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University of Cincinnati research unveils possible new combo therapy for head and neck cancer

Study found an approved drug could make radiation therapy more effective

University of Cincinnati research unveils possible new combo therapy for head and neck cancer
2021-01-22
(Press-News.org) Head and neck cancer is the sixth most common cancer worldwide, and while effective treatments exist, sadly, the cancer often returns.

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati have tested a new combination therapy in animal models to see if they could find a way to make an already effective treatment even better.

Since they're using a Food and Drug Administration-approved drug to do it, this could help humans sooner than later.

These findings are published in the journal END

[Attachments] See images for this press release:
University of Cincinnati research unveils possible new combo therapy for head and neck cancer

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[Press-News.org] University of Cincinnati research unveils possible new combo therapy for head and neck cancer
Study found an approved drug could make radiation therapy more effective