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New research questions the nature and meaning of "psychic-channeling" experiences

2023-11-16
(Press-News.org) The question of disembodied consciousness or the afterlife has received much scientific scrutiny over the last several years. One line of research involves so-called "channelers" or mediums who claim to receive and communicate information that they believe comes from some other being or dimension of reality that differs from everyday reality. Now, an international team of scientists has critically examined these claims. New research published in the Journal of Scientific Exploration asked 15 pre-vetted channelers to access the same "nonphysical being or spirit" source and answer a structured set of 10 questions from the scientific team. The statistical results revealed virtually no correspondence for each question across the channelers and scant support that the channelers perceived they were accessing the same source of information. However, qualitative analysis found coherent and common themes in the channeled responses for many questions. That is, the answers were very different at a superficial level, but when looking at the content themes, there were many similarities. These somewhat mixed results raise important questions about the nature and meaning of channeling experiences and how to study them. “Unveiling the dynamic world of channeling, this international study reveals its idiosyncrasies and research challenges, offering valuable nuggets of wisdom for future researchers looking to tap into its potential usefulness," said Dr. Helané Wahbeh, who headed the research. Several limitations prevent definitive conclusions from the study, but it showed that claims of channeling and mediumship can be studied scientifically and under controlled conditions. The authors concluded that channeling is likely a complex phenomenon that deserves more serious study as such perceptions are probably influenced by many, as yet unknown factors that should reveal much about the limits of brain functioning and human consciousness.


About the Journal of Scientific Exploration:
A publication of the Society for Scientific Exploration, JSE is an open-access, platinum peer-
reviewed journal that is devoted to maverick or frontier science topics. It is freely available
online at www.journalofscientificexploration.org.


Media Contacts:
Cindy Little, JSE Media Specialist
jsemedia@scientificexploration.org


Helané Wahbeh, N.D., M.C.R Lead author of study
Institute of Noetic Sciences
hwahbeh@noetic.org


Research article:
Wahbeh, H., Speirn, P., Pederzoli, L., & Tressoldi, P. (2023). Channelers' answers to questions
from scientists: An exploratory study. Journal of Scientific Exploration, 37(3), 348-369.
https://doi.org/10.31275/20232907


Please name the Journal in any story you write. If you are writing for the web, please link to the
article. All articles are available free of charge, according to JSE's open access policy.

END


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[Press-News.org] New research questions the nature and meaning of "psychic-channeling" experiences