PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

Three renowned Argonne scientists accept joint appointments at the University of Houston

Joining forces to power a sustainable energy industry

Three renowned Argonne scientists accept joint appointments at the University of Houston
2024-03-29
(Press-News.org)

HOUSTON, March 29, 2024 – Three top researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory have accepted joint appointments in various capacities at the University of Houston. These appointments are part of the memorandum of understanding (MoU) Argonne signed recently with the Greater Houston Partnership. The MoU creates greater collaboration across academia, industry, private investors and government to accelerate and scale decarbonization efforts in the region, with the goal of achieving a net-zero emissions economy by 2050, according to an Argonne press release.

“This strategic collaboration leverages the combined strengths of Argonne and the University to further critical research efforts, public-private partnerships and educational opportunities for students in the energy transition and lead to transformational advancement of commercial scale energy industries,” said Ramanan Krishnamoorti, vice president for energy and innovation at UH.

Michael Wang, senior scientist and director of the Systems Assessment Center — Environmental Assessment Leader within Argonne’s Energy Systems and Infrastructure Analysis Division, is the inaugural Distinguished Senior Scholar at UH’s Energy Transition Institute (ETI).

A trailblazer in life-cycle analysis, Wang developed Argonne's widely utilized GREET (Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Technologies) model, which boasts over 60,000 registered users worldwide. It has influenced regulatory development and compliance in organizations such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

In his ETI role, Wang will foster collaborations between the Institute, energy companies and federal agencies. His key objectives include advancing research in decarbonizing the oil and gas sector through carbon management and transitioning to emerging energy technologies like hydrogen and renewable energy sources. He will also enhance the Institute’s analytic capabilities to provide comprehensive evaluations of energy technologies, policies and regulations.

Wang will conduct seminars and present invited class lectures in environmental sustainability, life cycle and techno-economic analysis of energy technologies, while helping Argonne to tap into the University’s talent pool, recruiting students for future opportunities.

“With more than 30 years of experience, Dr. Wang brings critical tools and expertise to the UH Energy Transition Institute, which is dedicated to unlocking the transformative potential within three critical domains: hydrogen, carbon management and circular plastics. These areas not only present opportunities for reshaping the energy sector but also stand as pillars for societal sustainable development and decarbonization,” said Joe Powell, founding executive director of ETI.

Zachary Hood, group leader and material scientist in Argonne’s Applied Materials Division (AMD), has accepted a joint appointment in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the UH Cullen College of Engineering. He will be hosted by Yan Yao, the Hugh Roy and Lillie Cranz Cullen Distinguished Professor and principal investigator at the Texas Center for Superconductivity.

Yao and his team are globally known for their research involving next-generation batteries using abundant, low-cost organic materials. Hood heads the Advanced Chemical Storage Group at Argonne, leading pioneering efforts in synthetic approaches for state-of-the-art solid-state materials. This collaboration aims to fast-track research on solid-state batteries, focusing on innovating manufacturing processes for battery components and establishing crucial foundations for future energy storage technologies.

Jianlin Li, manager of the Energy Storage and Conversion Department in AMD at Argonne, has a joint appointment in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Cullen College. His plans include establishing a dry room facility at UH and conducting research on emerging energy storage technologies, advanced electrode processing and cell manufacturing.

"This collaboration signifies a significant step towards bridging the gap between academia and industry to drive impactful change in the energy landscape," Krishnamoorti said. “We look forward to working with Argonne and Houston Energy Transition Initiative (HETI) to deliver an energy system that is affordable, reliable and sustainable for all.”

 

Caption for attached photo:

L to R: Scientists Michael Wang, Zachary Hood and Jianlin Li with Argonne and UH.

Photo Credit: University of Houston and Argonne National Lab

 

*** For more information, please contact Rashda Khan: rkhan20@uh.edu or (c)325-656-2824. **

 

END


[Attachments] See images for this press release:
Three renowned Argonne scientists accept joint appointments at the University of Houston Three renowned Argonne scientists accept joint appointments at the University of Houston 2

ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

High-resolution images reveal similarities in protein structures between Alzheimer’s disease and Down syndrome

2024-03-29
INDIANAPOLIS – More than 90% of people with Down syndrome, the most common chromosomal disorder in humans and the most frequent genetic cause of intellectual disability, are diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease by ages 55-60. A new study recently published in Nature Structural and Molecular Biology uses leading-edge cryo-electron microscopy imaging technology to determine whether differences exist between the protein structures in those with Alzheimer’s disease and those with both Alzheimer’s disease and Down syndrome. “Just like in Alzheimer’s disease, the neuropathological phenotype in those with ...

How blocking a neural receptor responsible for addiction could reduce alcohol use

2024-03-29
LA JOLLA, CA—Scripps Research scientists have found that LY2444296—a compound that selectively blocks the kappa opioid receptor (KOP)—may reduce drinking in cases of alcohol dependence in animal studies. The findings, which were published March 9, 2024, in Scientific Reports, could eventually inform new treatment options for people who experience alcohol use disorder (AUD). “Compounds designed to selectively block the KOP are very promising because this receptor is involved in a lot of mental illnesses, such as ...

Researchers discover skin biomarkers in infants that predict early development of food allergies

2024-03-29
DENVER — (MARCH 29, 2024) Food allergies occur often in childhood and can be severe or even fatal. Researchers at National Jewish Health are working to develop a program to prevent food allergies and have now identified early predictors of the condition.         During a recent study just published online in the March 2024 issue of the Journal of Allergy & Clinical Immunology, skin tape strips were collected from the forearms of newborns at the age of two months, an age before there ...

Researchers reveal evolutionary path of important proteins

Researchers reveal evolutionary path of important proteins
2024-03-29
New research from the University of Wisconsin–Madison decodes the evolutionary pathway of regulatory proteins, the molecules that help control gene expression. The findings from the Raman Lab in the Department of Biochemistry recently published their findings in the journal Cell Systems. Here’s a rundown on what they discovered: Proteins acquire and lose functions through evolutionary processes as cells adapt to changes in their environment over time. Protein evolution is well studied in certain enzymes but is understudied in regulatory proteins, which help control gene expression. A new, ...

Insilico Medicine presents progress of 5 novel AI cancer drugs at AACR

2024-03-29
Insilico Medicine (“Insilico”), a clinical-stage generative artificial intelligence (AI)-driven drug discovery company, today announced that five preclinical programs have been accepted as poster presentations in the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2024 (AACR 2024) happening April 5-10 in San Diego. Abstracts are now available on the AACR website. Insilico’s drug discovery efforts are driven by its validated and commercially viable AI drug discovery platform, Pharma.AI, ...

Study finds benefits in prescribing alcohol use disorder medications upon discharge from alcohol-related hospitalizations

2024-03-29
BOSTON – For adults hospitalized for alcohol-related reasons, receiving a prescription for an alcohol use disorder (AUD) medication at the time of discharge may lower their risk of return to hospital within 30 days of discharge, including emergency room visits and readmissions. That’s according to a recent study published in JAMA Network Open led by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the University of Pittsburgh. For the study, the investigators identified 9,834 alcohol-related hospitalizations among 6,794 Medicare Part D beneficiaries across the United States in 2016. Only 2.0% of hospitalizations involved filled ...

USC Schaeffer Center study finds few hospitals promoting potentially predatory medical payment products

2024-03-29
Fifty million Americans are on a financing plan to pay off medical or dental bills, with one-quarter of those bearing some interest. Increasingly, medical payment products (MPPs) – which include credit cards and loans administered by hospitals, physician practices, or third-party companies – have come under scrutiny by the Consumer Financial Protections Bureau, U.S. Department of Health & Human Services and the Treasury.  The agencies’ concern is that the products may be sidestepping a broad range of patient and consumer protections and inflating ...

Mandatory standards for the indoor environment would result in immense benefits to the health and productivity of people around the world

2024-03-29
This publication is a call to action for governments and agencies to develop, legislate and enforce IAQ standards. Boerstra: “Traditionally, governments have regulated outdoor air. But inhabitants of industrialized countries now spend more than 90% of their time indoors.” As a result, indoor pollutants have major consequences for our long-term health. Bluyssen: “For example, we now know that tiny airborne particles can pass directly from lungs to bloodstream, where they cause all kinds of diseases.” And indoor air is also a prime transmitter of pathogens, as demonstrated by the COVID-19 ...

Chickadees have unique neural “barcodes” for memories of stashing away food

Chickadees have unique neural “barcodes” for memories of stashing away food
2024-03-29
Your ability to remember and recall moments in time is important for recording life-defining moments and everyday information like where you parked the car. Now researchers reporting in the journal Cell on March 29 have new insight into how those episodic memories are encoded in the brain based on studies of how chickadees store food. Their study finds that chickadees activate unique neural patterns, which they liken to barcodes, each time they cache food in a certain spot. When they go back to retrieve that stored food, their brains light back ...

Chickadees are memory geniuses. Their barcode-like neural activity may be to thank

2024-03-29
NEW YORK, NY — Black-capped chickadees have extraordinary memories that can recall the locations of thousands of morsels of food to help them survive the winter. Now scientists at Columbia's Zuckerman Institute have discovered how the chickadees can remember so many details: they memorize each food location using brain cell activity akin to a barcode. These new findings may shed light on how the brain creates memories for the events that make up our lives. "We see the world through our memories of objects, places and people," said Dmitriy Aronov, PhD, a principal investigator at Columbia’s Zuckerman Institute and an ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

UK/Portuguese study strongly suggests antibiotic-resistant “superbugs” are being passed from cats and dogs to their owners

Researchers study effects of solvation and ion valency on metallopolymers

Physicists solve puzzle about ancient galaxy found by Webb telescope

Clear guidelines needed for synthetic data to ensure transparency, accountability and fairness study says

Report finds significant gender and racial inequities in the educational measurement profession

University of Houston and Scotland’s Heriot-Watt University forge strategic energy alliance

Rice team demonstrates miniature brain stimulator in humans

Jennifer Stinson receives prestigious Barer-Flood Prize in health services research

First insights into the genetic bottleneck characterizing early sheep husbandry in the Neolithic period

Theories that explain the crisis in democracy are inadequate for Latin America, experts say

Starving cells hijack protein transport stations

Where have all the right whales gone?

Researchers find no link between COVID-19 virus and development of asthma in children

Cell’s ‘garbage disposal’ may have another role: helping neurons near skin sense the environment

Study reveals potential to reverse lung fibrosis using the body’s own healing technique

International team co-led by a BSC researcher discovers more than 50 new deep-sea species in one of the most unexplored areas of the planet

Cleveland Innovation District partners exceeding many targets set by state and JobsOhio

A third of women experience migraines associated with menstruation, most commonly when premenopausal

MD Anderson Research Highlights for April 12, 2024

Soft Robotics appoints new Deputy Editor-in-Chief, Barbara Mazzolai, PhD

Wiley releases Mass Spectra of Designer Drugs 2024 to accelerate forensics analysis of fentanyls, cannabinoids, and more

Freestanding emergency departments are popular, but do they function as intended?

University of Cincinnati experts present at national neurology conference

Bonobos are more aggressive than previously thought

How seaweed became multicellular

Melanomas resist drugs by ‘breaking’ genes

Africa’s iconic flamingos threatened by rising lake levels, study shows

Vaccination timeliness among US children ages 0-19 months

Changes in permanent contraception procedures among young adults following the Dobbs decision

Semaglutide vs endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty for weight loss

[Press-News.org] Three renowned Argonne scientists accept joint appointments at the University of Houston
Joining forces to power a sustainable energy industry