PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

UT Arlington increases interdisciplinary grants by 40% in 2024

Seven multidisciplinary teams receive one-year awards to facilitate research

UT Arlington increases interdisciplinary grants by 40% in 2024
2024-07-09
(Press-News.org) The Office of the Vice President for Research and Innovation at The University of Texas at Arlington has awarded seven Interdisciplinary Research Program (IRP) grants totaling nearly $140,000 to foster collaboration between groups that do not typically work together. This represents an increase in funding of 40% over the grants awarded in 2023.

“UT Arlington has increased its support of interdisciplinary research as we know that many of today’s great societal challenges can only be solved when innovators with various types expertise come together,” said Kate C. Miller, vice president for research and innovation. “Many federal, state and private funding agencies also recognize the importance multidisciplinary research, and that’s why so many have integrated approaches at the core of their missions. UTA’s support of collaborative research will have an impact on society today while also making these projects more viable for additional research collaboration.”

The 2024 recipients of the IRP grants are:

Architecture Assistant Professor Mahmoud Bayat, public affairs and planning Professor Jianling Li, civil engineering Professor Stephen P. Mattingly, landscape architecture and public affairs and planning Professor Qisheng Pan, and civil engineering Professor Mohsen Shahandashti for their project “Leveraging AI and Digital Twins for Enhancing Resilience of Transportation Networks.” Managing aging infrastructure, like bridges and roads, is a critical issue in the United States. With this project, the team is developing a new approach that uses virtual models of objects called “digital twins” and artificial intelligence (AI) to create a dynamic model of transportation networks to optimize maintenance. The solution will allow transportation agencies to better allocate resources, reduce the time and costs associated with bridge assessments, and improve the overall management and resilience of transportation assets. Bioengineering Professor Khosrow Behbehani and psychology Professor Tracy Greer for their project “Assessing the Validity of Wearable Heart Rate Variability Data as a Potential Tool to Assist in Pain Management.” Exercise is an important component of pain management, but post-exercise discomfort can keep individuals from engaging in it. Researchers have found that tracking the time between heartbeats (called heart rate variability or HRV) on wrist-worn wearable devices may help guide treatment and improve exercise tolerance. This research will test whether wearables are a valid measurement tool for HRV and if HRV is an important related outcome of pain management. Biology Associate Professor Jeffrey P. Demuth, biology Assistant Professor Theodora Koromila and computer science and engineering Assistant Professor Jacob Luber for their project “Single-Cell Multi-Omics of Sex Chromosome Gene Regulation.” Differences in DNA and gene content between X and Y sex chromosomes in males affect gene regulation and chromosome segregation during sperm development. This project will examine the natural variation in sex chromosomes using advanced computational analysis, ultra-high-resolution microscopy, and single-cell sequencing to reveal mechanisms underlying sex chromosome dynamics throughout spermatogenesis. The team’s development of multi-omics tools (an approach that looks at many layers of biological data) for single-cell analyses will inform the causes of fertility decline and sex differences in disease prevalence. Communication Assistant Professor Grace Brannon; industrial, manufacturing, and systems engineering Associate Professor Shouyi Wang; and kinesiology Assistant Professor Liao Yue for their project “A Mixed Methods Approach to Leverage Machine Learning in the Development of Personalized mHealth Physical Activity Interventions.” Studies have shown the health benefits of physical activity, but it’s challenging to start and maintain a workout schedule. In this project, researchers will use machine learning to predict how a person's blood sugar level corresponds to daily activity levels. With that data, they will then create an exercise plan so individuals can see how their daily activity levels affect their health, with the goal of motivating individuals to stay physically active. Kinesiology Professor Paul J. Fadel, art and art history Senior Lecturer Benjamin C. Wagley and UTARI Principal Research Science Muthu Wijesundara for their project “Assessment of Engagement and Cardiovascular Responses in Individuals with a Mobility Disability Using an Adaptive Exergame Machine for Increasing Physical Activity.” Although regular exercise helps people with mobility issues avoid additional health problems, lack of specialized exercise equipment for people with disabilities can sideline these individuals. This project focuses on the use of an adaptive exergame machine, a type of accessible exercise equipment with a video game component that keeps users engaged in exercise while monitoring their activity and providing feedback. The team will use the data from this study to identify areas of improvement so this adaptive equipment can be expanded for more widespread use. Modern languages Associate Professor Alicia R. Rueda-Acedo, social work Associate Professor of Practice Karla Arenas-Itotia, social work Assistant Professor Jaclyn Kirsch, and College of Nursing and Health Innovation Assistant Dean of Simulation and Technology Jennifer Roye for their project “Increasing Access to Health Services for Limited English Proficiency Patients Using Simulation-Based Learning: A Pilot Study.” People with limited English-speaking skills often have difficulty accessing health care services due to the language barrier. In this project, researchers will compare the use of family members vs. trained medical interpreters when preparing limited-English-speaking patients for hospital discharge. The results of the program will be circulated to help health professionals improve outcomes for people with limited English. Physics and bioengineering Associate Professor Yujie Chi and nursing, biology, bioengineering and kinesiology Professor Zui Pain for their project “Comprehensive Characterization of Low-Dose Radiation Effects on Cardiomyocytes: Dose-Responses and Molecular Mechanisms.” Researchers know a lot about the damage caused by large amounts of radiation, such as from a nuclear explosion, but there is little known about any health problems caused by small amounts of radiation, such as radiation emitted from X-rays or going through security gates. This team will perform advanced biological measurements and radiation modeling using a unique radiation and cardiac experimental system. They hope to identify early biomarkers for heart problems caused by small amounts of radiation—the first step to identifying any risks and possible health interventions. The goal of the IRP grants is to advance interdisciplinary research at UTA in alignment with the University’s strategic plan to be recognized as an international leader in research, scholarship and innovation. Each project lasts one year in duration. At the end of the year, recipients are expected to submit applications for additional funding outside the University with the aim of further developing their findings.

END

[Attachments] See images for this press release:
UT Arlington increases interdisciplinary grants by 40% in 2024 UT Arlington increases interdisciplinary grants by 40% in 2024 2

ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

MIT researchers introduce generative AI for databases

2024-07-09
CAMBRIDGE, MA — A new tool makes it easier for database users to perform complicated statistical analyses of tabular data without the need to know what is going on behind the scenes. GenSQL, a generative AI system for databases, could help users make predictions, detect anomalies, guess missing values, fix errors, or generate synthetic data with just a few keystrokes. For instance, if the system were used to analyze medical data from a patient who has always had high blood pressure, it could catch a blood pressure reading that ...

Exponentially increasing understanding of early life on Earth

Exponentially increasing understanding of early life on Earth
2024-07-09
Despite decades of research, there’s still much scholars don’t understand about life’s beginnings and early evolution. A UC Riverside paper has opened the door to understanding more and to framing future studies that could help predict climate change and search for life beyond Earth.   “This paper strives to inform the Earth sciences community where the research needs to go next,” said Christopher Tino, a UCR PhD candidate during the time of research and a first author. Many studies have explored signs ...

New method could yield fast, cross-country quantum network

New method could yield fast, cross-country quantum network
2024-07-09
Quantum computers offer powerful ways to improve cybersecurity, communications, and data processing, among other fields. To realize these full benefits, however, multiple quantum computers need to be connected to build quantum networks or a quantum internet. Scientists have struggled to come up with practical methods of building such networks, which must transmit quantum information over long distances. Now, researchers at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering (PME) have proposed a new approach — building long quantum channels using vacuum sealed tubes ...

Aging retinal pigmented epithelium: Omics-based insights into vision decline

Aging retinal pigmented epithelium: Omics-based insights into vision decline
2024-07-09
“These findings potentially support employing anti-aging therapies such as senolytic pharmacologic compounds to prevent or ameliorate progression to AMD [...]” BUFFALO, NY- July 9, 2024 – A new editorial paper was published in Aging (listed by MEDLINE/PubMed as "Aging (Albany NY)" and "Aging-US" by Web of Science) Volume 16, Issue 12, entitled, “Aging retinal pigmented epithelium: omics-based insights into vision decline.” In this new editorial, researchers Ioan V. Matei and Luminita Paraoan from ...

Public health researchers detail way forward post-pandemic

2024-07-09
AURORA, Colo. (July 9, 2024) – In the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic, the U.S. public health system must focus on critical questions of accountability, politicization and updating data systems if it is to do its job well and maintain the trust of the American people, according to a new report from the Colorado School of Public Health. The report, authored by Professor Jonathan Samet, MD, MS, of the Colorado School of Public Health and Professor Ross Brownson, PhD, of Washington University in St. Louis, was published recently in the journal Health Affairs. In ...

Improving 'health span' through slowing age-related cognitive decline

Improving health span through slowing age-related cognitive decline
2024-07-09
Two University of Oklahoma researchers have been awarded more than $2 million in grants from the Hevolution Foundation to further their studies on age-related cognitive impairment, with an emphasis on improving “health span,” or the number of years a person remains healthy. While modern medicine can help extend a person’s life span, researchers are increasingly studying ways to increase their healthy years of life. Because the process of aging increases the risk for memory problems and dementia, researchers must understand why as a first step toward delaying cognitive issues until later in life. The Hevolution Foundation ...

Globally significant upwelling is driven by topographical features on seafloor

2024-07-09
Irvine, Calif., July 9, 2024 – Exactly how the turbulent mixing of ocean water relates to global overturning circulation has been little understood by oceanographers, but an international research team, including an Earth system scientist at the University of California, Irvine, has found that bumpy topographical features along the sloping ocean floor contribute significantly to ocean seawater upwelling.   In a paper published recently in Nature, the researchers describe a “vigorous near-bottom upwelling” that results in the upward transition of water from denser to lighter ocean layers at a rate ...

Dolls and trucks: Political right and left share some parenting beliefs

2024-07-09
Key takeaways Virtually all study respondents on the political left and more than 75% on the right supported allowing children to play with both traditionally “girl” and “boy” toys. Those on both sides of the political spectrum also supported the idea that girls should be able to aspire to traditionally male pursuits. However, while most left-wing activists supported the idea of a child living in a way that does not align with their birth sex, most right-wing activists rejected the idea. Society appears deeply divided on how to parent with regard to gender. For example, some parents throw “gender reveal” ...

Delaying diabetes with diet and exercise for 4 years results in better long-term health

Delaying diabetes with diet and exercise for 4 years results in better long-term health
2024-07-09
Individuals diagnosed with prediabetes can reduce their long-term risk of death and diabetes-related health complications if they delay the onset of diabetes for just four years through diet and exercise. Guangwei Li of the China-Japan Friendship Hospital and colleagues report these findings in a new study published July 9th in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine. Type 2 diabetes is associated with an increased risk of death and disability, and imposes a significant economic burden on individuals and societies worldwide. Lifestyle changes, such as eating a healthy diet and getting more exercise, can delay or reduce the risk of developing diabetes in people ...

Global database reveals large gaps in our knowledge of four-footed animals

Global database reveals large gaps in our knowledge of four-footed animals
2024-07-09
Researchers developed TetrapodTraits – a global database of animals with four feet – which can now be applied for better ecology, evolution and conservation research. Mario Moura of the Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Brazil, and Walter Jetz of Yale University, US, published this work on July 9th in the open-access journal PLOS Biology. Tetrapods, which include amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals, are generally well-documented species, which makes them useful as models in global biodiversity studies. However, gaps in our knowledge about many of these species, data inconsistencies and shifting scientific names can lead to biased conclusions about biodiversity. To help ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

Generative AI tools like Pix2Pix–BicycleGAN are revolutionizing landscape design by enhancing masterplan generation and rendering

Expanding APAC presence, Insilico Medicine seals strategic collaboration on AI-driven mash therapy development with Korean Biotech Therasid Bioscience

When it comes to butterflies, people prefer pretty ones. That’s a problem for scientists.

UBC Okanagan study raises concerns about partner violence in queer relationships

Human-infecting parasite produces sterile soldiers like ants and termites

The unintended consequences of success against malaria

Taco-shaped arthropod from Royal Ontario Museum’s Burgess Shale fossils gives new insights into the history of the first mandibulates

Butterflies accumulate enough static electricity to attract pollen without contact, new research finds

Eyes for Love: Searching for light and a mate in the deep, dark sea, male dragonfishes grow larger eyes than the females they seek

PNNL scientists tap nation’s fastest computers to explore critical science questions

Peri-operative care of transgender and gender-diverse individuals: new guidance for clinicians and departments published

Clinical psychologist’s book addresses largely ignored problem: social anxiety

Researchers leveraging AI to train (robotic) dogs to respond to their masters

Drawing water from dry air

Combining trapped atoms and photonics for new quantum devices

A new way to make element 116 opens the door to heavier atoms

New genetic tool could identify drug targets for diseases associated with metabolic dysfunction

Plant Biologist Siobhan Brady named HHMI Investigator

Long-acting injectable cabotegravir for HIV prevention is safe in pregnancy

Large language models don’t behave like people, even though we may expect them to

NREL researchers highlight opportunities for manufacturing perovskite solar panels with a long-term vision

Top Medicare advantage plans less available in disadvantaged areas

Better carbon storage better carbon storage with stacked geology with stacked geology

Sharp temperature reduction for quantum dots in polymer by highly efficient heat dissipation pathways

UAF researcher creates way to detect elusive volcanic vibrations

Lissajous pattern multi-pass cell: Enhancing high sensitivity and simultaneous dual-gas LITES sensing

Asexual reproduction usually leads to a lack of genetic diversity. Not for these ants.

Mini lungs make major COVID-19 discoveries possible

Exploratory analysis associates HIV drug abacavir with elevated cardiovascular disease risk in large global trial

Control of light–matter interactions in two-dimensional materials with nanoparticle-on-mirror structures

[Press-News.org] UT Arlington increases interdisciplinary grants by 40% in 2024
Seven multidisciplinary teams receive one-year awards to facilitate research