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NYUAD researchers develop high throughput paper-based arrays of 3D tumor models

New technology will help researchers predict the outcomes of drug efficacy and can guide the development of drug treatments for tumors

NYUAD researchers develop high throughput paper-based arrays of 3D tumor models
2021-02-22
(Press-News.org) Abu Dhabi, UAE, February 22: By engineering common filter papers, similar to coffee filters, a team of NYU Abu Dhabi researchers have created high throughput arrays of miniaturized 3D tumor models to replicate key aspects of tumor physiology, which are absent in traditional drug testing platforms. With the new paper-based technology, the formed tumor models can be safely cryopreserved and stored for prolonged periods for on-demand drug testing use. These cryopreservable tumor models could provide the pharmaceutical industry with an easy and low cost method for investigating the outcomes of drug efficacy, potentially bolstering personalized medicine. The developed technology can be transferred to other trending therapeutic applications such as measuring tumor response to drug concentration gradients, studying cancer cell signaling pathways, and investigations of invasive tumors.

The findings were published in the paper END

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NYUAD researchers develop high throughput paper-based arrays of 3D tumor models

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[Press-News.org] NYUAD researchers develop high throughput paper-based arrays of 3D tumor models
New technology will help researchers predict the outcomes of drug efficacy and can guide the development of drug treatments for tumors