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ATS 2023 Conference Program is live! Register now

2023-03-15
(Press-News.org) WHAT:                ATS 2023 Conference Program is Live! Register Now

WHO:                  Scientific Sessions in Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine

WHERE:              Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Washington, DC

WHEN:                May 21-24*

 

The ATS 2023 International Conference Program is now live! Get ready for a series of dynamic scientific programming with presentations covering the basic sciences, research breakthroughs and clinical treatment, as well as spotlighting the next generation of innovators.

Media may register here. Your registration will give you access to the program itinerary where you can begin to build your daily schedule.

For your consideration, below are some of the sessions selected by this year’s International Conference Committee Chairs Andrew Halayko, PhD, ATSF and Debra Boyer, MD, MHPE:

Asthma Hot Topic 2023: Which ICS Plus Bronchodilator Reliever for Which Patient – session A10 Clinical Topics in Pulmonary Medicine: Race and PFTs – session A82 Double Trouble: Air Pollutants and TB – session C90 Opioid Use Disorder, Sleep Deficiency, and Ventilatory Control – session C10  

Join us Saturday evening for the Opening Ceremony with Stephen K. Klasko, MD, MBA, to kick-off this live, in person event.

*Note: the ATS Press Office officially opens on Sunday, May 21.

For more information about ATS 2023, visit the conference site or follow the meeting hashtag #ATS2023. See our press page for details on press registration and guidelines or contact Dacia Morris at dmorris@thoracic.org.

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[Press-News.org] ATS 2023 Conference Program is live! Register now