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Didriks Announces Third Annual February Campaign to Benefit Food For Free

Didriks, a retailer of outdoor furniture and home furnishings announced that they will donate five percent of February sales to Cambridge, MA nonprofit Food For Free.

Didriks Announces Third Annual February Campaign to Benefit Food For Free
2011-01-08
CAMBRIDGE, MA, January 08, 2011 (Press-News.org) Didriks, a retailer of outdoor furniture and home furnishings, announced that they will donate five percent of in-store and online sales in February to Cambridge, MA nonprofit Food For Free.  This will be Didriks' third annual campaign to benefit Food For Free, an organization that collects and provides fresh food to the needy.

Didriks invites the public to an in-store kickoff party on February 3rd, 2011, from 5-8pm. Catering for the event is provided by Season to Taste catering.

Food For Free Director, David Leslie, said: "We're excited and grateful to partner with Didriks once again for this promotion and appreciate their continued support. This campaign brings more awareness of what we do, addressing the issues of local hunger with healthy and nutritious food." 

Jonathan Henke, owner of Didriks, said: "Didriks has proudly supported Food For Free for six years, and we feel that it's important to continue to make this extra effort to benefit the least fortunate." 

About Food For Free 
Food For Free rescues fresh food - food that might otherwise go to waste-and distributes it within the local emergency food system where it can reach those in need.

Visit the Food For Free website at www.foodforfree.org.

About Didriks
Didriks helps customers create inspired home environments with their collection of home furnishings, accents and outdoor furniture. Didriks provides attentive, personalized service, including free shipping. Didriks carries the highest quality teak and stainless steel outdoor furniture, designed and manufactured by Barlow Tyrie. Didriks also carries Belgian linens from Libeco Home, vinyl floor mats by Chilewich, dinnerware, fine pottery and cookware from Simon Pearce, iittala, Heath Ceramics, Match Pewter, Mauviel and other fine brands. Didriks has been featured nationally in home furnishings publications such as Elle Decor, Martha Stewart Magazine, Bon Appetit, and Good Housekeeping.

For more information, call 617-354-5700, see the outdoor furniture and home furnishings showroom at 190 Concord Ave in Cambridge, MA (M-F 10-7, Sat 10-6, Sun 11-5) or visit the websites at www.didriks.com and www.belgian-linen.com.

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[Press-News.org] Didriks Announces Third Annual February Campaign to Benefit Food For Free
Didriks, a retailer of outdoor furniture and home furnishings announced that they will donate five percent of February sales to Cambridge, MA nonprofit Food For Free.