PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

Running throughout middle age keeps ‘old’ adult-born neurons ‘wired’

‘Mice on the run:’ study reveals how exercise helps maintain memory function during aging

Running throughout middle age keeps ‘old’ adult-born neurons ‘wired’
2023-05-25
(Press-News.org) Aging often is accompanied by cognitive decline. Among the first structures of the brain affected are the hippocampus and adjacent cortices, areas essential for learning and memory. Deficits in cognitive ability are associated with reduced hippocampal volume and degradation of synaptic connectivity between the hippocampus and the (peri)-entorhinal cortex. 

Increasing evidence indicates that physical activity can delay or prevent these structural and functional reductions in older adults. A new study by Florida Atlantic University and CINVESTAV, Mexico City, Mexico, provides novel insight into the benefits of exercise, which should motivate adults to keep moving throughout their lifetime, especially during middle age.

For the study, researchers focused on the effects of long-term running on a network of new hippocampal neurons that were generated in young adult mice, at middle age. These “mice on the run” demonstrate that running throughout middle age keeps old adult-born neurons wired, which may prevent or delay aging-related memory loss and neurodegeneration.

Adult-born neurons are thought to contribute to hippocampus-dependent memory function and are believed to be temporarily important, during the so-called ‘critical period’ at about three to six weeks of cell age, when they can fleetingly display increased synaptic plasticity. However, these new neurons do remain present for many months, but it was unclear whether those born in early adulthood remain integrated into neural networks and whether their circuitry is modifiable by physical activity in middle age.

To address these questions, researchers used a unique rabies virus-based circuit tracing approach with a long-time interval between the initial labeling of new neurons and subsequent analysis of their neural circuitry in rodents. More than six months after tagging of the adult-born neurons with a fluorescent reporter vector, they identified and quantified the direct afferent inputs to these adult-born neurons within the hippocampus and (sub)cortical areas, when the mice were middle-aged. 

Results of the study, published in the journal eNeuro, show long-term running wires ‘old’ new neurons, born during early adulthood, into a network that is relevant to the maintenance of episodic memory encoding during aging.

“Long-term exercise profoundly benefits the aging brain and may prevent aging-related memory function decline by increasing the survival and modifying the network of the adult-born neurons born during early adulthood, and thereby facilitating their participation in cognitive processes,” said Henriette van Praag, Ph.D., corresponding author, an associate professor of biomedical science in FAU’s Schmidt College of Medicine and a member of the FAU Stiles-Nicholson Brain Institute.

Findings from the study showed long-term running significantly increased the number of adult-born neurons and enhanced the recruitment of presynaptic (sub)-cortical cells to their network.

“Long-term running may enhance pattern separation ability, our ability to distinguish between highly similar events and stimuli, a behavior closely linked to adult neurogenesis, which is among the first to display deficits indicative of age-related memory decline,” said Carmen Vivar, Ph.D., corresponding author, Department of Physiology, Biophysics and Neuroscience, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN in Mexico.

Aging-related memory function decline is associated with the degradation of synaptic inputs from the perirhinal and entorhinal cortex onto the hippocampus, brain areas that are essential for pattern separation, and contextual and spatial memory.

“We show that running also substantially increases the back-projection from the dorsal subiculum onto old adult-born granule cells,” said van Praag. “This connectivity may provide navigation-associated information and mediate the long-term running-induced improvement in spatial memory function.”

Results from the study show that running not only rescued perirhinal connectivity but also increased and altered the contribution of the entorhinal cortices to the network of old adult-born neurons.

“Our study provides insight as to how chronic exercise, beginning in young adulthood and continuing throughout middle age, helps maintain memory function during aging, emphasizing the relevance of including exercise in our daily lives,” said Vivar.

Study co-authors are Ben Peterson, Ph.D., currently a postdoc at UC Davis; Alejandro Pinto, FAU’s Schmidt College of Medicine and Stiles-Nicholson Brain Institute; and Emma Janke, a recent graduate of the University of Pennsylvania.

This research was supported in part by the FAU Stiles-Nicholson Brain Institute and the Jupiter Life Sciences Initiative (awarded to van Praag), and by the Fondo de Investigación Científica y Desarrollo Tecnológico del Cinvestav (Proyectos SEP-Cinvestav), (awarded to Vivar).

- FAU -

About the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine:

FAU’s Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine is one of approximately 156 accredited medical schools in the U.S. The college was launched in 2010, when the Florida Board of Governors made a landmark decision authorizing FAU to award the M.D. degree. After receiving approval from the Florida legislature and the governor, it became the 134th allopathic medical school in North America. With more than 70 full and part-time faculty and more than 1,300 affiliate faculty, the college matriculates 64 medical students each year and has been nationally recognized for its innovative curriculum. To further FAU’s commitment to increase much needed medical residency positions in Palm Beach County and to ensure that the region will continue to have an adequate and well-trained physician workforce, the FAU Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine Consortium for Graduate Medical Education (GME) was formed in fall 2011 with five leading hospitals in Palm Beach County. The Consortium currently has five Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited residencies including internal medicine, surgery, emergency medicine, psychiatry, and neurology.

 

About Florida Atlantic University:
Florida Atlantic University, established in 1961, officially opened its doors in 1964 as the fifth public university in Florida. Today, the University serves more than 30,000 undergraduate and graduate students across six campuses located along the southeast Florida coast. In recent years, the University has doubled its research expenditures and outpaced its peers in student achievement rates. Through the coexistence of access and excellence, FAU embodies an innovative model where traditional achievement gaps vanish. FAU is designated a Hispanic-serving institution, ranked as a top public university by U.S. News & World Report and a High Research Activity institution by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. For more information, visit www.fau.edu.

 

About Cinvestav:

The Center for Research and Advanced Studies (Cinvestav) was created by the Federal Government in 1961 as the first Mexican public institution offering only postgraduate research programs. Cinvestav is financed by the Mexican Ministry of Education. It´s mission is to perform cutting-edge basic and applied research, train high level human resources to provide the country with the necessary tools to offer scientific and technological solutions for our national problems. Cinvestav has presence in all Mexico with 10 campuses specialized in four different areas of research: Exact and Natural Sciences, Biological and Health Sciences, Technology and Sciences of engineering and Social Sciences and Humanities.

 

 

END


[Attachments] See images for this press release:
Running throughout middle age keeps ‘old’ adult-born neurons ‘wired’ Running throughout middle age keeps ‘old’ adult-born neurons ‘wired’ 2 Running throughout middle age keeps ‘old’ adult-born neurons ‘wired’ 3

ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

Afternoon exercise linked with greater improvements in blood sugar levels for patients with type 2 diabetes

2023-05-25
Over 37 million Americans have diabetes, and 90-95% of that population are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Lifestyle interventions, such as a healthy diet and a regular physical activity program, are methods to manage diabetes. A new study from a collaboration of investigators at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, a founding member of the Mass General Brigham healthcare system, and Joslin Diabetes Center, part of Beth Israel Lahey Health, uses data from the Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) study, a randomized controlled trial that compared an intensive lifestyle intervention with diabetes support and education in patients diagnosed ...

Your thoughts can harm your neck and back during lifting tasks

2023-05-25
COLUMBUS, Ohio – The mental distress of cognitive dissonance – encountering information that conflicts with how we act or what we believe – can lead to added pressure on the neck and low back during lifting and lowering tasks, new research suggests. When study participants were told they were performing poorly in a precision lowering experiment in the lab, after initially being told they were doing well, their movements were linked to increased loads on vertebrae in their neck and low back. Results showed that the higher the cognitive dissonance score, the greater the extent of loading on the upper ...

Tens of thousands of lives a year could be saved by new treatment protocol for brain hemorrhage

2023-05-25
The George Institute for Global Health today announced data from the phase III INTERACT3 study demonstrating that a new combination of treatments for stroke due to intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) significantly improves the chances of surviving without major disability. Results were presented today at the European Stroke Organisation Conference in Munich, Germany, and simultaneously published in The Lancet. The INTERACT3 study is the first-ever randomised controlled trial to show a clearly positive outcome for the treatment of ICH. Timely administration of the new treatment protocol – known as a Care Bundle – centred on the rapid control of ...

Electricity cheaper than diesel for heavy goods vehicles

Electricity cheaper than diesel for heavy goods vehicles
2023-05-25
In the past, it was considered unprofitable to electrify heavy goods vehicles that transport cargo over long distances. But now researchers at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden have shown that it can be cheaper to run heavy goods vehicles on electricity than on diesel. ‘I myself am surprised by the results and hope that more haulage companies and heavy goods vehicle manufacturers will be willing to invest in electrification now that we have shown that it can be cost-effective,’ says Johannes Karlsson, Doctoral student in Automatic Control Engineering at Chalmers. The transition ...

100 kW hydrogen fuel cell - digital twin in operation - using green hydrogen and waste plastic hydrogen

100 kW hydrogen fuel cell - digital twin in operation - using green hydrogen and waste plastic hydrogen
2023-05-25
The Tokyo Tech InfoSyEnergy Research and Education Consortium, the Tokyo Tech Academy of Energy and Informatics (Head of Consortium and Academy Director Manabu Ihara, Prof.), and several companies such as Toshiba Corporation and Toshiba Energy Systems & Solutions Corporation are jointly developing a platform "100 kW hydrogen fuel cell - digital twin" for optimizing the design and control of a 100 kw hydrogen fuel cell that seeks to balance carbon neutrality and economic advantage by mixing renewable energy hydrogen/waste ...

Study shows children may consider past choices when judging others

2023-05-25
A new study published in the journal Child Development from researchers at Boston College in Massachusetts, USA and the University of Queensland in Australia explores whether four- to nine-year-old-children consider past choices when making moral judgements of others. The findings showed that from the age of six, children considered what characters could have done when making judgement of how nice or mean they are behaving and that four and five- year-olds’ moral judgements were influenced only by ...

Study shows dementia risk increases the younger a person develops diabetes

2023-05-25
New research published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes [EASD]) shows an association between type 2 diabetes (T2D) and developing dementia in later life – with the risk of dementia increasing the earlier a person develops T2D. The study is by PhD student Jiaqi Hu and Professor Elizabeth Selvin of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA, and colleagues. Their study investigated the association between prediabetes and dementia. Prediabetes is an intermediate stage of high blood sugar, where blood sugar is high but has not yet crossed the threshold for T2D. Prediabetes ...

Nearly 70% of private label avocado oil rancid or mixed with other oils

2023-05-25
Avocado oil has become a popular choice for many people in recent years because of its heart-healthy benefits and versatility in cooking. However, not all avocado oil products on store shelves are created equal. Some products are labeled as “pure” avocado oil when they contain other oils or additives. No enforceable standards defining the chemical and physical characteristics of avocado oil exist yet. Researchers at the University of California, Davis, analyzed samples of 36 private label avocado oil products and graded them based on quality and purity. Private label products are made by a third-party processor and sold under a grocery store or retailer brand label. Their ...

Study finds ketamine is at least as effective as ECT for treating major depression

2023-05-25
A new study led by investigators from Mass General Brigham has found that subanesthetic intravenous ketamine was effective and not inferior to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) for the treatment of non-psychotic, treatment-resistant depression. Their results are published in the New England Journal of Medicine. “ECT has been the gold standard for treating severe depression for over 80 years,” said Amit Anand, MD, director of Psychiatry Translational Clinical Trials at Mass General Brigham and Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. “But it is also a controversial treatment because it can cause memory ...

Most effective ways of foraging can attract predators, scientists find

Most effective ways of foraging can attract predators, scientists find
2023-05-25
Animals using the most of efficient methods of searching for resources may well pay with their lives, scientists at the University of Bristol have discovered. The findings, published today in Behavioural Ecology, reveal why animals may not always use a searching strategy that maximises results. How animals move through their habitat, particularly in search for food, is a major question in biology, and has application in how animals will respond to environmental change. Numerous studies have demonstrated that a special kind of movement, known as Lévy motion, increases the ability to find resources because it includes long-distance moves ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

Polymer research aims to expand possibilities in sensor technology

New therapeutic avenues in bone repair

Socioeconomic status transition throughout life and risk of dementia

Climbing the social ladder slows dementia, Japanese study reveals

Researchers discover hidden step in dinosaur feather evolution

Studies reveal cell-by-cell changes caused when pig hearts and kidneys are transplanted into humans

SRI earns FDA Orphan Drug Designation for pancreatic cancer

A new gene-editing system tackles complex diseases

Tracking down toxic metals from tobacco smoke

Clarifying the cellular mechanisms underlying periodontitis with an improved animal model

Age, race impact AI performance on digital mammograms

SwRI leads courses at 2024 Society of Tribologists & Lubrication Engineers Annual Meeting

Hope for a cure for visceral leishmaniasis, an often fatal infectious disease

How AI helps programming a quantum computer

New research reveals that prehistoric seafloor pockmarks off the California coast are maintained by powerful sediment flows

AI can help improve ER admission decisions, Mount Sinai study finds

Matcha mouthwash inhibits bacteria that causes periodontitis

Oncology events in Poland solidify collaboration with NCCN

City of Hope awarded $5.4 million CIRM grant to create a stem cell laboratory and expand access to state-of-the-art disease models and technology among a diverse scientific community

Meeting preview: Hot topics at NUTRITION 2024

Study models how ketamine’s molecular action leads to its effects on the brain

A diaspora-based model of human migration

Black and Hispanic Americans experience wider temperature swings

Gamers say they hate ‘smurfing,’ but admit they do it

How immune cells recognize the abnormal metabolism of cancer cells

How plants mate for life and repel other suitors

3D printing robot uses AI machine learning for US Army research

Ruptured Achilles tendon shows faster repair amid plasma irradiation treatment

Screen time not the main factor making parent-child interactions worse, study finds

Improving the effectiveness of earthquake early warning systems

[Press-News.org] Running throughout middle age keeps ‘old’ adult-born neurons ‘wired’
‘Mice on the run:’ study reveals how exercise helps maintain memory function during aging