louisiana for three consecutive years. Ochsner inspires healthier lives and stronger communities through a combination of standard-setting expertise, quality and connection not found anywhere else in the region. In 2023, Ochsner Health cared for more than 1.5 million people from every state in the nation and 65 countries. Ochsner’s workforce includes more than 38,000 dedicated team members and over 4,700 employed and affiliated physicians. To learn more about how Ochsner empowers people to get well and stay well, visit https://www.ochsner.org/.

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[Press-News.org] Ochsner Health named to Newsweek’s America’s Greatest Workplaces 2024 for Job Starters
This award recognizes Ochsner Health’s commitment to delivering excellence in healthcare in a supportive and inclusive environment, fostering innovation and professional growth