PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

Developing technologies to reduce the cost of green hydrogen production

Substantially reducing the amount of platinum and iridium used in water electrolysis devices, Reducing iridium usage to one-tenth of current levels while maintaining high performance

Developing technologies to reduce the cost of green hydrogen production
2023-06-02
(Press-News.org) Green hydrogen, which produces hydrogen without the use of fossil fuels or the emission of carbon dioxide, has become increasingly important in recent years as part of efforts to realize a decarbonized economy. However, due to the high production cost of water electrolysis devices that produce green hydrogen, the economic feasibility of green hydrogen has not been very high. However, the development of a technology that drastically reduces the amount of rare metals such as iridium and platinum used in polymer electrolyte membrane water electrolysis devices is opening the way to lower production costs.

A research team led by Dr. Hyun S. Park and Sung Jong Yoo of the Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Research Center at the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) announced that they have developed a technology that can significantly reduce the amount of platinum and iridium, precious metals used in the electrode protection layer of polymer electrolyte membrane water electrolysis devices, and secure performance and durability on par with existing devices. In particular, unlike previous studies that focused on reducing the amount of iridium catalyst while maintaining the structure that uses a large amount of platinum and gold as the electrode protection layer, the researchers replaced the precious metal in the electrode protection layer with inexpensive iron nitride having large surface area and uniformly coated a small amount of iridium catalyst on top of it, greatly increasing the economic efficiency of the electrolysis device.

The polymer electrolyte membrane water electrolysis device is a device that produces high-purity hydrogen and oxygen by decomposing water using electricity supplied by renewable energy such as solar power, and it plays a role in supplying hydrogen to various industries such as steelmaking and chemicals. In addition, it is advantageous for energy conversion to store renewable energy as hydrogen energy, so increasing the economic efficiency of this device is very important for the realization of the green hydrogen economy.

In a typical electrolysis device, there are two electrodes that produce hydrogen and oxygen, and for the oxygen generating electrode, which operates in a highly corrosive environment, gold or platinum is coated on the surface of the electrode at 1 mg/cm2 as a protective layer to ensure durability and production efficiency, and 1-2 mg/cm2 of iridium catalyst is coated on top. The precious metals used in these electrolysis devices have very low reserves and production, which is a major factor hindering the widespread adoption of green hydrogen production devices.

To improve the economics of water electrolysis, the team replaced the rare metals gold and platinum used as a protective layer for the oxygen electrode in polymer electrolyte membrane hydrogen production devices with inexpensive iron nitride (Fe2N). To do so, the team developed a composite process that first uniformly coats the electrode with iron oxide, which has low electrical conductivity, and then converts the iron oxide to iron nitride to increase its conductivity. The team also developed a process that uniformly coats an iridium catalyst about 25 nanometers (nm) thick on top of the iron nitride protective layer, reducing the amount of iridium catalyst to less than 0.1 mg/cm2, resulting in an electrode with high hydrogen production efficiency and durability.

The developed electrode replaces the gold or platinum used as a protective layer for the oxygen generating electrode with non-precious metal nitrides while maintaining similar performance to existing commercial electrolysis units, and reduces the amount of iridium catalyst to 10% of the existing level. In addition, the electrolysis unit with the new components was operated for more than 100 hours to verify its initial stability.

"Reducing the amount of iridium catalyst and developing alternative materials for the platinum protective layer are essential for the economical and widespread use of polymer electrolyte membrane green hydrogen production devices, and the use of inexpensive iron nitride instead of platinum is of great significance," said Dr. Hyun S. Park of KIST. "After further observing the performance and durability of the electrode, we will apply it to commercial devices in the near future."

The research was supported by the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy (Minister Lee, Chang-Yang) and KIST Major Projects, and the results were published online in the latest issue of the international scientific journal Applied Catalysis B:Environmental (IF: 24.319, top 0.926% in JCR).

###

KIST was established in 1966 as the first government-funded research institute in Korea. KIST now strives to solve national and social challenges and secure growth engines through leading and innovative research. For more information, please visit KIST’s website at https://eng.kist.re.kr/

This research was conducted through the KIST Major Projects supported by the Ministry of Science and ICT (Minister Lee Jong-ho), and the results were published online in the latest issue of the international scientific journal Applied Catalysis B:Environmental (IF: 24.319, top 0.926% in JCR).

END

[Attachments] See images for this press release:
Developing technologies to reduce the cost of green hydrogen production Developing technologies to reduce the cost of green hydrogen production 2 Developing technologies to reduce the cost of green hydrogen production 3

ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

ASCO 2023 - Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center experts available for interviews

2023-06-02
Sarcomas Dr. Jonathan C. Trent, a medical oncologist specializing in Sarcoma and Connective Tissue Medical Oncology at Sylvester, is available to discuss a wide range of issues related to Sarcoma research and experimental therapeutics. He and collaborators are involved in multiple ASCO23 presentations, including: Multi-omic characterization of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in a large real-world patient cohort. Outcomes in patients with advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumor who did not have ...

Alcohol dependency in adolescence, but not consumption, linked with later depression risk

2023-06-02
Adolescents who show signs of alcohol dependence are more likely to develop depression by their mid-20s, according to a new study led by UCL (University College London) and University of Bristol researchers. Drinking large amounts of alcohol regularly, but with no signs of dependency, did not predict depression risk, according to the findings published in The Lancet Psychiatry. Co-lead author Dr Gemma Lewis (UCL Psychiatry) said: “By using a large, longitudinal dataset, we have found evidence that problematic drinking patterns in late adolescence may increase the risk of developing ...

Why we need to fall out of love with flaky white fish - study

2023-06-02
The UK’s growing mismatch between the fish we catch and the fish we want to eat has clear implications for our future food security, according to new research.  Led by the University of Essex and the Centre for Environment Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas), the study, published in the international peer-reviewed journal Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries, for the first time offers a comprehensive, long-term analysis of how major policy changes in the past 120 years have influenced patterns in UK seafood production, trade and consumption.  It shows that even if we changed our fish-eating habits away from choosing flaky white fish such as cod ...

UK’s poorest children likelier to have less understanding of personal finances, study finds

2023-06-02
A new study of 3,745 families from across the UK demonstrates a “sizeable” gap in the financial knowledge of children depending on which socio-economic group they come from. The research highlights significant inequalities in young people’s financial capabilities, with the results pointing toward disadvantaged children not developing key financial skills. In findings published in the peer-reviewed British Journal of Educational Studies, an expert team from UCL are calling for a greater emphasis on developing financial skills amongst children starting at primary school, particularly aimed towards those from disadvantaged social backgrounds, with “a particular need ...

ASCO 23: Thyroid cancer precision approaches that incorporate targeted therapies and other treatments are changing the surgeon’s role

ASCO 23: Thyroid cancer precision approaches that incorporate targeted therapies and other treatments are changing the surgeon’s role
2023-06-02
DOWNLOADABLE B-ROLL/VIDEO   MIAMI, FLORIDA (June 1, 2023) – Historically, surgery was the first line of treatment for patients with thyroid cancer. Now, as targeted therapies and other new medications emerge, surgery for certain patients may become more of a secondary option if those treatments fail. This new context could potentially change how some procedures are conducted. Otolaryngologist and head and neck surgeon Dr. Zoukaa Sargi, will join a June 2 panel discussion on thyroid cancer care ...

Medical College of Wisconsin cancer researcher & key investigator on study of Pirtobrutinib, now FDA approved for patients previously treated for Mantle Cell Lymphoma

2023-06-02
In a multicenter phase 1 and 2 trial (BRUIN, NCT03740529), researchers from leading cancer centers across the globe, including the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW) in Milwaukee, tested Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor (BTKi), pirtobrutinib, in patients with pre-treated mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). Results of the study, which assessed the efficacy of the drug in a cohort of 90 patients with poor survival prognosis, demonstrated the reversible BTKi drug to be both safe and effective in achieving inhibition of defective B-cells. The results were published by the Journal of Clinical Oncology on May 16.   MCL is an aggressive, rare subtype of ...

Researchers develop new detection tool for beech leaf disease’s nematode pest

Researchers develop new detection tool for beech leaf disease’s nematode pest
2023-06-02
Beech leaf disease is an emerging threat to North American forest ecosystems. It was first discovered in northeastern Ohio in 2012, and has already spread to 12 additional U.S. states and Canadian provinces. At first the cause of the disease was unknown, and the sick and dying trees were diagnosed on symptoms alone: Dark banding along the leaf veins and shriveled, leathery leaves. But in 2017, nematodes were found in diseased leaves, and by 2020 we had the answer: A newly recognized subspecies of the wormlike creature, Litylenchus crenatae mccannii, was definitely associated with the symptoms.  In order to monitor the spread of the disease, to understand the nemotode’s ...

St. Jude finds NLRP12 as a new drug target for infection, inflammation and hemolytic diseases

St. Jude finds NLRP12 as a new drug target for infection, inflammation and hemolytic diseases
2023-06-01
(MEMPHIS, Tenn. – June 01, 2023) Infections and other diseases can cause red blood cells to rupture, releasing the oxygen-binding molecule hemoglobin, which breaks down into heme. Free heme can cause significant inflammation and organ damage, leading to morbidity and mortality. Researchers from St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital discovered NLRP12, an innate immune pattern recognition receptor, to be the key molecule responsible for inducing inflammatory cell death and pathology in response to heme combined with other cellular damage or infection. The finding provides a new potential drug target to prevent morbidity in certain illnesses. ...

Ancient viruses discovered in coral symbionts’ DNA

Ancient viruses discovered in coral symbionts’ DNA
2023-06-01
HOUSTON – (June 1, 2023) – An international team of marine biologists has discovered the remnants of ancient RNA viruses embedded in the DNA of symbiotic organisms living inside reef-building corals. The RNA fragments are from viruses that infected the symbionts as long ago as 160 million years. The discovery is described in an open-access study published this week in the Nature journal Communications Biology, and it could help scientists understand how corals and their partners fight off viral infections today. But it was a surprising find because most RNA viruses are not known ...

NEC Society launches neonatal probiotics toolkit

NEC Society launches neonatal probiotics toolkit
2023-06-01
Davis, CA - The Necrotizing Enterocolitis (NEC) Society is thrilled to release the Neonatal Probiotics Toolkit. The Toolkit provides structure to clinicians in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) as they consider the complex process and decision of whether to implement probiotics to help prevent NEC. The Toolkit is not a recommendation for or against the routine use of probiotics in the NICU, nor for or against the use of any product or preparation method.  NICUs and clinicians are encouraged to use the Toolkit to foster thoughtful, intentional dialogue and inclusive conversations amongst key stakeholders in the NICU, including the need for patient-families to understand ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

Bioinformatics approach could help optimize soldiers’ training for improved readiness and recovery

Earth scientists describe a new kind of volcanic eruption

Warmer wetter climate predicted to bring societal and ecological impact to the Tibetan Plateau

Feeding infants peanut products protects against allergy into adolescence

Who will like beetle skewers? What Europeans think about alternative protein food

ETRI wins ‘iF Design Award’ for mobile collaborative robot

Combating carbon footprint: novel reactor system converts carbon dioxide into usable fuel

Investigating the origin of circatidal rhythms in freshwater snails

Altering cellular interactions around amyloid plaques may offer novel Alzheimer’s treatment strategies

Brain damage reveals part of the brain necessary for helping others

Surprising properties of elastic turbulence discovered

Study assesses cancer-related care at US hospitals predominantly serving minority populations compared with non-minority serving hospitals

First in-human investigator-initiated clinical trial to launch for refractory prostate cancer patients: Novel alpha therapy targets prostate-specific membrane antigen

Will generative AI change the way universities communicate?

Artificial Intelligence could help cure loneliness, says expert

Echidnapus identified from an ‘Age of Monotremes’

Semaglutide may protect kidney function in individuals with overweight or obesity and cardiovascular disease

New technique detects novel biomarkers for kidney diseases with nephrotic syndrome

Political elites take advantage of anti-partisan protests to disrupt politics

Tiny target discovered on RNA to short-circuit inflammation, UC Santa Cruz researchers find

Charge your laptop in a minute? Supercapacitors can help; new research offers clues

Scientists discover CO2 and CO ices in outskirts of solar system

Theory and experiment combine to shine a new light on proton spin

PKMYT1, a potential ‘Achilles heel’ of treatment resistant ER+ breast cancers with the poorest prognosis

PH-binding motifs as a platform for drug design: Lessons from protease-activated receptors (PARs)

Virginia Tech researcher creates new tool to move tiny bioparticles

On repeat: Biologists observe recurring evolutionary changes, over time, in stick insects

Understanding a broken heart

Genetic cause of rare childhood immune disorders discovered

With wobbling stars, astronomers gauge mass of 126 exoplanets and find 15 new ones

[Press-News.org] Developing technologies to reduce the cost of green hydrogen production
Substantially reducing the amount of platinum and iridium used in water electrolysis devices, Reducing iridium usage to one-tenth of current levels while maintaining high performance