PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
FREE PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

Current BMI tests underestimate obesity in teens with disabilities

2015-06-09
(Press-News.org) June 9, 2015 - New approaches, based on body mass index (BMI) or other simple measures, are needed to improve assessment of obesity in adolescents with physical disabilities, reports a paper in the American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, the official journal of the Association of Academic Physiatrists. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.

Obesity is a major problem in children and adolescents with mobility limitations, but standard assessments tend to underestimate it, according to the new research by Brooks C. Wingo, PhD, of University of Alabama at Birmingham and colleagues. They suggest new cutoff points are needed for identifying disabled teens who may need diagnosis and treatment to prevent health and functional problems due to excess body weight.

What's the Best Measure to Assess Obesity in Disabled Teens? The study included 29 adolescents (average age 16) who had spinal cord injury or other types of physical disability and used a wheelchair to get around. The researchers assessed various clinical indicators of body weight--not only BMI (calculated from height and weight), but also the width of a skinfold pinched in the upper arm (triceps) and circumferences of the waist, arm, and leg.

In addition, a procedure called dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was done to measure the patients' percentage of body fat. Obesity was defined as 30 percent or greater body fat for males and 35 percent or greater for females. The various clinical measures were evaluated as indicators of obesity, as objectively determined by DXA.

As in previous studies, many of the teens with physical disability were obese. Thirty-five percent of boys and 58 percent of girls met the DXA criteria points for obesity.

However, if assessed by BMI alone, many of the patients would be misclassified as non-obese. Based on the standard BMI cutoff point of 95th percentile or higher for their age, only six percent of boys and 42 percent of girls were classified as obese. (Because they are still growing, the adult BMI cutoff point of 30 or higher isn't appropriate for assessing obesity for children and adolescents.)

All of the clinical measures were significantly correlated with body fat among the teens with disabilities. The best-performing measure was BMI, using a cutoff point of 20 for boys and 19 for girls. The second-best measure was waist circumference, with cutoff points of 83 centimeters (about 33 inches) for boys and 78 centimeters (about 31 inches) for girls.

Children and adolescents with physical disabilities are at high risk for obesity. In addition to health issues such as diabetes and heart disease, obesity puts disabled youth at risk of a wide range of other problems, such as pain and depression, and may further limit their independence and mobility.

But it can be challenging to assess obesity and overweight in people with disabilities, and especially in children and adolescents. While DXA is a more reliable test for measuring body fat, it's not practical for everyday clinical use.

The exploratory study confirms that current cutoff points underestimate obesity in adolescents with physical disabilities. It also provides a first step toward developing alternative assessments of obesity in this group of patients, although further research will be needed to confirm and validate the proposed alternative measures. Dr. Wingo and coauthors also call for the development of disability-specific cutoff points, "which will allow clinicians to better identify children at risk of adiposity-related diseases and offer parents preventive strategies to improve the health and quality of life of their children."

INFORMATION:

Click here to read "Exploratory Study Examining Clinical Measures of Adiposity Risk for Predicting Obesity in Adolescents with Physical Disabilities."

Article: "Exploratory Study Examining Clinical Measures of Adiposity Risk for Predicting Obesity in Adolescents with Physical Disabilities" (doi: 10.1097/PHM.0000000000000323)

About AJPM&R American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation focuses on the practice, research and educational aspects of physical medicine and rehabilitation. Monthly issues keep physiatrists up-to-date on the optimal functional restoration of patients with disabilities, physical treatment of neuromuscular impairments, the development of new rehabilitative technologies, and the use of electrodiagnostic studies. The Journal publishes cutting-edge basic and clinical research, clinical case reports and in-depth topical reviews of interest to rehabilitation professionals.

About the Association of Academic Physiatrists The Association of Academic Physiatrists (AAP) was founded in 1967 to serve as the national organization of physiatrists who are affiliated with medical schools. The AAP is a member organization of the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). The AAP is the only academic association dedicated to the specialty of physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R) in the world. The mission of the Association is creating the future of academic physiatry through mentorship, leadership, and discovery.

About Wolters Kluwer Wolters Kluwer is a global leader in professional information services. Professionals in the areas of legal, business, tax, accounting, finance, audit, risk, compliance and healthcare rely on Wolters Kluwer's market leading information-enabled tools and software solutions to manage their business efficiently, deliver results to their clients, and succeed in an ever more dynamic world.

Wolters Kluwer reported 2014 annual revenues of €3.7 billion. The group serves customers in over 170 countries, and employs over 19,000 people worldwide. The company is headquartered in Alphen aan den Rijn, the Netherlands. Wolters Kluwer shares are listed on NYSE Euronext Amsterdam (WKL) and are included in the AEX and Euronext 100 indices. Wolters Kluwer has a sponsored Level 1 American Depositary Receipt program. The ADRs are traded on the over-the-counter market in the U.S. (WTKWY).

For more information about our products and organization, visit http://www.wolterskluwer.com, follow @WKHealth or @Wolters_Kluwer on Twitter, like us on Facebook, follow us on LinkedIn, or follow WoltersKluwerComms on YouTube.



ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

Small molecules change biological clock rhythm

Small molecules change biological clock rhythm
2015-06-09
Nagoya, Japan - A team of chemists and biologists at the Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (ITbM), Nagoya University have succeeded in finding new molecules that change the circadian rhythm in mammals by applying synthetic chemistry methods, which makes use of highly selective metal catalysts. Most living organisms have a biological clock with an approximately 24-hour circadian rhythm, which regulates important body functions such as sleep/wake cycles, hormone secretion, and metabolism. Disruption of the circadian rhythm by genetic mutations and environmental ...

Been there? Done that? If you are sure, thank your 'memory cells'

2015-06-09
LOS ANGELES (JUNE 8, 2015) - The witness on the stand says he saw the accused at the scene of the crime. Is he sure? How sure? The jury's verdict could hinge on that level of certainty. Many decisions we make every day are influenced by our memories and the confidence we have in them. But very little is known about how we decide whether we can trust a memory or not. A new Cedars-Sinai study provides some of the answers. Researchers have identified a unique set of neurons in the medial temporal lobe, an area of the brain where memories and memory-based decisions are ...

Largest-ever scientific camera trapping survey reveals 'secret lives of the Serengeti'

2015-06-09
The use of camera traps -- remote automatic cameras triggered by heat or motion -- has revolutionized wildlife ecology and conservation research. But the large number of images generated through the traps creates the problem of categorizing and analyzing all the images. For a recent project conducted in the Serengeti National Park, Alexandra Swanson, turned to another relatively new technology -- a citizen science platform. The Snapshot Serengeti project asked non-scientist volunteers to review 1.2 million sets of images. A description of the project, 'Snapshot Serengeti, ...

Clinicians reluctant to prescribe medication that counteracts effects of opioid overdose

2015-06-09
A variety of factors including questions about risk and reluctance to offend patients limits clinician willingness to prescribe a potentially life-saving medication that counteracts the effects of an opioid overdose, according to a Kaiser Permanente Colorado study published today in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. The number of fatal overdoses from opioid medications has quadrupled in the U.S. since 1999. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), each day 44 people die of prescription painkiller overdoses. In the event of an overdose, ...

Physician waivers to prescribe buprenorphine increases potential access to treatment

2015-06-09
American physicians with waivers allowing them to provide office-based medication-assisted buprenorphine treatment to patients addicted to opioids were able to increase potential access to effective medication-assisted treatment by 74 percent from 2002 to 2011, according to a new RAND Corporation study. Published in the June issue of the journal Health Affairs, the study shows that the increased number and geographic distribution of physicians obtaining waivers to prescribe buprenorphine has widened potential access to effective treatment for those with addiction to heroin ...

New research: Danish nasal filter more than halves symptoms of hay fever

New research: Danish nasal filter more than halves symptoms of hay fever
2015-06-09
Getting through the pollen season can now become easier for some of the approximately 500 million people worldwide who suffer from sneezing and a runny nose, watery eyes and drowsiness during the allergy season (seasonal allergic rhinitis). This is indicated by a controlled trial carried out by researchers from Aarhus University. The trial, which took place over two days, included 65 people with grass pollen allergies who were not receiving any medical treatment at that time. They were either equipped with a nasal filter or a placebo device. The conclusion was that the ...

Earlier surgical intervention for mitral valve disease is better for most patients

2015-06-09
Chicago, June 9, 2015 - A more aggressive approach to treating degenerative mitral valve disease, using earlier surgical intervention and less invasive techniques, is more beneficial to the patient than "watchful waiting," according to an article in the June 2015 issue of The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. Key points Earlier surgical intervention using less invasive surgical techniques is better than watchful waiting for patients with degenerative mitral valve disease. Over the 25 years observed, mortality rates remained low, hospital length of stay was shorter, ...

Researchers identify unique marker on mom's chromosomes in early embryo

Researchers identify unique marker on moms chromosomes in early embryo
2015-06-09
Athens, Ga. - Researchers in the University of Georgia's Regenerative Bioscience Center are visually capturing the first process of chromosome alignment and separation at the beginning of mouse development. The findings could lead to answers to questions concerning the mechanisms leading to birth defects and chromosome instability in cancer cells. "We've generated a model that is unique in the world," said Rabindranath De La Fuente, an associate professor in the UGA College of Veterinary Medicine. "Because we removed ATRX protein expression only in the oocyte, the female ...

Land management practices to become important as biofuels use grows

2015-06-09
The handling of agricultural crop residues appears to have a large impact on soil's ability to retain carbon, making land management practices increasingly important, especially under a scenario where cellulosic materials become more heavily used as a feedstock for ethanol production, according to a recently published study led by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory. "Plants and soil are carbon sinks," said Argonne climate scientist Beth Drewniak, who led the study. "Soils lock carbon away for long periods of time. But when plant ...

Just add water: Stanford engineers develop a computer that operates on water droplets

2015-06-09
Computers and water typically don't mix, but in Manu Prakash's lab, the two are one and the same. Prakash, an assistant professor of bioengineering at Stanford, and his students have built a synchronous computer that operates using the unique physics of moving water droplets. The computer is nearly a decade in the making, incubated from an idea that struck Prakash when he was a graduate student. The work combines his expertise in manipulating droplet fluid dynamics with a fundamental element of computer science - an operating clock. "In this work, we finally demonstrate ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

Scientists model 'true prevalence' of COVID-19 throughout pandemic

New breakthrough to help immune systems in the fight against cancer

Through the thin-film glass, researchers spot a new liquid phase

Administering opioids to pregnant mice alters behavior and gene expression in offspring

Brain's 'memory center' needed to recognize image sequences but not single sights

Safety of second dose of mRNA COVID-19 vaccines after first-dose allergic reactions

Changes in disparities in access to care, health after Medicare eligibility

Use of high-risk medications among lonely older adults

65+ and lonely? Don't talk to your doctor about another prescription

Exosome formulation developed to deliver antibodies for choroidal neovascularization therapy

Second COVID-19 mRNA vaccine dose found safe following allergic reactions to first dose

Plant root-associated bacteria preferentially colonize their native host-plant roots

Rare inherited variants in previously unsuspected genes may confer significant risk for autism

International experts call for a unified public health response to NAFLD and NASH epidemic

International collaboration of scientists rewrite the rulebook of flowering plant genetics

Improving air quality reduces dementia risk, multiple studies suggest

Misplaced trust: When trust in science fosters pseudoscience

Two types of blood pressure meds prevent heart events equally, but side effects differ

New statement provides path to include ethnicity, ancestry, race in genomic research

Among effective antihypertensive drugs, less popular choice is slightly safer

Juicy past of favorite Okinawan fruit revealed

Anticipate a resurgence of respiratory viruses in young children

Anxiety, depression, burnout rising as college students prepare to return to campus

Goal-setting and positive parent-child relationships reduce risk of youth vaping

New research identifies cancer types with little survival improvements in adolescents and young adul

Oncotarget: Replication-stress sensitivity in breast cancer cells

Oncotarget: TERT and its binding protein: overexpression of GABPA/B in gliomas

Development of a novel technology to check body temperature with smartphone camera

The mechanics of puncture finally explained

Extreme heat, dry summers main cause of tree death in Colorado's subalpine forests

[Press-News.org] Current BMI tests underestimate obesity in teens with disabilities