PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

Argonne hosts conference for undergraduate women in physics

Weekend-long event connects women with resources, community, information on graduate school and professionals in their field

Argonne hosts conference for undergraduate women in physics
2023-03-17
(Press-News.org) The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory hosted an American Physical Society (APS) Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics (CUWiP) on Jan. 20-22. The conference series, sponsored by DOE and the National Science Foundation, is designed to support undergraduate women and gender minorities in physics by connecting them with resources, community, information on graduate school and professionals in their field. It also provides students with access to other women in physics with whom they can share experiences, advice and ideas.

The January 2023 event is one of 14 APS CUWiP events hosted across the country and is notable for being the first event hosted solely by a national laboratory. More than ​1​50 students from 40 colleges and universities attended.

“Argonne is committed to equipping the next generation of scientists, and encouraging and retaining undergraduate women in physics is especially crucial to ensure their ongoing success” — Kawtar Hafidi, associate laboratory director of Argonne’s Physical Sciences and Engineering directorate

“Argonne is committed to equipping the next generation of scientists, and encouraging and retaining undergraduate women in physics is especially crucial to ensure their ongoing success,” said Kawtar Hafidi, associate laboratory director of Argonne’s Physical Sciences and Engineering directorate. ​“We are thrilled that Argonne was able to provide a supportive space for these women to find community and gain awareness of the exciting opportunities physics has to offer.”

The conference featured more than 50 speakers, including keynote addresses from Hafidi, as well as Wendy Freedman, John and Marion Sullivan University Professor of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the University of Chicago, and Rachel Ivie, Senior research fellow at the American Institute of Physics.

“It’s important that undergraduate women know that there is a home for them in physics,” said Lindsey Bleem, a physicist at Argonne and one of the event organizers. ​“There are amazing women working at Argonne. Connecting with them shows that there’s real opportunity for women in this field.”

The three-day event included a set of seminars, Q&A panels with women in diverse careers in physics, interactive skills workshops and laboratory and facility tours. Students also had the opportunity to gain experience presenting posters and talks on their undergraduate research.

“CUWiP is a valuable for students like me,” said student organizer Isabele Vitorio. ​“Being exposed to the science conducted at Argonne, and the women behind it, is inspiring. The resources and connections CUWiP provides aren’t found anywhere else.”

More than 50 Argonne scientists and engineers spent time connecting with the students in various activities during the conference.

“In 2020, only about 25% of all bachelor’s degrees in physics in the United States were awarded to women,” said Maria Żurek, a physicist at Argonne and co-organizer of the conference. ​“This year, more than 1,800 women undergraduate physics majors will attend a CUWiP event. It’s important for the success of women in physics to provide them with the opportunities to make connections and see the many physics-related career paths open to them.”

Argonne National Laboratory seeks solutions to pressing national problems in science and technology. The nation’s first national laboratory, Argonne conducts leading-edge basic and applied scientific research in virtually every scientific discipline. Argonne researchers work closely with researchers from hundreds of companies, universities, and federal, state and municipal agencies to help them solve their specific problems, advance America’s scientific leadership and prepare the nation for a better future. With employees from more than 60 nations, Argonne is managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science.

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, visit https://​ener​gy​.gov/​s​c​ience.

END

[Attachments] See images for this press release:
Argonne hosts conference for undergraduate women in physics

ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

How can we tackle the biggest challenges? Ask a plant

How can we tackle the biggest challenges? Ask a plant
2023-03-17
LOS ALAMOS, N.M., March 16, 2023 — Without plants, we’d have no air to breathe or food to eat, yet plant science lingers in the shadowy wings while other fields take center stage. With the goal of shining the spotlight on plants, a new study presents the field’s top 100 most pressing questions for research to address the greatest challenges facing humanity. “The study highlights the importance of plant science for society by laying out myriad questions and technical challenges ...

Genes shed light on why men and women experience different depression symptoms

2023-03-17
Depression is widely reported to be more common in women than in men, with women twice as likely to receive a diagnosis than men. A new sex-specific study from McGill University has found that there are differences between male and female genes and how they relate to depression. In a study of more than 270,000 individuals, the researchers found that sex-specific prediction methods were more accurate in forecasting an individual’s genetic risk of developing depression than prediction methods that did not specify sex. The researchers found ...

Breaking barriers in hepatitis C diagnosis and treatment for populations at risk

Breaking barriers in hepatitis C diagnosis and treatment for populations at risk
2023-03-17
A study with people who inject drugs evaluated a minimally invasive test based on dried blood spots (DBS) for the monitoring of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The use of DBS samples for HCV RNA detection and genotyping was shown to effectively assess cure after treatment and to differentiate between reinfection and treatment failure. The results support the viability of decentralizing treatment and post-treatment monitoring for people who inject drugs, who frequently face challenges accessing the healthcare system. The study, which has been published in the Journal of Medical Virology, was carried out as part of a project with support from the "Conquering ...

UMass Amherst providing 30 three-year scholarships to boost diversity in mathematics and statistics

UMass Amherst providing 30 three-year scholarships to boost diversity in mathematics and statistics
2023-03-17
AMHERST, Mass. – University of Massachusetts Amherst’s Department of Mathematics and Statistics is offering 30 three-year scholarships to a diverse cohort of students majoring in mathematics and statistics, thanks to a $1.5 million dollar grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF). The six-year project, called Enhancing Underrepresented Participation in Mathematics & Statistics: Mentoring from Junior to Master’s, will welcome its first cohort in the Fall of 2023, and will support each student for their junior and senior years, as well as through a one-year master’s program. The program will accept ...

Carbon nanotube films as ultrasensitive photodetectors: progress and challenges

Carbon nanotube films as ultrasensitive photodetectors: progress and challenges
2023-03-17
Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) are being used to develop a third generation of optimized shortwave infrared photodetectors that will improve pixel size, weight, power consumption, performance and cost over photodetectors made from traditional materials.   Ultrasensitive shortwave infrared photodetectors, which detect a subset of shortwave infrared light wavelengths outside of the visual spectrum, have many potential applications, including night surveillance, navigation during poor weather conditions, fiber optic communications and semiconductor quality control.  Shortwave ...

Mountain forests are being lost at an accelerating rate, putting biodiversity at risk

Mountain forests are being lost at an accelerating rate, putting biodiversity at risk
2023-03-17
More than 85% of the world’s bird, mammal, and amphibian species live in mountains,  particularly in forest habitats, but researchers report in the journal One Earth on March 17 that these forests are disappearing at an accelerating rate. Globally, we have lost 78.1 million hectares (7.1%) of mountain forest since 2000—an area larger than the size of Texas. Much of the loss occurred in tropical biodiversity hotspots, putting increasing pressure on threatened species. Though their rugged location once protected mountain forests from deforestation, they have been increasingly exploited since the turn of ...

River deltas: Valuable and under threat

2023-03-17
The livelihoods of millions of people who live in river deltas, among the world’s most productive lands, are at risk. Created where large rivers meet the ocean and deposit their natural sediment load, river deltas are often just a few meters above sea level. And while they make up less than 0.5 % of the world’s land area, river deltas contribute more than 4 % of the global GDP, 3% of global crop production, and are home to 5.5 % of the world’s population. All of these values are highly vulnerable to imminent global environmental change, according to a new Stanford University-led study. “It is often not rising seas, but sinking land due to human activities that ...

Few Medicaid-participating primary care physicians providing longer-acting birth control methods

2023-03-17
WASHINGTON (March 17, 2023)— Medicaid beneficiaries face barriers in accessing medical care – and that includes contraceptive care. A new study finds that despite birth control being an essential health service, all primary care physicians that see them may not be offering Medicaid patients some of the most effective, longer-acting birth control methods. While nearly half (48%) of primary care physicians who treat Medicaid patients provided prescription contraception like the birth control pill, only 10% provided longer-acting methods like IUDs ...

Association of household opioid availability with opioid overdose

2023-03-17
About The Study: In this study of Oregon residents in households of at least two members, the findings suggest that household prescription availability is associated with increased odds of opioid overdose for others in the household, even if they do not have their own opioid prescription. These findings underscore the importance of educating patients about proper opioid disposal and the risks of household opioids.  Authors: Michelle A. Hendricks, Ph.D., of Comagine Health in Portland, Oregon, is the corresponding ...

Association of warm or cold air temperatures with lung function in young infants

2023-03-17
About The Study: Long-term heat and cold exposure from the second trimester until four weeks after birth was associated with newborn lung volumes, especially among female newborns, in this study of 343 mother-child pairs. The findings suggest an association between ambient temperature and newborns’ respiratory systems and underlines the vulnerability of pregnant women and their future children to climate change.  Authors: Ariane Guilbert, M.Sc., and Johanna Lepeule, Ph.D., of Universite Grenoble Alpes in La Tronche, France, are the corresponding authors.  To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/  (doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2023.3376) Editor’s ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

Drug helps reprogram macrophage immune cells, suppress prostate and bladder tumor growth

Green infrastructure plans need to consider historical racial inequalities, say researchers

ENDO 2024 press conferences to highlight male birth control, anti-obesity medications

Highly sensitive fiber optic gyroscope senses rotational ground motion around active volcano

Research reveals endurance exercise training impacts biological molecules

Does managing oxidative stress hold the key to effectively treating Alzheimer’s disease

Warming climate intensifies flash droughts worldwide

US public health preparedness and response to highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) viruses

DRI to host AWE+ wildfire summit

MD Anderson Research Highlights for May 21, 2024

Polymer research aims to expand possibilities in sensor technology

New therapeutic avenues in bone repair

Socioeconomic status transition throughout life and risk of dementia

Climbing the social ladder slows dementia, Japanese study reveals

Researchers discover hidden step in dinosaur feather evolution

Studies reveal cell-by-cell changes caused when pig hearts and kidneys are transplanted into humans

SRI earns FDA Orphan Drug Designation for pancreatic cancer

A new gene-editing system tackles complex diseases

Tracking down toxic metals from tobacco smoke

Clarifying the cellular mechanisms underlying periodontitis with an improved animal model

Age, race impact AI performance on digital mammograms

SwRI leads courses at 2024 Society of Tribologists & Lubrication Engineers Annual Meeting

Hope for a cure for visceral leishmaniasis, an often fatal infectious disease

How AI helps programming a quantum computer

New research reveals that prehistoric seafloor pockmarks off the California coast are maintained by powerful sediment flows

AI can help improve ER admission decisions, Mount Sinai study finds

Matcha mouthwash inhibits bacteria that causes periodontitis

Oncology events in Poland solidify collaboration with NCCN

City of Hope awarded $5.4 million CIRM grant to create a stem cell laboratory and expand access to state-of-the-art disease models and technology among a diverse scientific community

Meeting preview: Hot topics at NUTRITION 2024

[Press-News.org] Argonne hosts conference for undergraduate women in physics
Weekend-long event connects women with resources, community, information on graduate school and professionals in their field