PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
FREE PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

Synthesis of a rare metal complex of nitrous oxide opens new vistas for

Synthesis of a rare metal complex of nitrous oxide opens new vistas for
2021-02-22
(Press-News.org) Like its chemical relative carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas and the dominant ozone-depleting substance emitted in the 21st Century. Consequently, strategies for limiting its emissions and its catalytic decomposition with metals are being developed. A recent study indicates that nitrous oxide can bind to metals similarly to carbon dioxide, which helps to design new complexes with even stronger bonding. This could allow the use of nitrous oxide in synthetic chemistry or help to degrade it to substances harmless to the atmosphere. The results were reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie International Edition as a Very Important Paper on February 17th 2021.

A comprehensive analysis of the global N2O budget has shown that its emissions have been increasing for the past four decades, with agricultural activities responsible for the growth. Even though N2O is present in the atmosphere at a concentration 1000 times less than CO2, it is approximately 300 times more potent as a greenhouse gas.

In nature, N2O is converted by enzymes into N2 and H2O. The process can be mimicked in a laboratory setting using catalytic metal complexes. Surprisingly, well-defined complexes of N2O with transition metals are exceedingly rare, even though CO2 has rich and well-documented coordination chemistry. The vastly dissimilar behaviour of these two related small molecules has been attributed to the poor ligand characteristics of N2O in comparison to CO2, but the origins and details of this justification are difficult to track.

"The more information we tried to find on the topic, the closer we headed to circular reasoning," says Dr. Heikki M. Tuononen from the University of Jyväskylä, Finland. "In many cases, some property of N2O was highlighted, but they are almost all characteristic to CO2 as well", he continues.

"This puzzle was one of the reasons why, during Dr. Tuononen's visit to Calgary as a Killam Scholar, our research teams decided to join forces and synthesize analogous metal complexes of N2O and CO2, and study the metal-ligand interaction in detail", tells Dr. Roland Roesler from the University of Calgary, Canada. A rare metal complex of N2O stable even at room temperature

The results of the two-year investigation showed that, contrary to the general view, the metal binding ability of N2O is equally good or even better than that of CO2.

"It appears that the oxidizing character of N2O is mostly, if not entirely, responsible for the scarcity of metal complexes employing this ligand", says Dr. Tuononen.

"Once we had the right metal partner for N2O, their binding was strong enough that a rare side-on bound complex could be isolated and characterized even at room temperature", continues Dr. Chris Gendy, a former Ph.D. student at University of Calgary who was partially responsible of the synthetic work.

In addition to showing that N2O has better intrinsic ability to bind to metals than heretofore recognized, the work of the two research teams allows the rational design of N2O complexes that are even more stable than the ones characterized thus far. This could, in turn, open new avenues for using N2O in synthetic chemistry.

"N2O is in many ways a great oxidant. It is thermodynamically strong, relatively cheap, and gives N2 as the only side product", explains Dr. Tuononen.

"It would certainly be great to see more widespread use of N2O as an oxidant in metal-catalysed reactions. At the same time, we should not forget the role it plays in the atmosphere", adds Dr. Roesler.

"Nature has found elegant enzymatic pathways to convert N2O into products that are harmless to the atmosphere. We should aim for the same with our manmade emissions using novel catalysts", the research teams conclude.

INFORMATION:

The paper "Side?on Coordination in Isostructural Nitrous Oxide and Carbon Dioxide Complexes of Nickel" by Braulio Michele Puerta Lombardi, Chris Gendy, Benjamin S. Gelfand, Guy M. Bernard, Roderick E. Wasylishen, Heikki M. Tuononen and Roland Roesler was published online as a Very Important Paper in Angewandte Chemie International Edition on February 17th 2021.
Link to publication: https://doi.org/10.1002/anie.202011301

Research resources for the project have been provided by the Universities of Calgary, Jyväskylä, and Alberta, as well as Canada Foundation for Innovation and Finnish Grid and Cloud Infrastructure. The project also received funding from the European Research Council under the EU's Horizon 2020 programme (Grant #772510 to H.M.T.) as well as from the NSERC of Canada in the form of Discovery Grants (#2019-07195 to R.R. and #2019-06816 to R.E.W).

More information: Heikki M. Tuononen,
tel. +358-40-805-3713,
heikki.m.tuononen@jyu.fi Roland Roesler,
tel. +1-403-220-5366,
roesler@ucalgary.ca


[Attachments] See images for this press release:
Synthesis of a rare metal complex of nitrous oxide opens new vistas for

ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

Researchers discover potential new therapeutic targets on SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein

2021-02-22
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. -- The COVID-19 pandemic has prompted considerable investigation into how the SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein attaches to a human cell during the infection process, as this knowledge is useful in designing vaccines and therapeutics. Now, a team of scientists has discovered additional locations on the Spike protein that may not only help to explain how certain mutations make emerging variants more infectious but also could be used as additional targets for therapeutic intervention. "Significant research is underway to examine how the receptor binding domain (RBD) at the tip of the club-shaped SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein attaches to an ACE2 receptor on a ...

Positive vibes only: Forego negative texts or risk being labelled a downer

Positive vibes only: Forego negative texts or risk being labelled a downer
2021-02-22
A new study from researchers at the University of Ottawa's School of Psychology has found that using negative emojis in text messages produces a negative perception of the sender regardless of their true intent. Isabelle Boutet, a Full Professor in Psychology in the Faculty of Social Sciences, and her team's findings are included in the study 'Emojis influence emotional communication, social attributions, and information processing' which was published in Computers in Human Behavior. Study background: Eye movements of 38 University of Ottawa volunteer undergraduate student participants were tracked and studied, and the volunteers were shown sentence-emoji pairing under 12 different conditions where sentences could be negative, positive, ...

CHOP experts describe types of rashes associated with MIS-C

CHOP experts describe types of rashes associated with MIS-C
2021-02-22
Philadelphia, February 22, 2021--In April 2020, pediatricians began recognizing a puzzling syndrome in children involving hyperinflammation that results in an array of symptoms, including fever, gastrointestinal distress and rash. The syndrome, thought to be a post-infectious complication of SARS-CoV-2 infection, was given the name Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome Children, or MIS-C. However, diagnosing the condition has posed challenges, as many of its symptoms, including rash, are common in many other pediatric infections. In a study published in Open Forum Infectious Diseases, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) describe the ...

Potentially harmful chemicals found in plastic toys

Potentially harmful chemicals found in plastic toys
2021-02-22
It has long been known that several chemicals used in plastic toys in different parts of the world can be harmful to human health. However, it is difficult for parents to figure out how to avoid plastic toys containing chemicals that may cause possible health risks to their children. Regulations and labelling schemes are different across regions and countries, and there is no international agreement on which substances should be banned from use in toy materials. For the most part, regulations and international lists of 'chemicals of concern' in toys focus on certain substance groups with known harmful properties, such as phthalates, but do not cover the wider range of chemicals found in plastic toys. Researchers from DTU ...

What is COVID-19's impact on Black and Latino persons living with HIV?

2021-02-22
With the COVID-19 pandemic taking a disproportionate toll on low-income people of color, a research team headed by Marya Gwadz of the Silver School of Social Work at New York University set out to understand the ways the pandemic may put individuals at risk for adverse outcomes, and the ways they successfully adapted to and coped with the emerging pandemic, focused on those from low-socioeconomic status backgrounds who have lived with HIV for a decade or longer. The team's newly published study explores the effects of COVID-19 on engagement in HIV care, HIV medication use and overall wellbeing during the early stages of the ...

Potential regional declines in species richness of tomato pollinators under climate

2021-02-22
About 70% of the world's main crops depend on insect pollination. Climate change is already affecting the abundance and distribution of insects, which could cause geographical mismatches between crops and their pollinators. Crops that rely primarily on wild pollinators (e.g., crops that cannot be effectively pollinated by commercial colonies of honey bees) could be particularly in jeopardy. However, limited information on plant-pollinator associations and pollinator distributions complicate the assessment of climate change impacts on specific crops. To study the potential impacts of climate change on pollination of a specific crop in North America, we use the case of open?field ...

Screening for macrocyclic peptides

2021-02-22
Macrocyclic peptides are promising candidates for pharmaceuticals, but their screening is difficult. Scientists have now developed an easy-to-use, high-throughput screening assay for cyclic peptides with affinity to ubiquitin, a protein that helps to degrade proteins and induce cell death. The results could lead to novel drug candidates against cancer, according to the study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie. Drugs based on peptides (small proteins) are often too large to pass through cell membranes. To make such peptides more compact and stable--and thus more efficient--researchers are investigating their closed versions, called macrocyclic ...

CUHK physicists discover new route to active matter self-organisation

CUHK physicists discover new route to active matter self-organisation
2021-02-22
This new finding may pave the way for fabricating a new class of self-driven devices and materials, such as the ability to control the rhythmic movement of soft robots without relying on electronic circuits, and for the study of microbial physiology. It has been published in the scientific journal Nature. A fast growing and interdisciplinary field, active matter science studies systems consist of units where energy is spent locally to generate mechanical work. Active matter includes all living organisms from cells to animals, biopolymers driven by molecular motors, and synthetic self-propelled materials. Self-organisation (the process of producing ordered structures via interaction between ...

CovMT: Tracking virus mutations across the world

2021-02-22
A SARS-CoV-2 tracker uses publicly available sequencing data to show how the virus is changing and spreading over time. The tracker, called CovMT, was developed at KAUST and is expected to help researchers and policymakers understand the evolution of the virus's mutations. This could have implications for vaccine development, patient treatment and the implementation of restrictions. "As new variants of the SARS-CoV-2 virus emerge, authorities around the world need to know if these, or similar variants, have entered their countries," says computational biologist, Intikhab Alam, who designed ...

A salt solution for desalinating brine

2021-02-22
Treating waste brine using a self-cleaning crystallizer that runs on solar power could be an eco-friendly and efficient way to make seawater desalination more sustainable. In desert regions, seawater desalination provides essential freshwater for drinking and agriculture. A major problem is that the process generates vast quantities of concentrated brine that is often released into nearby lakes and rivers or back into the sea, harming vegetation and marine life. "With tightening environmental regulations and increasing public awareness, there is pressure to treat brine with zero liquid discharge," says Chenlin Zhang, a Ph.D. student in KAUST. This means extracting every last drop of water while leaving behind solid mineral crystals that can be salvaged for other uses. Crystallization ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

Understanding the evolution of SARS and COVID-19 type viruses

Abnormal sodium levels in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 predict death or respiratory failure

Microscopic behavior of developing breast cells uncovered

How wildfires may have larger effects on cloud formation than previously thought

One California community shows how to take the waste out of water

Mortality rises among public when health workers get sick in an outbreak, model suggests

Current liver cancer screenings may leave African Americans at greater risk

Health professional societies address critical care clinician burnout

Real-world effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccine - research by Clalit Research Institute

Novel pooled testing strategies can significantly better identify COVID-19 infections

Why some coronavirus strains are more infectious than others

Scientists reveal details of antibodies that work against Zika virus

Scientists uncover new details of SARS-CoV-2 interactions with human cells

Antibodies recognize and attack different SARS-CoV-2 spike shapes

How SARS-CoV-2's sugar-coated shield helps activate the virus

A Canadian success story: world-first to treat Fabry disease with gene therapy

Chimpanzees and humans share overlapping territories

Allergy season starts earlier each year due to climate change and pollen transport

Study shows opioid use among US patients with knee osteoarthritis costs 14 billion dollars in societal costs

On the line: Watching nanoparticles get in shape

A-maze-ing pheasants have two ways of navigating

CAR T-cell therapy generates lasting remissions in patients with multiple myeloma

Fantastic voyage: Nanobodies could help CRISPR turn genes on and off

Baby mice have a skill that humans want - and this microchip might help us learn it

New discoveries on the containment of COVID-19 finds travel bans are of limited value

UM scientists achieve breakthrough in culturing corals and sea anemones cells

New shape-changing 4D materials hold promise for morphodynamic tissue engineering

Apollo rock samples capture key moments in the Moon's early history, study find

COVID-19 isolation linked to increased domestic violence, researchers suggest

What to do when a mammogram shows swollen lymph nodes in women just vaccinated for COVID

[Press-News.org] Synthesis of a rare metal complex of nitrous oxide opens new vistas for