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NYU Abu Dhabi researcher sheds new light on the psychology of radicalization

The paper explores how to reverse this potentially violent form of addiction by restoring an individual's psychological needs and how challenging their ideology is counterproductive

2021-02-22
(Press-News.org) Abu Dhabi, UAE, February 22, 2021: Learning more about what motivates people to join violent ideological groups and engage in acts of cruelty against others is of great social and societal importance. New research from Assistant Professor of Psychology at NYUAD Jocelyn Bélanger explores the idea of ideological obsession as a form of addictive behavior that is central to understanding why people ultimately engage in ideological violence, and how best to help them break this addiction.

In the new study, END


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[Press-News.org] NYU Abu Dhabi researcher sheds new light on the psychology of radicalization
The paper explores how to reverse this potentially violent form of addiction by restoring an individual's psychological needs and how challenging their ideology is counterproductive