PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

U of M Medical School study finds visions of nonphysical world are common among cognitively healthy Ojibwe individuals

2023-12-04
(Press-News.org) MINNEAPOLIS/ST. PAUL (12/04/2023) — Visual hallucinations are common among people with Lewy body dementia and other types of dementia. Identifying visual hallucinations is an important component of a wide variety of medical and psychiatric diagnoses and treatments, but without cultural context, some patients’ symptoms can be misinterpreted or misdiagnosed.

In existing medical literature, there is almost no information regarding normal spiritual experiences in American Indian participants in the context of a neurocognitive evaluation. University of Minnesota Medical School researchers sought to understand how Ojibwe culture and spirituality affect a doctor’s assessment of normal aging.

Published in JAMA Network Open, the research team found that visions of the nonphysical world are common among cognitively healthy Ojibwe individuals and can represent normal spiritual experiences. 

“Consideration of a patient’s cultural background and belief system can help avert erroneous disqualification for disease-modifying therapy, exclusion from clinical trials and all the negative ramifications associated with a misdiagnosis of psychiatric disease," said William Mantyh, MD, an assistant professor at the University of Minnesota Medical School and  behavioral neurologist with M Health Fairview.

In partnership with an Ojibwe Tribal Nation in Minnesota, the study recruited 33 cognitively healthy tribal elders aged 55 years or older. The research found 48% of participants reported frequent transient visions of the nonphysical world that generally were benevolent and involved spiritual beings and/or ancestors. 

According to the research team, clinicians would benefit from careful consideration of cultural or spiritual context to avoid misdiagnosis of neuropsychiatric disease. 

“Today’s environment of infrequent or insufficiently short cognitive evaluations—an average 16-minute face-to-face visit with a physician—and increasing use of pre-visit symptom checklists increase the risk of falsely attributing a spiritual experience to a hallucination,” said Dr. Mantyh. 

Dr. Mantyh and his research team's overarching goal is to ensure accurate diagnosis of neurodegenerative disease in American Indian communities. To reach this goal, the research team is including American Indian participants in the development of a new Alzheimer's disease blood test. So far, more than 250 participants have been included. These new Alzheimer's disease blood tests—which are up to 95% accurate—directly detect the proteins related to Alzheimer's disease in the blood, but they also look at a patient's APOE ε4 gene. APOE ε4 is the most significant genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, but its effect on Alzheimer's disease depends on a patient's ancestry. 

This research was funded by the National Institutes of Health [grant R01AG080806], Wallin Foundation, Fesler-Lampert Chair of Aging, American Academy of Neurology, Alzheimer's Association and the American Brain Foundation.

###

This project was made possible by a resolution of support for the research from both the Minnesota Chippewa tribe and Bois Forte Band of Chippewa tribal council. The partnership with the Bois Forte Band of Chippewa Tribe has played a crucial role in ensuring all Tribal Protocols of the project research are met and would not be possible without their constant leadership and partnership.

The research team would like to recognize Annamarie Hill, MA, and Neil Henderson, PhD, for their help in establishing this research and building the key relationships necessary to conduct this work.

About the University of Minnesota Medical School
The University of Minnesota Medical School is at the forefront of learning and discovery, transforming medical care and educating the next generation of physicians. Our graduates and faculty produce high-impact biomedical research and advance the practice of medicine. We acknowledge that the U of M Medical School, both the Twin Cities campus and Duluth campus, is located on traditional, ancestral and contemporary lands of the Dakota and the Ojibwe, and scores of other Indigenous people, and we affirm our commitment to tribal communities and their sovereignty as we seek to improve and strengthen our relations with tribal nations. For more information about the U of M Medical School, please visit med.umn.edu. 

END


ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

Consistency key to corporate expressions of racial solidarity

2023-12-04
ITHACA, N.Y. – Why do some corporate expressions of solidarity with marginalized groups register as genuine, while others seem performative or even backfire? An analysis of statements by Fortune 500 companies following the 2020 police killing of George Floyd finds that costly actions, such as donating money to social justice groups, aren’t enough to convey allyship to Black Americans. Companies must also demonstrate a consistent, long-term commitment to diversity and racial equity, according to research co-authored by James T. Carter,  assistant ...

How mountains affect El Niño-induced winter precipitation

2023-12-04
COLUMBUS, Ohio – A consideration of how mountains influence El Niño and La Niña-induced precipitation change in western North America may be the ticket to more informed water conservation planning along the Colorado River, new research suggests. The study, coinciding with a recent shift from a strong La Niña to a strong El Niño, brings a degree of precision to efforts to make more accurate winter precipitation predictions in the intermountain West by comparing 150 years of rain and snow data with historic El Niño-Southern Oscillation patterns. Overall, the analysis shows ...

ECHO research examines nutrition data's value from pregnancy to adolescence in understanding child health

2023-12-04
Collaborative ECHO research led by Megan Bragg, PhD, RD and Kristen Lyall, ScD of the A.J. Drexel Autism Institute highlights the opportunity for researchers to access the large amount of diet information already collected from the ECHO Cohort. This research, titled “Opportunities for examining child health impacts of early-life nutrition in the ECHO Program: Maternal and child dietary intake data from pregnancy to adolescence”, is published in Current Developments in Nutrition. This study aimed to describe dietary intake data available in the ...

Training the immune system to prevent cancer – NextGen researchers discover paradigm-shifting approach

Training the immune system to prevent cancer – NextGen researchers discover paradigm-shifting approach
2023-12-04
As one of the most insidious diseases in the world, cancer has few treatments that work to eradicate it completely. Now, a new ground-breaking approach pioneered by two researchers working at the University of Missouri’s Roy Blunt NextGen Precision Health building shows promising results in preventing lung cancer caused by a carcinogen in cigarettes — a discovery that immunologists Haval Shirwan and Esma Yolcu rank among the most significant of their careers. In the new study, Shirwan and Yolcu designed a molecule — known as an immune checkpoint stimulator (SA-4-1BBL) ...

Snail-inspired robot could scoop ocean microplastics

2023-12-04
ITHACA, N.Y. – Inspired by a small and slow snail, scientists have developed a robot protype that may one day scoop up microplastics from the surfaces of oceans, seas and lakes. The robot’s design is based on the Hawaiian apple snail (Pomacea canaliculate), a common aquarium snail that uses the undulating motion of its foot to drive water surface flow and suck in floating food particles. Currently, plastic collection devices mostly rely on drag nets or conveyor belts to gather and remove larger plastic debris from water, but they lack the fine scale required for retrieving microplastics. These tiny particles of plastic can be ingested ...

Georgia State professor granted $5 million to identify and characterize objects in space

Georgia State professor granted $5 million to identify and characterize objects in space
2023-12-04
ATLANTA — Georgia State Professor of Physics & Astronomy Stuart Jefferies has been awarded a $5 million, multi-institutional grant by the U.S. Air Force to develop techniques to detect, map and image faint objects in space. The work could have far-reaching impacts, including strengthening national security in an increasingly congested space domain. The work will also advance the next generation of exceptionally large telescopes and improve the capabilities of astronomers studying the universe by providing images that are significantly sharper than those from existing telescopes. “Detecting objects in the space region between where ...

Immune protein may induce dementia unrelated to high blood pressure

Immune protein may induce dementia unrelated to high blood pressure
2023-12-04
Researchers at Weill Cornell Medicine have found that controlling high blood pressure may not be enough to prevent associated cognitive declines. The findings point to an immune protein called cytokine IL-17 as a culprit for inducing dementia and suggest new approaches to prevent damage to brain cells. The study, published on Dec. 4 in Nature Neuroscience, uncovered a new mechanism involving increased levels of IL-17 in the brain which suppressed blood flow to the brain and induced cognitive impairment in a preclinical model of salt-sensitive high blood pressure. “An ...

Q&A: How can Canada best meet its commitment to protecting 30% of its land by 2030?

2023-12-04
At last year’s COP15 conference in Montreal, the Government of Canada set the goal of conserving 30 percent of the country’s land and water by 2030. In a new study in Nature Communications, a group of McGill University researchers have sought to understand how well our existing protected lands preserve Canadian species, how many species we could save if we reach our 30 by 30 targets, and what factors impact our ability to safeguard species in future conserved areas. Lead author Isaac Eckert, a McGill PhD candidate in Biology, answered some questions about his research. This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity. What ...

Eating disorder hospitalizations on the rise, affecting 'atypical' groups the most

Eating disorder hospitalizations on the rise, affecting atypical groups the most
2023-12-04
Toronto, ON, December 4, 2023 – There was a disproportionate rise in pediatric eating disorder hospitalizations among males, younger adolescents, and individuals with eating disorder diagnoses other than anorexia or bulimia, according to a new study from researchers at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) and ICES.  This large, population-based study spanned a 17-year period in Ontario, Canada (2002-2019), and tracked an overall increase of 139% in eating disorder hospitalizations among children and adolescents, with a total of 11,654 hospitalizations. The number of co-occurring mental illness diagnoses for ...

Brains of newborns aren't underdeveloped compared to other primates

2023-12-04
Contrary to current understanding, the brains of human newborns aren’t significantly less developed compared to other primate species, but appear so because so much brain development happens after birth, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. The study, published in Nature Ecology & Evolution, found that humans are born with brains at a development level that’s typical for similar primate species, but the human brains grow so much larger and more complex than other species after birth, it gives the false impression that human newborns are underdeveloped, or “altricial.” Lead author Dr Aida ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

Artificial intelligence outperforms clinical tests at predicting progress of Alzheimer’s disease

ReMDO announces inaugural Piedmont Triad Regenerative Medicine Engine Ecosystem Summit in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

HarvestHub app tackles supply chain, food insecurity issues

Mathematics outreach program awarded Dolciani grant

Groundbreaking study reveals insights into Alzheimer's disease mechanisms through novel hydrogel matrix

Study examines urban forests across the United States

2023 Rolling Hills Estates landslide likely began the winter before

Rutgers researchers spot potential hazard with private well water treatment

When to trust an AI model

Research shows gamified investment sites have risks for novice investors

Specially equipped natural killer cells show effectiveness against the most common form of ovarian cancer

Entering the golden age for antibody-drug conjugates in gynecologic cancer

Judge: Texas university must release records on research study that resulted in deaths of dozens of animals

UMass Amherst food scientist rises to the challenge of giving marbled fatty feel and taste to plant-based meat

Complex impact of large wildfires on ozone layer dynamics unveiled by new study

Brain inflammation triggers muscle weakness after infections

Research alert: All stem cell therapies are not created equal

Complex impact of large wildfires on ozone layer dynamics

AI found to boost individual creativity – at the expense of less varied content

Texas A&M research collaboration uncovers how domestic rabbits become feral in the wild

Scientists find new way global air churn makes particles

Researchers discover a new neural biomarker for OCD

Vivid portrait of interacting galaxies marks Webb’s second anniversary

UMass Amherst awarded $2.1 million to advance the science of engagement in community-academic research partnerships

With gene editing, mice with a form of inherited deafness can hear again

Sant Pau researchers discover a new gene that causes ALS

Synthetic biology reveals the secrets of life without oxygen

UC3M student startup, Solaris Vita, awarded in Europe's largest entrepreneurship competition

How plant cold specialists can adapt to the environment

Biomarkers reveal how patients with glaucoma may respond to treatment

[Press-News.org] U of M Medical School study finds visions of nonphysical world are common among cognitively healthy Ojibwe individuals