PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

Why does a high-fat diet induce preeclampsia-like symptoms in pregnant rats?

2013-08-08
(Press-News.org) Preeclampsia is a relatively common pregnancy disorder, characterized by primary hypertension and proteinuria. In patients with severe preeclampsia, eclampsia can develop, causing nervous system symptoms and signs. In the clinic, some patients with preeclampsia suffer from eclampsia even with minimal blood pressure changes. Thus, the pathogenesis of hypertensive encephalopathy cannot fully explain the epilepsy-like attacks in eclampsia patients. We know that changes in neurotransmitter levels in the brain play an important role in epilepsy-like attacks. A recent study published in the Neural Regeneration Research (Vol. 8, No. 20, 2013) fed pregnant rats with a high-fat diet for 20 days. Thus, these pregnant rats experienced preeclampsia-like syndromes such as hypertension and proteinuria. Simultaneously, metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 mRNA and protein expressions were upregulated in the rat hippocampus. These findings indicate that increased expression of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 promotes the occurrence of high-fat diet-induced preeclampsia in pregnant rats. Therefore, the control of fat intake is significant for the prevention of pregnancy-induced eclampsia.

###Article: " Why does a high-fat diet induce preeclampsia-like symptoms in pregnant rats?," by Jing Ge1, 2, Jun Wang2, Dan Xue3, Zhengsheng Zhu4, Zhenyu Chen3, Xiaoqiu Li2, Dongfeng Su5, Juan Du1(1 Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110000, Liaoning Province, China; 2 The General Hospital of Shenyang Military Region, Shenyang 110016, Liaoning Province, China; 3 Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, People's Liberation Army No. 202 Hosiptal, Shenyang 110003, Liaoning Province, China; 4 Dantu District Sanitary Supervision Institute, Zhenjiang 212001, Jiangsu Provicne, China; 5 Department of Neurology, the 463 Hospital of Chinese PLA, Shenyang 110042, Liaoning Province, China)

Ge J, Wang J, Xue D, Zhu ZS, Chen ZY, Li XQ, Su DF, Du J. Why does a high-fat diet induce preeclampsia-like symptoms in pregnant rats? Neural Regen Res. 2013;8(20):1872-1880.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research
http://www.nrronline.org/ Full text: http://www.sjzsyj.org:8080/Jweb_sjzs/CN/article/downloadArticleFile.do?attachType=PDF&id=658


ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

Oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage and neurodegenerative diseases

2013-08-08
Oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Oxidative stress is characterized by the overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which can induce mitochondrial DNA mutations, damage the mitochondrial respiratory chain, alter membrane permeability, and influence Ca2+ homeostasis and mitochondrial defense systems. All these changes are implicated in the development of these neurodegenerative diseases, mediating ...

Our brains can (unconsciously) save us from temptation

2013-08-08
PHILADELPHIA (August 5, 2013) – Inhibitory self control – not picking up a cigarette, not having a second drink, not spending when we should be saving – can operate without our awareness or intention. That was the finding by scientists at the University of Pennsylvania's Annenberg School for Communication and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. They demonstrated through neuroscience research that inaction-related words in our environment can unconsciously influence our self-control. Although we may mindlessly eat cookies at a party, stopping ourselves from ...

'Digging up' 4-billion-year-old fossil protein structures to reveal how they evolved

2013-08-08
Modern proteins exhibit an impressive degree of structural diversity, which has been well characterized, but very little is known about how and when over the course of evolution 3D protein structures arose. In a study published by Cell Press August 8 in Structure, researchers resurrected 4-billion-year-old Precambrian proteins in the laboratory and gained novel insights into protein evolution by analyzing their X-ray crystal structures. This method has revealed a remarkable degree of structural similarity among proteins since life first evolved on this planet, and it represents ...

JCI early table of contents for Aug. 8, 2013

2013-08-08
Engineered rice protects against rotavirus For children and immune compromised adults in developing countries, diarrheal disease induced by rotavirus can be life threatening. Current rotaviral vaccines are highly effective in the Western world, but are not as effective in developing countries. Additionally, these vaccines are not appropriate for use outside of a very narrow age window or in immune compromised individuals. In the current issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation Yoshikazu Yuki and colleagues at the University of Tokyo report the development of ...

Engineered rice protects against rotavirus infection

2013-08-08
TITLE: Rice-based oral antibody fragment prophylaxis and therapy against rotavirus infection AUTHOR CONTACT: Daisuke Tokuhara The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, UNK, JPN Phone: 81-3-5449-5271; Fax: 81-3-5449-5411; E-mail: tokuhara@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp View this article at: http://www.jci.org/articles/view/70266?key=de80321a713532149b56 END ...

Tumor microenvironment allows cancer cells to hide from the immune system

2013-08-08
Cancer progression is aided by the ability of tumors to evade recognition by the immune system. In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Gerard Blobe and colleagues at Duke University identify a mechanism by which tumors evade detection. Using mouse models of breast cancer and melanoma, they show that loss of the Type III TGF-β receptor (TGFBR3) in tumors promotes cancer progression by altering signaling in tumor-associated immune cells. This study supports the use of TGF-β inhibitors to enhance the efficacy of therapies that promote immune-mediated ...

Genetic analysis reveals historic demographic change that shaped today's population in India

2013-08-08
India experienced a demographic transformation several thousand years ago, from a region in which mixture between highly different populations was common to one in which mixture even between closely related groups became rare. The finding, which will be published online on August 8, 2013 in the American Journal of Human Genetics, published by Cell Press, provides new information about the peopling of India and improves our understanding of the changes that led to the present-day structure of Indian populations. "Prior to the population mixture and as recently as a few ...

Virtual control room helps nuclear operators, industry

2013-08-08
IDAHO FALLS — Modernizing nuclear power plants to help extend their operating lifetimes is no small task. But the endeavor offers an opportunity to improve control-room design and layout. The Department of Energy's new Human System Simulation Laboratory (HSSL) at Idaho National Laboratory is a full-scale virtual nuclear control room that can test the safety and reliability of proposed technology replacements before they are implemented in commercial nuclear control rooms. The facility is now helping Duke Energy embark on an upgrade project for several of its nuclear ...

Genetic evidence shows recent population mixture in India

2013-08-08
Scientists from Harvard Medical School and the CSIR-Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology in Hyderabad, India, provide evidence that modern-day India is the result of recent population mixture among divergent demographic groups. The findings, published August 8 in the American Journal of Human Genetics, describe how India transformed from a country where mixture between different populations was rampant to one where endogamy—that is, marrying within the local community and a key attribute of the caste system—became the norm. "Only a few thousand years ago, the ...

LEC: A multi-purpose tool

2013-08-08
KANSAS CITY, MO—A little-studied factor known as the Little Elongation Complex (LEC) plays a critical and previously unknown role in the transcription of small nuclear RNAs (snRNA), according to a new study led by scientists at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research and published in the Aug. 22, 2013, issue of the journal Molecular Cell. "We have found that LEC not only has a role in this process—it is like the "Swiss Army knife" of snRNA transcription," says Stowers Investigator Ali Shilatifard, senior author of the study. "LEC does it all." The findings shed new ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

4D Medicine raises £3.4 million for unique biomaterial platform

Ancient marine animal had inventive past despite being represented by few species, new study finds

Quantum sensor for the atomic world developed through international scientific collaboration

The research was wrong: study shows moderate drinking won’t lengthen your life

Save your data on printable magnetic devices? New laser technique’s twist might make this reality

Early onset dementia more common than previously reported – the incidence of Alzheimer’s disease seems to be on the rise

Pesticides potentially as bad as smoking for increased risk in certain cancers

NUS researchers develop new battery-free technology to power electronic devices using ambient radiofrequency signals

New protein discovery may influence future cancer treatment

Timing matters: Scripps Research study shows ways to improve health alerts

New gene therapy approach shows promise for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Chemical analyses find hidden elements from renaissance astronomer Tycho Brahe’s alchemy laboratory

Pacific Northwest launches clean hydrogen energy hub

Tiny deletion in heart muscle protein briefly affects embryonic ventricles but has long-term effects on adult atrial fibrillation

Harms of prescribing NSAIDs to high risk groups estimated to cost NHS £31m over 10 years

Wearing a face mask in public spaces cuts risk of common respiratory symptoms, suggests Norway study

Some private biobanks overinflating the value of umbilical cord blood banking in marketing to expectant parents

New research in fatty liver disease aims to help with early intervention

Genetics reveal ancient trade routes and path to domestication of the Four Corners potato

SNIS 2024: New study shows critical improvements in treating rare eye cancer in children

Wearable devices can increase health anxiety. Could they adversely affect health?

Addressing wounds of war

Rice researchers develop innovative battery recycling method

It’s got praying mantis eyes

Stroke recovery: It’s in the genes

Foam fluidics showcase Rice lab’s creative approach to circuit design

Montana State scientists publish evidence for new groups of methane-producing organisms

Daily rhythms depend on receptor density in biological clock

New England Journal of Medicine publishes outcomes from practice-changing E1910 trial for patients with BCR::ABL1-negative B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Older adults want to cut back on medication, but study shows need for caution

[Press-News.org] Why does a high-fat diet induce preeclampsia-like symptoms in pregnant rats?