PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

Samsung Austin Semiconductor invests $1M in UIUC to bolster semiconductor ecosystem in the US

2023-09-18
(Press-News.org) Urbana-Champaign, Illinois/Austin, Texas—[Sept. 18]—Samsung Austin Semiconductor is partnering with The Grainger College of Engineering at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) to continue building the talent pipeline needed to support the growing semiconductor ecosystem throughout the United States.

Samsung Austin Semiconductor is announcing a $1 million contribution per year to Grainger Engineering as part of its 5-star workforce development plan to provide support to engineering students who are interested in the semiconductor industry and increase opportunities for recruiting top engineering talent.

“Two things that set Grainger Engineering apart are our incredible student leaders who consistently rise to meet the growing needs of the world around them and the meaningful connections that pair their ideas with an industry partner like Samsung to change the world for the better,” said Grainger Engineering Dean Rashid Bashir. “This opportunity taps into a clear and present technological need for knowledgeable and innovative engineers who can influence the semiconductor space, for which there is nobody better than Grainger Engineers.”

The contribution will allow the school to focus on establishing a multi-year partnership for UIUC’s semiconductor minor program, which will launch in the fall of 2024.

The “Samsung Semiconductor Technology Program” will encompass the academic years from 2023 through 2027 and will provide 50 scholars with opportunities for scholarship, mentoring, academic support and participation in an innovative curriculum that advances the semiconductor ecosystem.

The first cohort of students from electrical and computer engineering, materials science, and physics were selected this spring with an expected graduation date of May 2025. Qualified students must have good academic standing and plan to pursue UIUC’s semiconductor minor.

“Advancing a STEM-ready workforce is a priority for the semiconductor ecosystem in the United States,” Samsung Austin Semiconductor president Bonyoung Koo said. “We look forward to investing in a top-ranked engineering school and establishing our new relationship with UIUC.”

“Samsung’s investment in semiconductor instruction at Illinois will enhance the already strong hands-on experiences in our program,” said Bruce Hajek, head of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Illinois. “The resources will attract more students to the semiconductor area and hone their abilities to deeply understand design and manufacturing and solve problems first. The new semiconductor minor will encourage students to take a more holistic view of semiconductors.”

With Samsung Austin Semiconductor’s investment in a new, state-of-the-art $17 billion semiconductor manufacturing facility in Taylor, Texas, the need for engineers will be in high demand for years to come. This announcement builds upon Samsung’s commitment to developing a STEM-ready talent pipeline in the United States. The Grainger College of Engineering is one of the top engineering programs in the world, enabling individuals to improve their quality of life through education, research, innovation,

entrepreneurship and societal engagement. Together, Grainger Engineering graduates, faculty and Samsung Austin Semiconductor can transform the world for the better and continue to propel this legacy of excellence forward for many years to come. To learn more about Samsung Austin Semiconductor, visit semiconductor.samsung.com/us/sas.

###

Media Contacts:

Aaron Seidlitz

Associate Director of Communications | The Grainger College of Engineering

University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

217.300.3662 aseid83@illinois.edu

 

Michele Glaze

Director of Communications and Community Affairs

Samsung Austin Semiconductor

512.672.3159 p.glaze@samsung.com

END


ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

UT Dallas to lead $30 million battery initiative

UT Dallas to lead $30 million battery initiative
2023-09-18
As announced by the Department of Defense today, The University of Texas at Dallas will receive $30 million over three years from the DOD to develop and commercialize new battery technologies and manufacturing processes, enhance the domestic availability of critical raw materials, and train high-quality workers for jobs in an expanding battery energy storage workforce. The award, which creates a prototype Energy Storage Systems Campus, is the largest allocation from a federal agency that the University has received to date. The Energy Storage Systems Campus will leverage and stimulate over $200 million in private capital. Dr. Kyeongjae ...

ACP issues updated Rapid, Living Practice Points on treating COVID-19 patients in outpatient settings

2023-09-18
Below please find a summary of a new article that will be published in the next issue of Annals of Internal Medicine. The summary is not intended to substitute for the full article as a source of information. This information is under strict embargo and by taking it into possession, media representatives are committing to the terms of the embargo not only on their own behalf, but also on behalf of the organization they represent. ---------------------------- ACP issues updated Rapid, Living Practice Points on treating COVID-19 patients in outpatient settings Article: https://www.acpjournals.org/doi/10.7326/M23-1636  Evidence ...

Promising gene-based approaches to repair lethal lung injury in the elderly from COVID-19, pneumonia, flu, sepsis

2023-09-18
Discovery from the lab of Youyang Zhao, PhD, from Stanley Manne Children’s Research Institute at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago offers promising treatment approaches for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in the elderly that can be caused by severe COVID-19, pneumonia, flu or sepsis. Currently there are no pharmacological or cell-based treatments for ARDS. Dr. Zhao’s research established that a gene called FOXM1 is important in the repair of blood vessel through regeneration of endothelial cells, which line the vessels of the lung. He found that aging impairs this gene’s expression, ...

Lifesaving addiction medications are rarely started following opioid overdose emergencies

2023-09-18
Could future opioid overdoses, fatalities and other harms of opioid addiction be prevented if hospital emergency departments made better use of effective medications for opioid addiction? A team of University of Michigan researchers thinks so.  Led by Thuy Nguyen of U-M's School of Public Health, the researchers analyzed national Medicaid claims data of patients ages 12 to 64 treated at U.S. emergency departments for opioid overdoses in 2018. They focused on ED visits for opioid overdose and the rate of initiation of FDA-approved medications for opioid addiction, including buprenorphine, methadone and extended release naltrexone.  The ...

Disparities in flu vaccine uptake persist in people with kidney disease

Disparities in flu vaccine uptake persist in people with kidney disease
2023-09-18
Among adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD) enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC), young age, Black race, and low levels of education and income were associated with lower likelihood of getting an annual flu shot. Identifying risk factors for not receiving a flu vaccine (“non-vaccination”) in people living with kidney disease, who are at risk of flu and its complications, could inform strategies for improving vaccine uptake. In this study published in the American Journal of Kidney Diseases (AJKD), researchers led by Junichi Ishigami examined whether demographic factors, social ...

A suit of armor for cancer-fighting cells

2023-09-18
In recent years, cancer researchers have hailed the arrival of chimeric antigen receptor T cell (CAR T) therapy, which has delivered promising results, transforming the fight against various forms of cancer. The process involves modifying patients’ T-cells to target cancer cells, resulting in remarkable success rates for previously intractable forms of cancer. Six CAR T cell therapies have secured FDA approval, and several more are in the pipeline. However, these therapies come with severe and potentially lethal side effects, namely cytokine release syndrome (CRS) and neurotoxicity. These drawbacks manifest as a range of symptoms—from high fever and vomiting to multiple ...

Dana-Farber leads adaptive, efficient multi-arm phase 2 clinical trial for glioblastoma

2023-09-18
EMBARGOED: September 18, 2023 4PM EST CONTACT:  Nicole Oliverio, nicole_oliverio@dfci.harvard.edu, 617-257-0454 Boston – An innovative phase 2 clinical trial led by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in collaboration with 10 major brain tumor centers around the country and designed to find new potential treatments for glioblastoma has reported initial results in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. While none of the three therapeutics tested so far improved overall survival of patients, this adaptive platform trial, the first of its kind in neuro-oncology, has the potential to rapidly and efficiently identify therapies that ...

New research highlights importance of equity in education

New research highlights importance of equity in education
2023-09-18
A new study looks at the impact of learning environments on the academic success of racialized students. Compared to their peers, these students feel they have less control in their academic environment, less confidence and self-efficacy in their academic abilities, and weaker connections to other students and professors. The University of Ottawa study underscores that higher education institutions must recognize and address the specific needs of their racialized student communities and create inclusive learning environments that better meet these needs. Failing to do so could affect the overall psychological well-being and academic performance ...

Cell therapy can reduce risk of death from COVID-19 by 60%, study shows

2023-09-18
The use of cell therapy to treat COVID-19 patients can reduce the risk of death from the disease by 60%, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis conducted by researchers at the University of São Paulo (USP) in Brazil, in partnership with colleagues in Germany and the United States. Their findings are reported in an article published in the journal Frontiers in Immunology. The review covers 195 clinical trials of advanced cell therapies targeting COVID-19 that were conducted in 30 countries between January 2020 and December 2021, as well as 26 trials with outcomes published by July 2022. Cell therapy has come into increasingly frequent use in recent years ...

The pace of climate-driven extinction is accelerating, a UArizona-led study shows

The pace of climate-driven extinction is accelerating, a UArizona-led study shows
2023-09-18
Climate change is causing extinctions at an increasing rate, a new study by the University of Arizona researchers shows. They surveyed populations of the Yarrow's spiny lizard in 18 mountain ranges in southeastern Arizona and analyzed the rate of climate-related extinction over time. "The magnitude of extinction we found over the past seven years was similar to that seen in other studies that spanned almost 70 years," said John J. Wiens, a professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at UArizona, ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

Quantum computing will radically alter the application of copyright law, study says

Ochsner Health & Wellness Day in New Orleans East set for March 9

Protecting joints from bacteria with mussels

Researchers investigate immune response of a man who received 217 Covid vaccinations

Proceed with caution – the meteoric rise of zero-alcohol drinks

USC collaborates with startup supporter Techstars to encourage intellectual property development

Who military service members see as credible to discuss secure firearm storage for suicide prevention

Low birthweight coupled with overweight in 20s linked with ‘massive risk’ of early type 2 diabetes in men

DNA aptamer drug sensors can instantly detect cocaine, heroin and fentanyl – even when combined with other drugs

New project will use next-gen at-home rapid test to track COVID-19, RSV, and flu

SRI relaunches the PARC Forum event series as it celebrates the first anniversary of acquiring the storied Palo Alto Research Center

An inside look at Beech tree disease

New AI model draws treasure maps to diagnose disease

Breastfeeding after COVID-19 booster can give babies antibodies

Researchers closing in on genetic treatments for hereditary lung disease, vision loss

COVID-19 associated with increased risk for autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases up to a year after infection

UC Irvine receives $15 million NSF grant for integrative movement research

University of Houston engineer Metin Akay featured in study highlighting 50 scientists' contributions to biomedical engineering advancements

JWST captures the end of planet formation

Good news—MS drugs taken while breastfeeding may not affect child development

Programs intended to reduce health insurance premiums may make coverage less affordable for the middle class

PrEP discontinuation in a US national cohort of sexual and gender minority populations, 2017–22

USC Study: Medicare Part D plans increased restrictions on drug coverage

Sacituzumab govitecan plus platinum-based chemotherapy in breast, bladder, and lung carcinomas

Global study unveils "problematic" use of porn

Newly discovered protein prevents DNA triplication

Less ice in the arctic ocean has complex effects on marine ecosystems and ocean productivity

Antarctica’s coasts are becoming less icy

New research shows migrating animals learn by experience

Modeling the origins of life: New evidence for an “RNA World”

[Press-News.org] Samsung Austin Semiconductor invests $1M in UIUC to bolster semiconductor ecosystem in the US