PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
FREE PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

University of Minnesota Medical School report details the effects of COVID-19 on adolescent sexual health

2021-06-23
(Press-News.org) MINNEAPOLIS/ST. PAUL (06/23/2021) -- A new report from the University of Minnesota Medical School's Healthy Youth Development - Prevention Research Center (HYD-PRC) highlights that Minnesota youth continue to contract sexually transmitted infections (STIs) at alarmingly high rates, despite the COVID-19 pandemic.

The 2021 Minnesota Adolescent Sexual Health Report says that chlamydia and gonorrhea rates among Minnesota adolescents in 2020 are likely underreported, as both STI testing and case detection were scaled back during the early stages of the pandemic. However, teen pregnancy rates remain virtually unchanged from 2018, and birth rates are at historic lows for 15- to 19-year-olds.

"We must continue to highlight the importance of condoms and other barrier methods, utilize new and innovative public health educational campaigns, address STI testing shortages and expand young people's access to STI screening and treatment," said Jill Farris, MPH, director of Adolescent Sexual Health Training and Education for the HYD-PRC at the U of M Medical School.

Minnesota youth are disproportionately impacted by STIs, with the highest chlamydia and gonorrhea rates among Black and Hispanic youth. While adolescents aged 15 to 19 are only 6.5% of Minnesota's population, they accounted for 25% of all chlamydia cases and 16% of gonorrhea cases in 2020.

The report also details that disparities in sexual health outcomes -- by geography, race and ethnicity -- continue to persist. Rural areas in Minnesota continue to experience the highest teen birth rates in the state. Birth rates for American Indian, Black and Hispanic youth are higher than for white youth, and birth rates for Asian/Pacific Islander and American Indian youth are higher than national figures.

"COVID-19 may also play into the rates of STIs and pregnancy," Farris said. "While we won't know the full impact of COVID-19 on the sexual health of adolescents for a few years, we do know that providers made extraordinary efforts to reach out and connect with youth during this difficult time."

Adolescent sexual health clinicians and educators utilized telehealth/virtual learning last year due to COVID-19. The HYD-PRC surveyed 94 organizations that provided adolescent sexual health care, sex education or both during the pandemic. Organizations reported on their use of telehealth/virtual education and shared that online and hybrid options for health care and sex education need to continue after the pandemic to improve health equity among adolescents in Minnesota.

"We are excited to analyze the data over the next few years to determine if virtual platforms increased the reach of sexual health education and services, which, in turn, hopefully continues to decrease the rates of STIs and pregnancies among Minnesota youth," Farris said.

While many programs and services focus on changing individual behaviors that lead to teen pregnancy, more attention is now being focused on the social determinants that contribute to poor health outcomes through systematic lack of access to resources, power and opportunity.

"We must fully support young people's health by addressing their physical, social, emotional and cognitive development and provide them with skills and support to make healthy decisions," Farris said. "Continued focus on reducing systematic barriers and continuing to provide online and hybrid options for health care and sex education will empower Minnesota youth to make healthy choices."

INFORMATION:

The full report aims to help Minnesotans understand the current landscape of young people's sexual and reproductive health and how it is tied more broadly to healthy youth development. Interactive, individualized reports for each of Minnesota's 87 counties are also provided. To learn more about the Healthy Youth Development-Prevention Research Center, visit this website. About the University of Minnesota Medical School The University of Minnesota Medical School is at the forefront of learning and discovery, transforming medical care and educating the next generation of physicians. Our graduates and faculty produce high-impact biomedical research and advance the practice of medicine. We acknowledge that the U of M Medical School, both the Twin Cities campus and Duluth campus, is located on traditional, ancestral and contemporary lands of the Dakota and the Ojibwe, and scores of other Indigenous people, and we affirm our commitment to tribal communities and their sovereignty as we seek to improve and strengthen our relations with tribal nations. For more information about the U of M Medical School, please visit med.umn.edu.



ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

Odd smell: flies sniff ammonia in a way new to science

2021-06-23
The stink of ammonia in urine, sweat, and rotting meat repels humans, but many insects find ammonia alluring. Now, UConn researchers have figured out how the annoying insects smell it, a discovery that could lead to better ways to make them buzz off. The sense of smell is enormously important. Mammals devote a third of their genetic code to odor receptors found in the nose, and have more than 1,000 different kinds that allow us to smell an estimated trillion different odors. Flies don't have noses. Instead, they smell with their antenna. Each antenna is covered with tiny hairs called sensilla. Each sensilla contains a few neurons--fly brain cells. Each neuron expresses one type of odor receptor, and they all fall into two main ...

Fracture setting method could replace metal plates, with fewer complications

Fracture setting method could replace metal plates, with fewer complications
2021-06-23
A new biocompatible polymer-based composite material could soon replace metal plates in treating difficult and unstable fractures. Developed at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, the newly-developed material is as strong as dental composites yet non-toxic. The material and a surgical method, which were published in Advanced Functional Materials, will be used in clinical studies in 2023 and 2024, with a focus on hand fractures. Michael Malkoch, professor of fibre and polymer technology at KTH, says that the material and method, AdhFix, will enable customized plating for fixation of fractures with a more comfortable, less complicated recovery. Collarbone and rib fractures in particular are ideally suited for the proposed treatment, ...

Sneeze cam reveals best fabric combos for cloth masks (video)

Sneeze cam reveals best fabric combos for cloth masks (video)
2021-06-23
During the COVID-19 pandemic, cloth face masks became a way to help protect yourself and others from the virus. And for some people, they became a fashion statement, with many fabric choices available. But just how effective are they, especially in containing a sneeze? Now, researchers reporting in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering used high-speed videos of a person sneezing to identify the optimal cloth mask design. Watch a video of the sneeze cam here. Early in the pandemic, worldwide shortages of surgical masks and N95 respirators led many people to make or purchase cloth face masks. Now, with safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines available, mask restrictions are ...

'Lady luck' - Does anthropomorphized luck drive risky financial behavior?

2021-06-23
A new study published in the Journal of the Association for Consumer Research posits that increased accessibility to anthropomorphized luck (i.e., "lady luck") can lead consumers to be more likely to pursue higher-risk financial behavior. In "Lady Luck: Anthropomorphized Luck Creates Perceptions of Risk-Sharing and Drives Pursuit of Risky Alternatives," authors Katina Kulow, Thomas Kramer, and Kara Bentley propose that preferences for higher-risk options (like lottery tickets with worse odds or investment opportunities with a low chance of return) are driven by shared risk perceptions that might engender feelings of security provided by the idea of "lady luck." This behavior, the authors note, "bodes ill for consumer welfare, given that many financial maladaptive activities ...

People willing to pay more for coffee that's ethical and eco-friendly, meta-analysis finds

2021-06-23
Beyond how much cream and sugar to add to their morning brew, coffee lovers also face more serious decisions: one of those is whether or not to buy ecolabelled coffee, which advertises itself as more ethical and environmentally friendly. But whether customers are willing to pay the extra price for these perks remains an unanswered question. In a study publishing in the journal Heliyon on June 23, researchers combined data from 22 studies to conclude that in general, people are willing to pay $1.36 more for a pound of coffee that's produced in an eco-friendly way and are especially partial to coffee that's labelled "Organic." "We hear in the media or sometimes read in the newspaper that there ...

Low-cost imaging technique shows how smartphone batteries could charge in minutes

2021-06-23
Researchers have developed a simple lab-based technique that allows them to look inside lithium-ion batteries and follow lithium ions moving in real time as the batteries charge and discharge, something which has not been possible until now. Using the low-cost technique, the researchers identified the speed-limiting processes which, if addressed, could enable the batteries in most smartphones and laptops to charge in as little as five minutes. The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, say their technique will not only help improve existing battery materials, ...

Pleistocene sediment DNA from Denisova Cave

Pleistocene sediment DNA from Denisova Cave
2021-06-23
Denisova Cave is located in the Altai Mountains in southern Siberia and is famous for the discovery of Denisovans, an extinct form of archaic humans that is thought to have occupied large parts of central and eastern Asia. Neandertal remains have also been found at the site, as well as a bone from a child who had a Neandertal mother and Denisovan father, showing that both groups met in the region. However, only eight bone fragments and teeth of Neandertals and Denisovans have been recovered so far from the deposits in Denisova Cave, which cover ...

Quantum birds

Quantum birds
2021-06-23
Humans perceive the world around them with five senses - vision, hearing, taste, smell and touch. Many other animals are also able to sense the Earth's magnetic field. For some time, a collaboration of biologists, chemists and physicists centred at the Universities of Oldenburg (Germany) and Oxford (UK) have been gathering evidence suggesting that the magnetic sense of migratory birds such as European robins is based on a specific light-sensitive protein in the eye. In the current edition of the journal Nature, this team demonstrate that the protein cryptochrome 4, found in birds' retinas, is sensitive to magnetic fields and could well be the long-sought magnetic sensor. First ...

Antibody therapy rescues mice from lethal nerve-muscle disease

2021-06-23
Researchers rescued mice from early death caused by a muscle-weakening disease, not by correcting the flawed gene that causes it, but instead by targeting another protein in the same signaling pathway. Led by NYU Grossman School of Medicine researchers, a new study found that an antibody treatment not only rescued young mice from a form of congenital myasthenia (CM) but also reversed disease relapse in adult mice. Published online in the journal Nature on June 23, the study revealed new details of the cause of CM, with the better understanding guiding ...

Life in these star-systems could have spotted Earth

2021-06-23
ITHACA, N.Y. - Scientists at Cornell University and the American Museum of Natural History have identified 2,034 nearby star-systems - within the small cosmic distance of 326 light-years - that could find Earth merely by watching our pale blue dot cross our sun. That's 1,715 star-systems that could have spotted Earth since human civilization blossomed about 5,000 years ago, and 319 more star-systems that will be added over the next 5,000 years. Exoplanets around these nearby stars have a cosmic front-row seat to see if Earth holds life, the scientists said in research published June 23 in Nature. "From the exoplanets' point-of-view, we are the aliens," said Lisa Kaltenegger, professor of astronomy and director of Cornell's Carl Sagan ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

Scientists model 'true prevalence' of COVID-19 throughout pandemic

New breakthrough to help immune systems in the fight against cancer

Through the thin-film glass, researchers spot a new liquid phase

Administering opioids to pregnant mice alters behavior and gene expression in offspring

Brain's 'memory center' needed to recognize image sequences but not single sights

Safety of second dose of mRNA COVID-19 vaccines after first-dose allergic reactions

Changes in disparities in access to care, health after Medicare eligibility

Use of high-risk medications among lonely older adults

65+ and lonely? Don't talk to your doctor about another prescription

Exosome formulation developed to deliver antibodies for choroidal neovascularization therapy

Second COVID-19 mRNA vaccine dose found safe following allergic reactions to first dose

Plant root-associated bacteria preferentially colonize their native host-plant roots

Rare inherited variants in previously unsuspected genes may confer significant risk for autism

International experts call for a unified public health response to NAFLD and NASH epidemic

International collaboration of scientists rewrite the rulebook of flowering plant genetics

Improving air quality reduces dementia risk, multiple studies suggest

Misplaced trust: When trust in science fosters pseudoscience

Two types of blood pressure meds prevent heart events equally, but side effects differ

New statement provides path to include ethnicity, ancestry, race in genomic research

Among effective antihypertensive drugs, less popular choice is slightly safer

Juicy past of favorite Okinawan fruit revealed

Anticipate a resurgence of respiratory viruses in young children

Anxiety, depression, burnout rising as college students prepare to return to campus

Goal-setting and positive parent-child relationships reduce risk of youth vaping

New research identifies cancer types with little survival improvements in adolescents and young adul

Oncotarget: Replication-stress sensitivity in breast cancer cells

Oncotarget: TERT and its binding protein: overexpression of GABPA/B in gliomas

Development of a novel technology to check body temperature with smartphone camera

The mechanics of puncture finally explained

Extreme heat, dry summers main cause of tree death in Colorado's subalpine forests

[Press-News.org] University of Minnesota Medical School report details the effects of COVID-19 on adolescent sexual health