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Where Siberian orchids thrive: New hotspot of orchids discovered near Novosibirsk

Where Siberian orchids thrive: New hotspot of orchids discovered near Novosibirsk
2021-04-08
(Press-News.org) Orchids of the Boreal zone are rare species. Most of the 28,000 species of the Orchid family actually live in the tropics. In the Boreal zone, ground orchids can hardly tolerate competition from other plants -- mainly forbs or grasses. So they are often pushed into ecotones -- border areas between meadows and forests, or between forests and swamps.

Furthermore, there has been a decline in wild orchids all over North America and Eurasia, caused in part by human-induced destruction of their habitats, the transformation of ecosystems, and the harvesting of flowers from the wild.

In the Novosibirsk region, 30 orchid species have been found, and about 40 in the entire Siberia.

It is no coincidence that many orchids are included in regional and national Red Book lists, with dedicated protected areas created to preserve them. When specialists find high concentrations of orchid species in a small area, it is always a significant discovery, in terms of both science and ecology. A END

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Where Siberian orchids thrive: New hotspot of orchids discovered near Novosibirsk

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[Press-News.org] Where Siberian orchids thrive: New hotspot of orchids discovered near Novosibirsk