PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

Technological progress and climate change

Technological progress and climate change
2023-09-19
(Press-News.org) Technological progress can reduce the energy required to achieve the same ends, reducing the use of fossil fuels and the greenhouse gases associated with burning fossil fuels. But technological progress can also make production, consumption, and travel cheaper, stimulating demand and consequently increasing greenhouse gas emissions. Sai Liang and colleagues sought to explore this conundrum by building an environmentally extended general equilibrium model with heterogeneous agent and input-output network covering 141 nations and 65 sectors, as defined by the Global Trade Analysis Project. The authors found that whether technological progress tended to decrease or increase emissions depended on its place in the value chain. Progress in upstream sectors tends to result in increased emissions overall, while progress in downstream sectors tends to lower global emissions. Technological progress in Russia’s chemicals sector; China’s gas sector; and China’s, the United States’, and South Korea’s coal and petroleum sectors have significantly increased global emissions, whereas technological progress in China’s sugar and construction sectors and the United States’ dwelling and human health and social work sectors have significantly reduced global emissions. (The dwelling sector includes such activities as housing investment, residential construction, and residential real estate services; the human health and social work sector includes economic activities related to healthcare and social welfare services, such as medical laboratories, pharmacies, and services related to social assistance.) According to the authors, the model could help national governments identify where technological progress can best help meet emissions reductions goals—and where policies might be needed to prevent the tendency for energy use to rebound after a technological advance increases consumption. 

END

[Attachments] See images for this press release:
Technological progress and climate change

ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

Yogurt may be the next go-to garlic breath remedy

2023-09-19
COLUMBUS, Ohio – It turns out yogurt may have a previously unknown benefit: eliminating garlic odors. A new study conducted in a lab – with follow-up human breath tests being planned – showed that whole milk plain yogurt prevented almost all of the volatile compounds responsible for garlic’s pungent scent from escaping into the air. Researchers tested the garlic deodorizing capacity of yogurt and its individual components of water, fat and protein to see how each stood up to the stink. Both fat and protein were effective at trapping garlic odors, leading the scientists to suggest high-protein ...

Laser-based ice-core sampling for studying climate change

Laser-based ice-core sampling for studying climate change
2023-09-19
Researchers led by Yuko Motizuki from the Astro-Glaciology Laboratory at the RIKEN Nishina Center in Japan have developed a new laser-based sampling system for studying the composition of ice cores taken from glaciers. The new system has a 3-mm depth-resolution—about 3 times smaller than what is currently available—meaning that it can detect temperature variations that occurred over much smaller periods of time in the past. The new laser melting sampler, or LMS, is expected to help reconstruct continuous annual temperature changes that occurred thousands to hundreds of thousands of years ago, which will ...

Gene required for root hair growth, nitrate foraging found in grasses

Gene required for root hair growth, nitrate foraging found in grasses
2023-09-19
PULLMAN, Wash. -- Scientists have found a plant gene that drives the growth of root hairs, the tiny structures that help plants find water and nutrients in the soil. Identified by a team led by Washington State University researcher Karen Sanguinet, the gene, dubbed “BUZZ,” causes faster-growing, denser webs of roots and may also determine how plants find and use nitrates, a prime source of nitrogen essential to plant growth. Nitrates are also used in fertilizers that can pollute the environment as runoff, and this genetic discovery could ultimately help plant scientists find ways to grow crops more sustainably. “Nitrate ...

Job strain combined with high efforts and low reward doubled men’s heart disease risk

2023-09-19
Research Highlights: Men exposed to stressful working conditions who also felt that they put forth high effort but received low reward had twice the risk of heart disease compared to men who were free of those psychosocial stressors. The impact of job strain and effort-reward imbalance combined was similar to the magnitude of the impact of obesity on the risk of coronary heart disease, in the study of nearly 6,500 white-collar workers in Canada.  Results on how work stress affects women’s heart health were inconclusive. Embargoed ...

Breaking in the black box of pedagogical authority

Breaking in the black box of pedagogical authority
2023-09-19
How does pedagogical authority operate in the classroom? A team from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and the University of Teacher Education, State of Vaud (HEP Vaud) has produced one of the first in-depth field studies on this subject. By filming teachers in training over a period of several months, the researchers identified different ways of exercising teaching authority and assessed their effectiveness. They found that strategies based on double addressing - i.e. addressing several students or groups of students simultaneously, using two different communication channels - were particularly effective. These results ...

Witchcraft accusations an ‘occupational hazard’ for female workers in early modern England

Witchcraft accusations an ‘occupational hazard’ for female workers in early modern England
2023-09-19
While both men and women have historically been accused of the malicious use of magic, only around 10–30% of suspected witches were men by the 16th and 17th centuries.*   This bias towards women is often attributed to misogyny as well as economic hard times. Now, a Cambridge historian has added another contributing factor to the mix.   Dr Philippa Carter argues that the types of employment open to women at the time came with a much higher risk of facing allegations of witchcraft, or maleficium. In a study published in the journal Gender & History, Carter uses the casebooks of Richard ...

China global Merged Surface Temperature dataset (CMST) reveals 2023 on Track to Be Hottest Year Ever

China global Merged Surface Temperature dataset (CMST) reveals 2023 on Track to Be Hottest Year Ever
2023-09-19
The climate crisis is reaching unprecedented levels of urgency as global temperatures soar to record-breaking heights, with July 2023 marking another alarming milestone. United Nations Secretary-General  António Guterres  declared it a "disaster for the whole planet," emphasizing that the era of "global warming" has given way to an era of "global boiling." This alarming assessment is supported by recent findings from Professor Qingxiang Li 's team at the School of Atmospheric ...

Moderate to vigorous physical activity early in the day influences weight management, health outcomes

2023-09-19
ROCKVILLE, Md.—Even though epidemiological evidence has been controversial regarding the optimal timing of physical activity for weight management, the hours of 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. appear to be the most favorable time of day to enhance the association between daily moderate to vigorous physical activity and obesity, according to a new analysis published in Obesity, The Obesity Society’s (TOS) flagship journal. “Our study provided a novel tool to explore the diurnal pattern of physical activity and to investigate its impact on health outcomes,” said Tongyu Ma, PhD, assistant professor, Health Sciences Department, Franklin Pierce University, Rindge, ...

Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI) and Research Institutes of Sweden AB (RISE) Ink MoU to Advance Cooperation in Science and Technology

Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI) and Research Institutes of Sweden AB (RISE) Ink MoU to Advance Cooperation in Science and Technology
2023-09-19
Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI) and Research Institutes of Sweden AB (RISE) have officially entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) aimed at enhancing collaborative research in the field of national strategic technologies. The signing ceremony took place at RISE in Stockholm, Sweden on Friday, September 15, 2023.   RISE, recognized as Europe’s largest state-owned research institute, is composed of 30 private and government-funded research institutes, along with more than 130 government-designated testing agencies. It also boasts a workforce ...

Study finds the placenta holds answers to many unexplained pregnancy losses

Study finds the placenta holds answers to many unexplained pregnancy losses
2023-09-19
New Haven, Conn. — Yale researchers have shown that placental examination resulted in the accurate pathologic determination of more than 90% of previously unexplained pregnancy losses, a discovery that they say may inform pregnancy care going forward. The findings were reported Sept. 19 in the journal Reproductive Sciences. There are approximately 5 million pregnancies per year in the United States, with 1 million ending in miscarriage (a loss occurring prior to 20 weeks of gestation) and over 20,000 ending in stillbirth at or beyond 20 ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

12.5, the 1st Impact Factor of COMMTR released!

Circadian clock impact on cluster headaches funded by $2.4M NIH grant for UTHealth Houston research

Study identifies first drug therapy for sleep apnea

How old is your bone marrow?

Boosting biodiversity without hurting local economies

ChatGPT is biased against resumes with credentials that imply a disability — but it can improve

Simple test for flu could improve diagnosis and surveillance

UT Health San Antonio researcher awarded five-year, $2.53 million NIH grant to study alcohol-assisted liver disease

Giving pre-med students hands-on clinical training

CAMH research suggests potential targets for prevention and early identification of psychotic disorders

Mapping the heart to prevent damage caused by a heart attack

Study challenges popular idea that Easter islanders committed ‘ecocide’

Chilling discovery: Study reveals evolution of human cold and menthol sensing protein, offering hope for future non-addictive pain therapies.

Elena Beccalli, new rector of Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, takes office on 1st July

Pacific Northwest Research Institute uncovers hidden DNA mechanisms of rare genetic diseases

Empowering older adults: Wearable tech made easier with personalized support

Pennington Biomedical researchers partner on award-winning Long Covid study

Cooling ‘blood oranges’ could make them even healthier – a bonus for consumers

Body image and overall health found important to the sexual health of older gay men, according to new studies

Lab-grown muscles reveal mysteries of rare muscle diseases

Primary hepatic angiosarcoma: Treatment options for a rare tumor

Research finds causal evidence tying cerebral small-vessel disease to Alzheimer’s, dementia

Navigating the Pyrocene: Recent Cell Press papers on managing fire risk

Restoring the Great Salt Lake would have environmental justice as well as ecological benefits

Cannabis, tobacco use, and COVID-19 outcomes

A 5:2 intermittent fasting meal replacement diet and glycemic control for adults with diabetes

Scientists document self-propelling oxygen decline in the oceans

Activating molecular target reverses multiple hallmarks of aging

Cannabis use tied to increased risk of severe COVID-19

How to make ageing a ‘fairer game’ for all wormkind

[Press-News.org] Technological progress and climate change