PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

Employee surveys may miss out on uncovering toxic leadership practices

Binghamton School of Management research explores how simplistic employee surveys may overlook negative leadership practices in an organization

Employee surveys may miss out on uncovering toxic leadership practices
2023-09-18
(Press-News.org) BINGHAMTON, N.Y. -- Standardized and overly simplistic questionnaires are only scratching the surface of what employees think of their leaders, according to new research from Binghamton University’s School of Management (SOM), and negative behavior may be slipping through the cracks.

As a result, the research finds, organizations may be missing out on critical information that could be keeping toxic leaders in positions of power.

“Instead of capturing actual leader behaviors, ratings might simply reflect whether a person likes their leader,” said Mengying Li, a Leadership and Organization Science doctoral student who conducted the research with Assistant Professor Bryan Acton. “People may just generally experience more of the positive stuff and are less likely to recall specifically negative leadership behaviors, especially if they’re overall happy in their workplace.”

Employee questionnaires have long proven useful in most leadership studies, but the SOM researchers found participants in such surveys often rely on their long-term memory to rank harmful leadership practices. They turn to their broad perceptions of how a manager performs the job, and critical leadership missteps may be overlooked if such negative encounters are few and far between.

Li’s and Acton’s paper was part of a larger set of studies involving fellow SOM faculty and other researchers, all supported by a grant from the U.S. Army Research Institute. Li recently presented the research to the Academy of Management, which placed it on its “Best Papers” list out of about 3,000 submissions.

The research uncovered a need for more critical thinking when companies assess leadership performance, Acton and Li said. Their findings could be used to help organizations and companies, even the military, make decisions about promotions or salary increases, which could affect employee turnover or whether leaders who engage in toxic management practices remain in their roles.

“There’s a big difference between how people perceive a leader to be doing and how effective that leader truly is in that role,” said Acton, whose expertise centers on organizational behavior and leadership. “If we are promoting the wrong people, keeping bad leaders in their positions and making important decisions based on an overly simplistic approach to leadership studies, that could be a problem.”

To uncover how memory impacts the perception of toxic versus ethical leadership practices, the SOM researchers began by soliciting feedback from 200 participants whose occupations ranged from sales, accounting, web development and engineering.

Participants were questioned about negative leadership scenarios such as “my manager publicly belittles subordinates” or “my manager has explosive outbursts” as part of the research. In response, about 10 percent reported experiencing negative sentiments toward their supervisor.

Most participants described something positive, such as saying their supervisor gives back to their community, for example.

Since they didn’t seem to dwell on any specific negative incidents, Li said, that could mean employees depended on generalized impressions of their supervisor to form their opinions.

If there’s one key takeaway for managers at companies, Acton said, it’s that analyzing individual leader behaviors and asking employees to answer more pointed questions in these surveys are more likely to allow for meaningful improvements in leadership.

“We need to think more critically about the way we measure negative forms of leadership because people are saying bad leadership is not happening,” Acton said. “If I’m perceiving the leader as good, does that mean the leader is actually doing well? We should be careful about the conclusions we draw based on a person’s perception of a leader.”

END

[Attachments] See images for this press release:
Employee surveys may miss out on uncovering toxic leadership practices Employee surveys may miss out on uncovering toxic leadership practices 2

ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

Key to solving Libyan conflict lies within the country, analysis says

2023-09-18
The key to solving the Libyan political conflict lies within the country rather than with the international community, analysis says. Electoral and governance deadlock has been blamed for the devastating impact of the flooding in the country. The “contentment” of the political elite and others with the status quo - given the currently limited levels of violence and the rising global prices of energy since the outbreak of Russia’s war on Ukraine - explains the general lack of a genuine commitment to relaunch the transition and electoral roadmap, ...

Personalized combination treatment turns on an immunometabolic switch to effectively control an aggressive form of prostate cancer

2023-09-18
Researchers at the University of Chicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center established “proof-of-concept” for a new treatment approach that was able to effectively treat the most aggressive forms of prostate cancer. The treatment showed complete tumor control and long-lasting survival without side effects in a mouse model of advanced prostate cancer. These findings, which were published online September 18, 2023, in Clinical Cancer Research, warrant further investigation in human clinical trials, the researchers concluded. Strategies to overcome resistance “Prostate cancer in the metastatic ...

Power meals: Child care-provided meals are associated with improved child and family health

Power meals: Child care-provided meals are associated with improved child and family health
2023-09-18
Philadelphia, September 18, 2023 – Very young children who attend child care and receive onsite meals and snacks were more likely to be food secure and in good health, and less likely to be admitted after a hospital emergency department visit than children in child care whose meals and snacks were provided from home, according to a new study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, published by Elsevier. These potential benefits could extend beyond the children themselves to their families, including through possible reductions in stress, and to society as a whole through potentially significant healthcare cost savings. Lead author Stephanie ...

DOE backs Rice study of how soils store carbon

DOE backs Rice study of how soils store carbon
2023-09-18
HOUSTON – (Sept. 18, 2023) – Two Rice University scientists have received a 3-year grant from the Department of Energy (DOE) to investigate a form of carbon storage that is as little understood as it is ubiquitous: soil. Mark Torres, an assistant professor of Earth, environmental and planetary sciences, and Evan Ramos, a postdoctoral fellow in the Torres lab, will track how key minerals form in a watershed to build a fuller picture of the processes that allow soil to store carbon as organic matter. “Soil on Earth contains three times more carbon than the atmosphere,” Ramos said. “We ...

University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus receives $54 million from NIH

2023-09-18
The National Institutes of Health has awarded $54 million over a seven-year period to the CCTSI at CU Anschutz. The grant from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) will fuel biomedical research and training across the state. This is the fourth consecutive time the NIH has funded the CCTSI since 2008 through its Clinical Translational Science Award (CTSA) program. “This powerful grant will allow the University of Colorado to conduct leading-edge research that can directly impact health and patient care, reduce health disparities across our state and remain poised to respond to public ...

UNIST and Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital collaborate on advanced 3D printing medical device technology

UNIST and Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital collaborate on advanced 3D printing medical device technology
2023-09-18
UNIST, in collaboration with Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, has embarked on an exciting joint venture to research and develop advanced 3D printing medical device technology. The UNIST 3D Printing Convergence Technology Center recently signed a business agreement with the Medical Device Usability Test Center at Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital. This agreement outlines their collaborative efforts in various areas, including the research and development of 3D printing-based medical devices as well as support for the commercialization of domestically developed devices. Notably, Yangsan Pusan National University ...

The missing link to make easy protein sequencing possible?

The missing link to make easy protein sequencing possible?
2023-09-18
There has been a real race among scientists to create a technology that enables easy protein sequencing. Professor of Chemical Biology Giovanni Maglia of the University of Groningen has now found the missing piece in the puzzle: a way to transport a protein through a nanopore, which allows sequencing of proteins in a simple, handheld device.  DNA sequencing has been a revolution in how we understand life, and sequencing proteins is the next holy grail. Maglia explains: ‘DNA is mostly static. The processes in our cells are executed by proteins: they do the actual work. ...

Ochsner Health to integrate generative AI into patient messaging

2023-09-18
This month, Ochsner Health is launching a pilot program that uses AI to draft simple messages to patients in the MyOchsner app portal. A small group of Ochsner clinicians will participate in testing a new Epic feature that drafts responses to routine patient requests, which will then be reviewed and edited by the clinicians. The feature is meant to speed up app response time to patients and allows doctors to spend more time with patients. “Ochsner has long been a leader in using digital tools to improve the patient experience,” said Ochsner ...

Using augmented reality to make Parkinson's disease physical therapy more accessible

Using augmented reality to make Parkinsons disease physical therapy more accessible
2023-09-18
An augmented-reality headset is an effective digital tool for improving posture and gait in people with Parkinson’s disease, according to a recent Cleveland Clinic trial. Findings were published in Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair. Augmented reality, or AR, allows users to complete digital programs projected into the world around them. The “Dual-task augmented Reality Treatment” (DART) uses the Microsoft HoloLens2 to run patients through dual-task training (DTT), a series of tasks designed to engage the brain and body simultaneously. Activities ...

State grant allows for UC’s continued research on firefighter protective gear

2023-09-18
A team of UC researchers across three colleges has been awarded an additional $1.5 million state grant to continue research on improving firefighter protective gear. In 2022, the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC) awarded a UC team an initial $1.2 million to provide proof of concept on the development of a firefighter jacket liner that brings a firefighter’s body temperature down through advanced cooling technology and protects the body from other external hazards. That grant, and the new $1.5 million grant to carry the proof of concept to commercialization, ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

Polymer research aims to expand possibilities in sensor technology

New therapeutic avenues in bone repair

Socioeconomic status transition throughout life and risk of dementia

Climbing the social ladder slows dementia, Japanese study reveals

Researchers discover hidden step in dinosaur feather evolution

Studies reveal cell-by-cell changes caused when pig hearts and kidneys are transplanted into humans

SRI earns FDA Orphan Drug Designation for pancreatic cancer

A new gene-editing system tackles complex diseases

Tracking down toxic metals from tobacco smoke

Clarifying the cellular mechanisms underlying periodontitis with an improved animal model

Age, race impact AI performance on digital mammograms

SwRI leads courses at 2024 Society of Tribologists & Lubrication Engineers Annual Meeting

Hope for a cure for visceral leishmaniasis, an often fatal infectious disease

How AI helps programming a quantum computer

New research reveals that prehistoric seafloor pockmarks off the California coast are maintained by powerful sediment flows

AI can help improve ER admission decisions, Mount Sinai study finds

Matcha mouthwash inhibits bacteria that causes periodontitis

Oncology events in Poland solidify collaboration with NCCN

City of Hope awarded $5.4 million CIRM grant to create a stem cell laboratory and expand access to state-of-the-art disease models and technology among a diverse scientific community

Meeting preview: Hot topics at NUTRITION 2024

Study models how ketamine’s molecular action leads to its effects on the brain

A diaspora-based model of human migration

Black and Hispanic Americans experience wider temperature swings

Gamers say they hate ‘smurfing,’ but admit they do it

How immune cells recognize the abnormal metabolism of cancer cells

How plants mate for life and repel other suitors

3D printing robot uses AI machine learning for US Army research

Ruptured Achilles tendon shows faster repair amid plasma irradiation treatment

Screen time not the main factor making parent-child interactions worse, study finds

Improving the effectiveness of earthquake early warning systems

[Press-News.org] Employee surveys may miss out on uncovering toxic leadership practices
Binghamton School of Management research explores how simplistic employee surveys may overlook negative leadership practices in an organization