PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

The importance of integrated therapies on cancer: Silibinin, an old and new molecule

The importance of integrated therapies on cancer: Silibinin, an old and new molecule
2024-05-28
(Press-News.org)

“This consideration could be the starting point to study whether Silibinin could contrast tumor progression, aging and inflammaging through molecular and cellular mechanisms [...].”

BUFFALO, NY- May 28, 2024 – A new review paper was published in Oncotarget's Volume 15 on May 23, 2024, entitled, “The importance of integrated therapies on cancer: Silibinin, an old and new molecule.”

In this new review, researchers Elisa Roca, Giuseppe Colloca, Fiorella Lombardo, Andrea Bellieni, Alessandra Cucinella, Giorgio Madonia, Licia Martinelli, Maria Elisa Damiani, Ilaria Zampieri, and Antonio Santo from Perderzoli Hospital and Fondazione Policlinico Universitario “A. Gemelli” begin their abstract by noting that the efficacy of coadjuvant molecules, in the landscape of cancer treatments, remains a focus of attention for clinical research with the aim of reducing toxicity and achieving better outcomes.

“Most of the pathogenetic processes causing tumour development, neoplastic progression, ageing, and increased toxicity involve inflammation.”

Inflammatory mechanisms can progress through a variety of molecular patterns. As is well known, the ageing process is determined by pathological pathways very similar and often parallel to those that cause cancer development. Among these complex mechanisms, inflammation is currently much studied and is often referred to in the geriatric field as ‘inflammaging’. In this context, treatments active in the management of inflammatory mechanisms could play a role as adjuvants to standard therapies.

Among these emerging molecules, Silibinin has demonstrated its anti-inflammatory properties in different neoplastic types, also in combination with chemotherapeutic agents. Moreover, this molecule could represent a breakthrough in the management of age-related processes. Thus, Silibinin could be a valuable adjuvant to reduce drug-related toxicity and increase therapeutic potential.

“For this reason, the main aim of this review is to collect and analyse data presented in the literature on the use of Silibinin, to better understand the mechanisms of the functioning of this molecule and its possible therapeutic role.”
 

Continue reading: DOI: https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.28587 

Correspondence to: Elisa Roca

Email: elisaroca@gmail.com 

Keywords: silibinin, anti-inflammatory, inflammation, toxicity, integrated therapy

Click here to sign up for free Altmetric alerts about this article.
 

About Oncotarget: Oncotarget (a primarily oncology-focused, peer-reviewed, open access journal) aims to maximize research impact through insightful peer-review; eliminate borders between specialties by linking different fields of oncology, cancer research and biomedical sciences; and foster application of basic and clinical science.

Oncotarget is indexed and archived by PubMed/Medline, PubMed Central, Scopus, EMBASE, META (Chan Zuckerberg Initiative) (2018-2022), and Dimensions (Digital Science).

To learn more about Oncotarget, visit Oncotarget.com and connect with us on social media:

X, formerly Twitter Facebook YouTube Instagram LinkedIn Pinterest Reddit Spotify, and available wherever you listen to podcasts

 

Click here to subscribe to Oncotarget publication updates.

For media inquiries, please contact media@impactjournals.com.

 

Oncotarget Journal Office

6666 East Quaker Street., Suite 1A

Orchard Park, NY 14127

Phone: 1-800-922-0957 (option 2)

###

END


[Attachments] See images for this press release:
The importance of integrated therapies on cancer: Silibinin, an old and new molecule The importance of integrated therapies on cancer: Silibinin, an old and new molecule 2

ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

Texas A&M-led team creates first global map of seafloor biodiversity activity

Texas A&M-led team creates first global map of seafloor biodiversity activity
2024-05-28
A pioneering study has used extensive global datasets and machine learning to map the activities of seafloor invertebrate animals, including worms, clams and shrimps, across the entire ocean, revealing for the first time critical factors that support and maintain the health of marine ecosystems. The international team, led by Texas A&M University and including investigators from Yale University and the University of Southampton, specifically focused on the unsung yet vital role burrowing animals play as "ecosystem engineers" in shaping nutrient ...

Light therapy increases brain connectivity following injury

Light therapy increases brain connectivity following injury
2024-05-28
OAK BROOK, Ill. – Low-level light therapy appears to affect healing in the brains of people who suffered significant brain injuries, according to a study published today in Radiology, a journal of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). Lights of different wavelengths have been studied for years for their wound-healing properties. Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) conducted low-level light therapy on 38 patients who had suffered moderate traumatic brain injury, an injury to the head serious enough to alter cognition and/or be visible on a brain scan. Patients received ...

Power imbalance in health care reveals impact of race and role on team dynamics and DEI efforts

2024-05-28
Background and Goal: Team-based care is considered the gold standard in delivery models. It uses integrated clinical teams with diverse skills and perspectives to provide efficient, high-quality health care services. Within these teams, individuals from minoritized racial-ethnic groups, often referred to as persons of color (POC), typically occupy roles with less authority (e.g., medical assistants), while white individuals more frequently hold positions of greater power (e.g., physicians). Few studies have explored the viewpoints of staff members in lower-power roles, who are disproportionately POC and constitute the majority of a health care team. This study aims to ...

NRG Oncology appoints new vice-chairs for their patient advocate committee

2024-05-28
NRG Oncology (NRG), a National Cancer Institute (NCI) National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) group focused on improving outcomes for adults with cancer through multi-center clinical research, recently announced two new Vice-Chairs to co-lead the NRG Patient Advocate Committee (PAC) alongside the current PAC Committee Chair, Dorothy Erlanger. Marlyn Molero, was appointed as Vice-Chair of the NRG PAC. Marlyn is a clinical researcher in the oncology area with Commonspirit Research Institute as well as a Spanish interpreter at Vituity. Marlyn brings a unique perspective to the NRG PAC leadership ...

Why do Dyeing poison frogs tap dance?

Why do Dyeing poison frogs tap dance?
2024-05-28
The toe tapping behavior of various amphibians has long attracted attention from researchers and pet owners. Despite being widely documented, the underlying functional role is poorly understood. In a new paper, researchers demonstrate that Dyeing poison frogs modulate their taps based on specific stimuli.  Dyeing poison frogs, Dendrobates tinctorius, have been shown to tap their posterior toes in response to a range of prey sizes, from small fruit flies to large crickets. In the present study, ...

UC Irvine study reveals circadian clock can be leveraged to enhance cancer immunotherapy

2024-05-28
Irvine, Calif., May 28, 2024 — A multidisciplinary research team at the University of California, Irvine has revealed that the circadian clock – the biological pacemaker that governs daily rhythms in physiological processes, including immune functions – can be leveraged to enhance the efficacy of checkpoint inhibitor cancer therapy. Checkpoint inhibitors block different proteins from binding to tumor cells, allowing the immune system’s T cells to kill the tumor.   The study, published online ...

Cell-targeting technology allows researchers to isolate neuronal subpopulations and link them to behavioral states

Cell-targeting technology allows researchers to isolate neuronal subpopulations and link them to behavioral states
2024-05-28
(MEMPHIS, Tenn. – May 27, 2024) As gene sequencing technologies become more powerful, our understanding of cellular diversity has grown in parallel. This led scientists at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital to create a tool to improve the ease and accuracy with which investigators can study specific subpopulations of cells. The tool, named Conditional Viral Expression by Ribozyme Guided Degradation (ConVERGD), allows researchers to specifically access these subgroups of cells and precisely manipulate ...

When should you neuter or spay your dog?

2024-05-28
Researchers at the University of California, Davis, have updated their guidelines on when to neuter 40 popular dog varieties by breed and sex. Their recent paper in Frontiers in Veterinary Science adds five breeds to a line of research that began in 2013 with a study that suggested that early neutering of golden retrievers puts them at increased risk of joint diseases and certain cancers. That initial study set off a flurry of debate about the best age to neuter other popular breeds. Professors Lynette and Benjamin Hart of the School of Veterinary Medicine, the study’s lead authors, set out to add more breed studies by examining more than a decade ...

Is it a sound of music…or of speech? Scientists uncover how our brains try to tell the difference

2024-05-28
Music and speech are among the most frequent types of sounds we hear. But how do we identify what we think are differences between the two?  An international team of researchers mapped out this process through a series of experiments—yielding insights that offer a potential means to optimize therapeutic programs that use music to regain the ability to speak in addressing aphasia. This language disorder  afflicts more than 1 in 300 Americans each year, including Wendy Williams and Bruce Willis. “Although music and speech are different in many ways, ranging from pitch to timbre to sound texture, ...

New test rapidly diagnoses Toxoplasma infections and reduces false positives

2024-05-28
An inexpensive, accurate test that detects infections with the parasite Toxoplasma gondii can provide results within 30 minutes from a finger-prick in a doctor’s office or within an hour from a small blood sample tested in a local medical laboratory. The new test can also identify false positives in other types of commercial diagnostic tests for toxoplasmosis, providing swift reassurance to uninfected pregnant women and their doctors and facilitating timely interventions to protect a fetus against toxoplasmosis in acutely infected pregnant mothers. These findings appear in a study, led by toxoplasmosis specialist Rima McLeod, MD, ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

Discovery of spontaneous inflow and outflow states of high-temperature plasma by energetic ions

Tax the rich, say a majority of adults across 17 G20 countries surveyed

Semaglutide leads to greater weight loss in women than men with HF, improves HF symptoms in both sexes

12.5, the 1st Impact Factor of COMMTR released!

Circadian clock impact on cluster headaches funded by $2.4M NIH grant for UTHealth Houston research

Study identifies first drug therapy for sleep apnea

How old is your bone marrow?

Boosting biodiversity without hurting local economies

ChatGPT is biased against resumes with credentials that imply a disability — but it can improve

Simple test for flu could improve diagnosis and surveillance

UT Health San Antonio researcher awarded five-year, $2.53 million NIH grant to study alcohol-assisted liver disease

Giving pre-med students hands-on clinical training

CAMH research suggests potential targets for prevention and early identification of psychotic disorders

Mapping the heart to prevent damage caused by a heart attack

Study challenges popular idea that Easter islanders committed ‘ecocide’

Chilling discovery: Study reveals evolution of human cold and menthol sensing protein, offering hope for future non-addictive pain therapies.

Elena Beccalli, new rector of Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, takes office on 1st July

Pacific Northwest Research Institute uncovers hidden DNA mechanisms of rare genetic diseases

Empowering older adults: Wearable tech made easier with personalized support

Pennington Biomedical researchers partner on award-winning Long Covid study

Cooling ‘blood oranges’ could make them even healthier – a bonus for consumers

Body image and overall health found important to the sexual health of older gay men, according to new studies

Lab-grown muscles reveal mysteries of rare muscle diseases

Primary hepatic angiosarcoma: Treatment options for a rare tumor

Research finds causal evidence tying cerebral small-vessel disease to Alzheimer’s, dementia

Navigating the Pyrocene: Recent Cell Press papers on managing fire risk

Restoring the Great Salt Lake would have environmental justice as well as ecological benefits

Cannabis, tobacco use, and COVID-19 outcomes

A 5:2 intermittent fasting meal replacement diet and glycemic control for adults with diabetes

Scientists document self-propelling oxygen decline in the oceans

[Press-News.org] The importance of integrated therapies on cancer: Silibinin, an old and new molecule