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Effect of sleep changes on health-related quality of life in healthy children

JAMA Network Open

2023-03-15
(Press-News.org) About The Study: Results of this secondary analysis of a randomized trial involving 100 healthy children ages 8 to 12 indicated that even 39 minutes less of sleep per night for one week significantly reduced several facets of health-related quality of life in children. This finding shows that ensuring children receive sufficient good-quality sleep is an important child health issue. 

Authors: Rachael W. Taylor, Ph.D., of the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand, is the corresponding author. 

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/ 

(doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2023.3005)

Editor’s Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, conflict of interest and financial disclosures, and funding and support.

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About JAMA Network Open: JAMA Network Open is an online-only open access general medical journal from the JAMA Network. On weekdays, the journal publishes peer-reviewed clinical research and commentary in more than 40 medical and health subject areas. Every article is free online from the day of publication.

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[Press-News.org] Effect of sleep changes on health-related quality of life in healthy children
JAMA Network Open