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Learn the intricacies in solving problems related to energy transfer

Learn the intricacies in solving problems related to energy transfer
2023-09-15
(Press-News.org) Volume 2 of the series on Solved Problems in Transport Phenomena is out. This unique compendium covers energy transfer at the microscopic and macroscopic levels in a format that does not overwhelm students with a large repertoire of problems. It uses clear highlights and easy-to-follow concept presentations to help students grasp the methodology in problem solving.

Solved Problems in Transport Phenomena: Energy Transfer shows the students how to tackle a problem related to heat transfer as if they were going to solve it for the first time in their lives. A balanced approach between obtaining the model equation representing a physical phenomenon and exploiting various mathematical techniques to solve them is employed in the book. This approach helps students to gain physical intuition and mathematical skills.

The book can be used by upper undergraduate and graduate level students in transport phenomena and heat transfer courses in conjunction with standard textbooks in the fields of chemical, mechanical, petroleum, and environmental engineering. Carefully selected example problems by Tosun show students the three stages of problem-solving, namely formulation, simplification, and mathematical solution.

Solved Problems in Transport Phenomena: Energy Transfer retails for US$138 / £120 (hardcover) and is also available in electronic formats. To order or know more about the book, visit http://www.worldscientific.com/worldscibooks/10.1142/13353.

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About the Author

İsmail Tosun is an emeritus professor of chemical engineering at Middle East Technical University (METU), Turkey. He received his BS and MS degrees from METU, and a PhD degree from the University of Akron, USA, all in chemical engineering. His research interests are mathematical modeling, solid-liquid separation processes, and multiphase transport phenomena.

About World Scientific Publishing Co.

World Scientific Publishing is a leading international independent publisher of books and journals for the scholarly, research and professional communities. World Scientific collaborates with prestigious organisations like the Nobel Foundation and US National Academies Press to bring high quality academic and professional content to researchers and academics worldwide. The company publishes about 600 books and over 170 journals in various fields annually. To find out more about World Scientific, please visit www.worldscientific.com.

For more information, contact WSPC Communications at communications@wspc.com.

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[Press-News.org] Learn the intricacies in solving problems related to energy transfer