PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

ASCO23: ‘Better sexual health for female patients on endocrine therapy: Strategies across the age spectrum’

Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center’s Dr. Kristin Rojas addresses quality of life for patients receiving endocrine therapy for breast cancer, chairing a session that includes advances in improving sexual health, fertility preservation, and bone health.

ASCO23: ‘Better sexual health for female patients on endocrine therapy: Strategies across the age spectrum’
2023-05-25
(Press-News.org) MIAMI, FLORIDA (Strictly EMBARGOED Until May 25, 2023, at 5 P.M. EDT) – Breast cancer treatments that can save a woman’s life can seriously harm her sexual health, says Dr. Kristin E. Rojas, a breast cancer surgeon at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. Although doctors have not historically been prepared to help patients manage these toxic side effects, Rojas is leading efforts to turn the tide.

Rojas, both a fellowship-trained breast surgical oncologist and a gynecologic surgeon, is a national leader in treating sexual dysfunction in female patients undergoing cancer treatment. Other, more broadly recognized side effects of lifesaving estrogen-blocking medications – also known as endocrine therapy – include challenges with pregnancy planning for premenopausal patients and reduced bone mineralization. According to Rojas, all three of these subjects should be addressed as early as possible when planning a course of therapy for a breast cancer patient with an estrogen-sensitive tumor.

Rojas will identify risks posed by endocrine therapies, define symptoms and discuss treatment options in a presentation at the 2023 ASCO Annual Meeting in Chicago.

“By using endocrine therapy to treat hormone-positive breast cancers, we’re putting many young women into menopause, but we’re not doing a great job preparing them for it,” said Rojas, who created a program to address women’s sexual health after cancer treatment, the Menopause Urogenital Sexual Health and Intimacy Clinic (MUSIC) at Sylvester. Faced with unexpectedly high demand, the clinic needed to expand soon after opening in 2020. Since Rojas expanded the program by training additional experts to accommodate this great need, the MUSIC program has become a prototype for similar programs across the country. It remains the only women’s oncology-focused sexual health program led by a dual-trained surgeon in the United States.

“Patients are often hesitant to bring up sexual health issues with their providers, and that’s why we created this groundbreaking program where patients can openly discuss these issues in a one-on-one survivorship program. If we don’t address these common concerns experienced by more than 80% of female survivors of cancer, patient adherence to endocrine treatment decreases, and the progress we have made in improving breast cancer survival is impeded,” Rojas said.

Rojas’ ASCO presentation will help providers anticipate and treat the most common side effects experienced by patients on endocrine therapy (or estrogen-blocking medications), formulate a personalized treatment plan, guide patients toward evidence-based practices and away from potentially harmful “fringe” therapies, and troubleshoot common pitfalls encountered in the treatment of menopausal symptoms.

Among specific topics:

Hot flashes – causes, triggers and treatments. Vaginal dryness and painful sex – causes, irritants, and changes to the vaginal microbiome. Genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM) – causes, treatments, lubricants, devices and medication options. Products, “therapies” and devices to avoid. Infertility risk and options for fertility preservation. Reduced bone mineralization and increased fracture risk – monitoring and prevention strategies. Rojas’ presentation is part of a session she will chair: “A Juggling Act: Managing the Toxicity of Estrogen Deprivation for Patients With Breast Cancer,” Education Session E451. It will begin at 8 a.m. June 5, 2023 (CDT), part of the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

# # #

MEDIA CONTACT:
Rhonda Curry
Rhonda.Curry@miami.edu
(206) 696-8684

(OR)

Sandy Van
scv46@miami.edu
808.206.4576

(Strictly EMBARGOED Until May 25, 2023, at 5 P.M. EDT)

 

END


[Attachments] See images for this press release:
ASCO23: ‘Better sexual health for female patients on endocrine therapy: Strategies across the age spectrum’ ASCO23: ‘Better sexual health for female patients on endocrine therapy: Strategies across the age spectrum’ 2

ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

ASCO23: ‘Safety & efficacy of the novel BRAF inhibitor FORE8394 in patients with advanced solid & CNS tumors’

ASCO23: ‘Safety & efficacy of the novel BRAF inhibitor FORE8394 in patients with advanced solid & CNS tumors’
2023-05-25
MIAMI, FLORIDA (EMBARGOED UNTIL MAY 25, 2023, AT 5 P.M. ET) – An early-phase study led by researchers at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine along with other Cancer Centers, suggests that an experimental therapy may have promising results in treating cancers with BRAF gene alterations – including certain mutations not previously targeted by BRAF inhibitors. The Phase 1/2a study looking at safety and dosing enrolled 113 patients and targeted a wide range of cancers, including high-grade glioma, low-grade glioma, colorectal cancer, papillary thyroid cancer, melanoma, pancreatic cancer, ovarian cancer, non-small cell ...

MD Anderson Research Highlights: ASCO 2023 Special Edition

2023-05-25
CHICAGO ― The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Research Highlights showcases the latest breakthroughs in cancer care, research and prevention. These advances are made possible through seamless collaboration between MD Anderson’s world-leading clinicians and scientists, bringing discoveries from the lab to the clinic and back. This special edition features presentations by MD Anderson researchers at the 2023 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting. In addition to these studies, forthcoming press releases will highlight groundbreaking clinical research, including Phase III trial results evaluating ...

Penn Medicine at the 2023 ASCO Annual Meeting

2023-05-25
CHICAGO –  Researchers from the Abramson Cancer Center and Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania will present data on the latest advances in clinical cancer research at the 2023 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting from June 2-6 in Chicago, Illinois. Follow us on Twitter @PennMDForum and @PennCancer for updates. Expert Interviews Experts from the Perelman School of Medicine are available to comment on a wide range of topics in cancer science and medicine during the meeting on site and by video call, telephone, or email. To arrange interviews, please contact Meagan Raeke at Meagan.Raeke@pennmedicine.upenn.edu ...

Internal job candidates have a leg up

2023-05-25
AUSTIN, Texas – Internal job candidates have an advantage over external candidates, because they tend to work harder shortly before a hiring decision, according to new research from The University of Texas at Austin. This is true even when an internal candidate’s skills are inferior. Eric Chan, assistant professor of accounting at the McCombs School of Business, found that when a new job is on the line, employees will exert more effort to increase their chances of promotion — especially right before the decision. And managers are more likely ...

C. difficile, emerging pathogens, genomics, and antimicrobial resistance

C. difficile, emerging pathogens, genomics, and antimicrobial resistance
2023-05-25
A new study published in the peer-reviewed OMICS: A Journal of Integrative Biology identified genes for virulence and antimicrobial resistance in two bacteria that co-occur with C. difficile, suggesting these pathogens as emerging potential threats in planetary health. Click here to read the article now. Thokur Sreepathy Murali, PhD, Ankit Singh Tanwar, Padival Shruptha and colleagues from Manipal Academy of Higher Education, India, and co-author Angela Brand, MD, PhD, MPH from Maastricht University, The Netherlands, performed comparative genome analyses of three Clostridia species, ...

Groundbreaking images of root chemicals offer new insights on plant growth

Groundbreaking images of root chemicals offer new insights on plant growth
2023-05-25
On a sunny springtime stroll through a park, it’s easy to ignore the parts of plants that are hidden from view. Plant biologists see things differently. They look below the surface where plant roots are organized in elaborate systems that are critical to the organism’s development. Intricately organized tree root systems, for example, can span as far underground as the tree grows high above the soil. Applying an advanced imaging technology to plant roots, researchers at the University of California San Diego and Stanford University ...

LJI-led team wins top Nucleate honors for virus vaccine development proposal

2023-05-25
LA JOLLA, CA—A San Diego team, led by scientists at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI), has won the top prizes in the Nucleate Activator competition. Out of 1,000 initial competitors, the LJI team advanced to the final four teams and swept all the prizes they entered for. Their winning research proposal outlines how scientists could stop dengue virus and Zika virus by developing sophisticated vaccines that activate both B cells and T cells. Nucleate is a student-led, non-profit organization dedicated to empowering early-stage, ...

Hydrogen battery: Storing hydrogen in coal may help power clean energy economy

Hydrogen battery: Storing hydrogen in coal may help power clean energy economy
2023-05-25
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — The quest to develop hydrogen as a clean energy source that could curb our dependence on fossil fuels may lead to an unexpected place — coal. A team of Penn State scientists found that coal may represent a potential way to store hydrogen gas, much like batteries store energy for future use, addressing a major hurdle in developing a clean energy supply chain. “We found that coal can be this geological hydrogen battery,” said Shimin Liu, associate professor of energy and mineral engineering at Penn State. “You could inject and store the hydrogen energy and have it there when you need to use it.” Hydrogen ...

Artificial muscle fibers could serve as cell scaffolds

2023-05-25
In two new studies, North Carolina State University researchers designed and tested a series of textile fibers that can change shape and generate force like a muscle. In the first study, the researchers focused on the materials’ influence on artificial muscles’ strength and contraction length. The findings could help researchers tailor the fibers for different applications. In the second, proof-of-concept study, the researchers tested their fibers as scaffolds for live cells. Their findings suggest the fibers – known as “fiber robots” ...

Argonne hosts demo day for Lab-Embedded Entrepreneurship Program

2023-05-25
Twenty startups will present their technologies for a clean energy future at this year’s Lab-Embedded Entrepreneur Program (LEEP) Demo Day, June 7, in Chicago. LEEP connects entrepreneurs with resources and innovation ecosystems at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national labs.  In addition to demos from companies currently participating in LEEP, the event at the Sheraton Grand Chicago Riverwalk will also feature a panel discussion where program graduates share insights and advice about successful entrepreneurship. The technologies on display span renewable energy, materials for clean energy and water, batteries, ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

USC medical school dean appointed to CIRM board

Antibiotic pollution disrupts the gut microbiome and blocks memory in aquatic snails 

Researchers expose new symbiosis origin theories, identify experimental systems for plant life

Q&A: How AI affects kids’ creativity

Virtual lab meetings improve undergraduate research experience and foster diversity in academia

Study shows effectiveness of updated COVID-19 vaccines wanes moderately over time, is lower against currently circulating variants

Researchers expose new ‘origin’ theories, identify experimental systems for plant life

Researchers honored for outstanding contributions to cancer care

A new Hungarian method may aid protein research

AIM algorithm enhances super-resolution microscope images in real time

Rice researchers uncover surprising role of opioid receptors in gut development

Cleveland Clinic and IBM researchers apply quantum computing methods to protein structure prediction

Blood flow makes waves across the surface of the mouse brain

More out-of-state patients seek abortions in Washington state

Researchers take step toward development of universal COVID-19 antibodies

Do epilepsy medications taken during pregnancy affect a child’s creativity?

First hints of memory problems associated with changes in the brain

Mass General Brigham study finds that memory complaints can predict biological changes in the brain

JPMorgan Chase, Argonne and Quantinuum show theoretical quantum speedup with the quantum approximate optimization algorithm

AI browser plug-ins to help consumers improve digital privacy literacy, combat manipulative design

Grant funds CU project to develop novel mechanism to expand NF1 treatments

A drying Salton Sea pollutes neighboring communities

Wild megalopolis: Study shows unexpected pockets of biodiversity pepper Los Angeles

Slugs and snails love the city, unlike other animals

Ideas that cross international borders may have powerful impact on elections

YouTube’s comments section: Political echo chamber or constructive cross-partisan forum?

Babies babble squeals and growls in clustering patterns observable from birth through the first year, suggesting this active vocal exploration is important to speech development

The sweat bee, H. rubicundus, is less sociable in Scotland than in Cornwall, but is genetically differentiated and genetically isolated too

Smartphone use may help adolescents feel better - at least in the moment, finds real-time survey of US teens

Public have no difficulty getting to grips with an extra thumb, study finds

[Press-News.org] ASCO23: ‘Better sexual health for female patients on endocrine therapy: Strategies across the age spectrum’
Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center’s Dr. Kristin Rojas addresses quality of life for patients receiving endocrine therapy for breast cancer, chairing a session that includes advances in improving sexual health, fertility preservation, and bone health.