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Too much turkey: What happens when you overeat? (video)

Too much turkey: What happens when you overeat? (video)
2014-11-24
(Press-News.org) WASHINGTON, Nov. 24, 2014 -- The season of giving is often also the season of over-indulging at the dinner table. As Thanksgiving approaches, Reactions takes a look down at our stomachs to find out what happens when you overeat. Put on your "eating pants" and enjoy the video here:

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Too much turkey: What happens when you overeat? (video)

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[Press-News.org] Too much turkey: What happens when you overeat? (video)