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Incidence of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children among people with SARS-CoV-2 infection in US

2021-06-10
(Press-News.org) What The Study Did: The incidence of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) among people with SARS-CoV-2 infection in the United States was estimated in this study.

Authors: Angela P. Campbell, M.D., M.P.H., of the COVID-19 Response Team at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, was the corresponding author.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

(doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2021.16420)

Editor's Note: The article includes conflict of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, conflict of interest and financial disclosures, and funding and support.

INFORMATION:

Media advisory: The full study is linked to this news release.

Embed this link to provide your readers free access to the full-text article This link will be live at the embargo time http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2021.16420?utm_source=For_The_Media&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=ftm_links&utm_term=061021

About JAMA Network Open: JAMA Network Open is the new online-only open access general medical journal from the JAMA Network. On weekdays, the journal publishes peer-reviewed clinical research and commentary in more than 40 medical and health subject areas. Every article is free online from the day of publication.



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[Press-News.org] Incidence of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children among people with SARS-CoV-2 infection in US