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Ochsner Health nurses honored by the Louisiana State Nursing Association

2024-04-01
(Press-News.org) NEW ORLEANS, La – Ten Ochsner Health nurses have been named to Louisiana State Nursing Association’s (LSNA) inaugural “40 under 40” list. This award recognizes future leaders of nursing in Louisiana.

LSNA selected 40 outstanding nurse leaders 40 years of age and under who exemplify dedication to the nursing profession and demonstrate the qualities of a good leader.

"Nurses provide an indispensable role in delivering high quality healthcare to our communities. This recognition is well-deserved and a testament to each nurse’s commitment to excellence in administering compassionate care to their patients. At Ochsner, we applaud this achievement and extend a heartfelt congratulations to each honoree as their contributions to the medical field are shaping a healthier future,” said Tiffany Murdock, senior vice president, chief nursing officer, Ochsner Health.

The following Ochsner Health nurses have been included on the 40 under 40 list for 2024:

Alicia Augustine Bates, PhD, NP-C, CDCES, CNE, Ochsner Health Center – Denham Springs Allison Beard, BSN, RN, Ochsner School Nursing Brittany Hyatt, BSN, RN, CPN, St. Charles Parish Hospital Christina Grishman, MSN, RN Ochsner Health Kacey Christopher Wuertz, DNP, APRN, AGACNP-BC, CCRN, Ochsner Medical Center – New Orleans Kayla Rogers, BSN, RN, Ochsner Medical Center - Baton Rouge Mimi Gray, MSN, RN, CPN, Ochsner School Nursing Mohammed Rayyan, BSN, RN, Ochsner LSU Health Shreveport – Academic Medical Center Rachael Sood, BSN, MSN, RN, ANP-C, Ochsner Health Center - Metairie Crystal B. Risinger, BSN, RN, Ochsner Medical Center – West Bank Campus Preceding Nurses Week, the LSNA 40 under 40 Awards Ceremony will be held May 3 at Chateau Golf & Country Club in Kenner.

For more information about Ochsner Health visit www.ochsner.org.

 

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About Ochsner Health

Ochsner Health is the leading not-for-profit healthcare provider in the Gulf South, delivering expert care at its 46 hospitals and more than 370 health and urgent care centers. For 12 consecutive years, U.S. News & World Report has recognized Ochsner as the No. 1 hospital in Louisiana. Additionally, Ochsner Children’s has been recognized as the No. 1 hospital for kids in Louisiana for three consecutive years. Ochsner inspires healthier lives and stronger communities through a combination of standard-setting expertise, quality and connection not found anywhere else in the region. In 2023, Ochsner Health cared for more than 1.5 million people from every state in the nation and 65 countries. Ochsner’s workforce includes more than 38,000 dedicated team members and over 4,700 employed and affiliated physicians. To learn more about how Ochsner empowers people to get well and stay well, visit https://www.ochsner.org/.

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[Press-News.org] Ochsner Health nurses honored by the Louisiana State Nursing Association