PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

Yogurt may be the next go-to garlic breath remedy

Study finds proteins in particular have strong deodorizing effect

2023-09-19
(Press-News.org) COLUMBUS, Ohio – It turns out yogurt may have a previously unknown benefit: eliminating garlic odors.

A new study conducted in a lab – with follow-up human breath tests being planned – showed that whole milk plain yogurt prevented almost all of the volatile compounds responsible for garlic’s pungent scent from escaping into the air.

Researchers tested the garlic deodorizing capacity of yogurt and its individual components of water, fat and protein to see how each stood up to the stink. Both fat and protein were effective at trapping garlic odors, leading the scientists to suggest high-protein foods may one day be formulated specifically to fight garlic breath.

“High protein is a very hot thing right now – generally, people want to eat more protein,” said senior study author Sheryl Barringer, professor of food science and technology at The Ohio State University.

“An unintended side benefit may be a high-protein formulation that could be advertised as a breath deodorizer in addition to its nutritional claims,” she said. “I was more excited about the protein’s effectiveness because consumer advice to eat a high-fat food is not going to go over well.”

The study was published recently in the journal Molecules.

Barringer has a history of identifying foods that can combat garlic breath, among them apples, mint and lettuce and milk, thanks to their enzymes and fat, respectively, that snuff out the sulfur-based compounds that cause garlic’s persistent smell.

After encountering speculation that yogurt might have a deodorizing effect, Barringer and first author Manpreet Kaur, a PhD student in her lab, decided to check it out.

For each treatment experiment, the researchers placed equal amounts of raw garlic in glass bottles and confirmed the cluster of offending sulfur-based volatiles were released in concentrations that would be detected by the human nose. They used mass spectrometry to measure levels of the volatile molecules in gaseous form present before and after each treatment.

Results showed that yogurt alone reduced 99% of the major odor-producing raw garlic volatiles. When introduced separately, the fat, water and protein components of yogurt also had a deodorizing effect on raw garlic, but fat and protein performed better than water.

In the case of fat, a higher quantity of butter fat was more effective at deodorization. The proteins studied included different forms of whey, casein and milk proteins, all of which were effective at deodorizing garlic – likely because of their ability to trap the volatile molecules before they were emitted into the air. A casein micelle-whey protein complex performed the best.

“We know proteins bind flavor – a lot of times that’s considered a negative, especially if a food with high protein has less flavor. In this case, it could be a positive,” Barringer said.

Additional experiments involving changing the pH of the yogurt to make it less acidic – from 4.4 pH to 7 pH – reduced the yogurt’s deodorization effect on the garlic. Changing the pH of water, on the other hand, did not make any difference in water’s deodorization effect.

“That’s telling me it goes back to those proteins, because as you change pH you change the configuration of proteins and their ability to bind. That said we definitely should be looking at these proteins,” Barringer said. “It probably depends on the protein, as well, because different proteins react differently to pH. So that may be an important thing as we look at other proteins for their garlic deodorization effect.”

Barringer and Kaur tested the deodorizing effect of yogurt and its separate components on fried garlic as well, and in the process, they discovered that frying garlic alone significantly reduces most of garlic’s odor-causing volatile compounds. Yogurt and its individual ingredients neutralized a lower percentage of volatile compounds of fried garlic compared to raw garlic, presumably because there were fewer volatiles to trap than were present in the raw cloves, the researchers theorized.

The findings are a good foundation for future studies analyzing a variety of proteins that might be formulated into the perfect garlic-breath-reducing product and seeking to verify yogurt’s ability to curb actual garlic breath in people.

In the meantime, Barringer predicts that Greek yogurt, with a higher-protein profile than the whole milk plain yogurt used in the study, may be particularly effective at getting rid of garlic breath. Fruit-flavored yogurts will probably work, too, she said – and whatever is used, it must quickly follow ingestion of raw garlic.

“With apples, we have always said to eat them immediately,” she said. “The same with yogurt is presumed to be the case – have your garlic and eat the yogurt right away.”

#

Contact: Sheryl Barringer, Barringer.11@osu.edu

Written by Emily Caldwell, Caldwell.151@osu.edu; 614-292-8152

END



ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

Laser-based ice-core sampling for studying climate change

Laser-based ice-core sampling for studying climate change
2023-09-19
Researchers led by Yuko Motizuki from the Astro-Glaciology Laboratory at the RIKEN Nishina Center in Japan have developed a new laser-based sampling system for studying the composition of ice cores taken from glaciers. The new system has a 3-mm depth-resolution—about 3 times smaller than what is currently available—meaning that it can detect temperature variations that occurred over much smaller periods of time in the past. The new laser melting sampler, or LMS, is expected to help reconstruct continuous annual temperature changes that occurred thousands to hundreds of thousands of years ago, which will ...

Gene required for root hair growth, nitrate foraging found in grasses

Gene required for root hair growth, nitrate foraging found in grasses
2023-09-19
PULLMAN, Wash. -- Scientists have found a plant gene that drives the growth of root hairs, the tiny structures that help plants find water and nutrients in the soil. Identified by a team led by Washington State University researcher Karen Sanguinet, the gene, dubbed “BUZZ,” causes faster-growing, denser webs of roots and may also determine how plants find and use nitrates, a prime source of nitrogen essential to plant growth. Nitrates are also used in fertilizers that can pollute the environment as runoff, and this genetic discovery could ultimately help plant scientists find ways to grow crops more sustainably. “Nitrate ...

Job strain combined with high efforts and low reward doubled men’s heart disease risk

2023-09-19
Research Highlights: Men exposed to stressful working conditions who also felt that they put forth high effort but received low reward had twice the risk of heart disease compared to men who were free of those psychosocial stressors. The impact of job strain and effort-reward imbalance combined was similar to the magnitude of the impact of obesity on the risk of coronary heart disease, in the study of nearly 6,500 white-collar workers in Canada.  Results on how work stress affects women’s heart health were inconclusive. Embargoed ...

Breaking in the black box of pedagogical authority

Breaking in the black box of pedagogical authority
2023-09-19
How does pedagogical authority operate in the classroom? A team from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and the University of Teacher Education, State of Vaud (HEP Vaud) has produced one of the first in-depth field studies on this subject. By filming teachers in training over a period of several months, the researchers identified different ways of exercising teaching authority and assessed their effectiveness. They found that strategies based on double addressing - i.e. addressing several students or groups of students simultaneously, using two different communication channels - were particularly effective. These results ...

Witchcraft accusations an ‘occupational hazard’ for female workers in early modern England

Witchcraft accusations an ‘occupational hazard’ for female workers in early modern England
2023-09-19
While both men and women have historically been accused of the malicious use of magic, only around 10–30% of suspected witches were men by the 16th and 17th centuries.*   This bias towards women is often attributed to misogyny as well as economic hard times. Now, a Cambridge historian has added another contributing factor to the mix.   Dr Philippa Carter argues that the types of employment open to women at the time came with a much higher risk of facing allegations of witchcraft, or maleficium. In a study published in the journal Gender & History, Carter uses the casebooks of Richard ...

China global Merged Surface Temperature dataset (CMST) reveals 2023 on Track to Be Hottest Year Ever

China global Merged Surface Temperature dataset (CMST) reveals 2023 on Track to Be Hottest Year Ever
2023-09-19
The climate crisis is reaching unprecedented levels of urgency as global temperatures soar to record-breaking heights, with July 2023 marking another alarming milestone. United Nations Secretary-General  António Guterres  declared it a "disaster for the whole planet," emphasizing that the era of "global warming" has given way to an era of "global boiling." This alarming assessment is supported by recent findings from Professor Qingxiang Li 's team at the School of Atmospheric ...

Moderate to vigorous physical activity early in the day influences weight management, health outcomes

2023-09-19
ROCKVILLE, Md.—Even though epidemiological evidence has been controversial regarding the optimal timing of physical activity for weight management, the hours of 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. appear to be the most favorable time of day to enhance the association between daily moderate to vigorous physical activity and obesity, according to a new analysis published in Obesity, The Obesity Society’s (TOS) flagship journal. “Our study provided a novel tool to explore the diurnal pattern of physical activity and to investigate its impact on health outcomes,” said Tongyu Ma, PhD, assistant professor, Health Sciences Department, Franklin Pierce University, Rindge, ...

Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI) and Research Institutes of Sweden AB (RISE) Ink MoU to Advance Cooperation in Science and Technology

Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI) and Research Institutes of Sweden AB (RISE) Ink MoU to Advance Cooperation in Science and Technology
2023-09-19
Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI) and Research Institutes of Sweden AB (RISE) have officially entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) aimed at enhancing collaborative research in the field of national strategic technologies. The signing ceremony took place at RISE in Stockholm, Sweden on Friday, September 15, 2023.   RISE, recognized as Europe’s largest state-owned research institute, is composed of 30 private and government-funded research institutes, along with more than 130 government-designated testing agencies. It also boasts a workforce ...

Study finds the placenta holds answers to many unexplained pregnancy losses

Study finds the placenta holds answers to many unexplained pregnancy losses
2023-09-19
New Haven, Conn. — Yale researchers have shown that placental examination resulted in the accurate pathologic determination of more than 90% of previously unexplained pregnancy losses, a discovery that they say may inform pregnancy care going forward. The findings were reported Sept. 19 in the journal Reproductive Sciences. There are approximately 5 million pregnancies per year in the United States, with 1 million ending in miscarriage (a loss occurring prior to 20 weeks of gestation) and over 20,000 ending in stillbirth at or beyond 20 ...

Keeping Vilsmeier reagent in the flow: From toxin to medicine in one go

Keeping Vilsmeier reagent in the flow: From toxin to medicine in one go
2023-09-19
The Vilsmeier reagent is necessary for producing a large range of pharmaceuticals, but its unstable nature and toxic precursor phosgene are challenges for its use. A new process that efficiently produces phosgene, the Vilsmeier reagent and the desired products in one flow is poised to make the industry greener and safer. For the production of many active pharmaceutical ingredients, a chemical called Vilsmeier reagent is necessary, but it is extremely unstable. That's why it is produced on-site and on-demand wherever possible. In addition, the currently used methods for producing the ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

Researchers discover disease-causing stem cells in lungs of cystic fibrosis patients

Combating distrust online: New GW study explains why current messaging efforts may not be effective

When needs compete, love trumps thirst

NIH awards merit grant for nanofiber research targeting metastatic lung tumors

UTA research: Wildlife loss five times slower in protected areas

Milestone for novel atomic clock

NSF backs Rice processor design, chip security research

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital unveils the Domino’s Village

U of M Medical School professor receives $3.5 million to develop Tanzanian reproductive health curriculum for those with disabilities

How liver cells become scarring, and worse

Does form follow function? Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers advance understanding of why cell parts look the way they do

New study finds children of color and from low-income families are exposed to more toxic chemicals and experience greater harm

Community mobility and depressive symptoms during the pandemic

Cannabis use frequency and cannabis-related consequences in high-risk young adults across cannabis legalization

Decriminalizing drug possession not linked to higher overdose death rates in Oregon or Washington

Impact of genes linked to neurodevelopmental diseases found in Stanford Medicine-led study

Powering the quantum revolution: Quantum engines on the horizon

New proof for black hole spin

Monitoring of radio galaxy M87 confirms black hole spin

Desalination system could produce freshwater that is cheaper than tap water

Protecting lands slows biodiversity loss among vertebrates by five times

How an audience changes a songbird’s brain

Organic lasers have a bright future

Women’s mood worsens during ‘pill pause’ period of monthly contraceptive pill cycle

Teams investigate material degradation process of carbon-based catalyst

Team examines importance of zeolite in catalysts for syngas conversion

AI chest X-ray model analysis reveals race and sex bias

Integration propels machine vision

Blocking abnormal stem cell signal during aging lessens related bone loss

Henry Ford Health first in Michigan to introduce advanced prostate diagnostic technology

[Press-News.org] Yogurt may be the next go-to garlic breath remedy
Study finds proteins in particular have strong deodorizing effect