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Social media images of pediatric craniofacial patients – parents voice concerns

Surgeons should seek consent from children as young as nine years, suggests survey in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®

2024-03-29
(Press-News.org) Waltham — March 29, 2024 — Parents voice strong concerns about social media sharing of images of children undergoing craniofacial surgery, reports a survey study in the April issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. 

"Pediatric plastic surgeons must understand that consent and assent are necessary before posting patient images online," comments senior author Kenneth L. Fan, MD, of Georgetown University Hospital. "Based on our findings, we recommend seeking consent from not only the parents but also the children themselves, at ages as young as nine years."  

The study was performed in partnership by researchers from Georgetown and University of Michigan. Dr. Fan's coauthors were Samuel S. Huffman, BS, Peter T. Hetzler III, MD, MHS, Steven B. Baker, MD, DDS, and Christian J. Vercler, MD. 

Study explores parental perceptions of posting children's photos online 

Social media use has become widespread in plastic surgery, raising potential ethical and professional concerns. Sharing patient images can play a valuable role in information and education for plastic surgeons and other healthcare professionals, as well as patients and families. 

Posting images of children with craniofacial deformities poses unique ethical challenges because they show the head and face, by definition they make the child potentially identifiable. While patients always have the right to revoke permission to share images or other personal information, images posted on social media leave a "permanent online footprint." 

The researchers designed an online survey exploring parents' perceptions of social media use by pediatric plastic surgeons. The anonymous survey included examples of full-face pictures of children, ranging from infants to preteens, who underwent craniofacial surgery. All images had been publicly posted by surgeons on popular social media platforms.  

Survey questions highlighted the consent/assent process and professional issues raised by social media posting. Of 656 responding parents, six percent had a child who had been operated on by a plastic surgeon. Parents overwhelmingly believed that surgeons need to obtain consent before posting pictures of children on social media. About 90% of respondents indicated that surgeons must obtain consent from parents before sharing images, regardless of the child's age.  

Social media sharing should 'focus on the vulnerability of the patient' 

Respondents also believed that surgeons should seek consent from the children themselves before sharing images. The average age at which parents thought surgeons needed to obtain the child's consent was 9.65 years. Nearly half of parents felt that surgeons need to document assent for younger children and even for infants – "even if only to say the child is not old enough for proper assent," the researchers write. 

Parents who followed plastic surgeons on social media were more likely to believe that surgeons need to document assent from all pediatric patients. Forty percent of parents felt that children portrayed in pictures on social media were being exploited, regardless of age. This view was more common among parents with higher levels of education. 

"Our study suggests that a strong majority of parents believe that surgeons should obtain written consent from parents before posting pictures of pediatric patients on social media," Dr. Fan and colleagues write. They note that this finding is consistent with the ASPS Code of Ethics social media policy, which can be found here.  

Dr. Fan and coauthors conclude: "The use of social media by craniofacial plastic surgeons has the promise to positively affect the field, but it must be done professionally and ethically with an intentional focus on the vulnerability of the patient." 

[ Read Article: "Parents’ Perceptions of Social Media Use by Pediatric Plastic Surgeons" ] 

Wolters Kluwer provides trusted clinical technology and evidence-based solutions that engage clinicians, patients, researchers and students in effective decision-making and outcomes across healthcare. We support clinical effectiveness, learning and research, clinical surveillance and compliance, as well as data solutions. For more information about our solutions, visit https://www.wolterskluwer.com/en/health. 

### 

About Wolters Kluwer 

Wolters Kluwer (EURONEXT: WKL) is a global leader in information, software solutions and services for professionals in healthcare; tax and accounting; financial and corporate compliance; legal and regulatory; corporate performance and ESG. We help our customers make critical decisions every day by providing expert solutions that combine deep domain knowledge with technology and services. 

Wolters Kluwer reported 2023 annual revenues of €5.6 billion. The group serves customers in over 180 countries, maintains operations in over 40 countries, and employs approximately 21,400 people worldwide. The company is headquartered in Alphen aan den Rijn, the Netherlands.  

For more information, visit www.wolterskluwer.com, follow us on LinkedIn, Facebook, YouTube and Instagram. 

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[Press-News.org] Social media images of pediatric craniofacial patients – parents voice concerns
Surgeons should seek consent from children as young as nine years, suggests survey in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®