PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

New Paradigm of Peace through Health: Traditional Medicine Meditation in the Prevention of Collective Stress, Violence, and War

2024-04-03
(Press-News.org) A breakthrough perspective article in Frontiers in Public Health, "Peace through Health: Traditional Medicine Meditation in the Prevention of Collective Stress Violence and War," sheds light on the profound impact of the Transcendental Meditation (TM) program on fostering global peace. The article reviews and analyzes the demand for public health and medicine to help prevent collective violence and “intractable” wars in the Middle East, Eastern Europe, Africa and elsewhere and the crucial role of meditation practices in public health strategies to mitigate collective stress and armed conflicts.

Highlighting compelling research, the article presents data demonstrating significant reductions in crime rates and war intensity when relatively small groups of people engage in the practice of the TM and TM-Sidhi Program. For instance, "The introduction of group meditation was associated with a noticeable decrease in violent incidents and improved quality of life metrics in conflict zones, underscoring meditation’s potential to influence societal peace," the authors note.

Robert H. Schneider, MD, FACC, Dean of the College of Integrative Medicine at Maharishi International University, explains, "Our review indicates that when a relatively small group (square root of 1%) of a population participates in these meditation programs there's a correlated drop in societal stress and violence indicators. This underscores a collective consciousness effect that can be scientifically measured. Indeed, recognizing the profound effects of meditation on public health and peace represents a paradigm shift in both public health and medicine—fostering peace through health."

The article delves into the neuroscience behind these observations, particularly through the lens of population neuroscience. It suggests that group meditation practices may synchronize brain activities across individuals, leading to enhanced societal coherence and reduced stress-related behaviors. "Population neuroscience offers us a framework to understand how collective meditation can stabilize societal stress and what we may call collective consciousness, potentially averting collective violence and wars," states Tony Nader, MD, PhD, a leading expert in the neuroscience of consciousness.

Gunvant Yeola MD, PhD (Ayurveda), Principal of the DY Patil College of Ayurveda in India, adds, "Ayurveda and Yoga have long recognized the interconnection between individual wellness and societal health. These findings provide a modern scientific validation of ancient wisdom, highlighting meditation's role in public health and peacebuilding."

In advocating for integrating traditional meditation practices into public health initiatives, the authors envision a new paradigm where meditation becomes a foundational strategy for preventing violence and promoting peace globally. "This research represents a beacon of hope, illuminating a path forward where peace is cultivated from within each individual, radiating outwards to transform societies," concludes Schneider.

As the world continues to navigate the complexities of global conflict, this perspective article highlights and explains the transformative power of meditation, offering a scientifically grounded approach to achieving peace through health.

END


ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

Machine learning enables viability of vertical-axis wind turbines

Machine learning enables viability of vertical-axis wind turbines
2024-04-03
If you imagine an industrial wind turbine, you likely picture the windmill design, technically known as a horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT). But the very first wind turbines, which were developed in the Middle East around the 8th century for grinding grain, were vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWT), meaning they spun perpendicular to the wind, rather than parallel. Due to their slower rotation speed, VAWTs are less noisy than HAWTs and achieve greater wind energy density, meaning they need less space for ...

E-cigarette users now more likely to quit traditional cigarettes

2024-04-03
A new paper in Nicotine & Tobacco Research, published by Oxford University Press, finds that smokers who switch to electronic cigarettes are now more likely to stop smoking regular cigarettes. In the past, smokers who began using electronic cigarettes mostly continued smoking. Electronic nicotine delivery systems first emerged on the U.S. market in 2007. The first e-cigarettes resembled conventional cigarettes (in appearance) and used fixed low-voltage batteries. Beginning in 2016, manufacturers introduced e-liquids containing nicotine salt formulations. These new e-cigarettes became widely available. These nicotine salts are lower in pH than freebase formulations, which allow manufacturers ...

Chatbot guides women through post-prison challenges

2024-04-03
Most women leaving prison face profound disadvantages and rarely have access to the resources needed to settle back into the community. Seemingly simple tasks such as obtaining replacement identification documents or opening a bank account become tangled in complexities. Now researchers at the University of South Australia are co-designing a chatbot to help formerly incarcerated women re-establish their lives on the outside, and reduce the risk of them returning to prison. Led by a team of UniSA researchers in collaboration with advocacy group Seeds of Affinity, the tech-based solution aims to help women access trusted ...

Doctors on front line of tackling childhood obesity but more training and resources needed

2024-04-03
Doctors are feeling unable to tackle growing problem of childhood obesity due to a lack of training and capacity according to new research. In a paper published in the British Journal of General Practice, researchers from the University of Birmingham conducted in-depth interviews with healthcare professionals (HCPs) to understand their experiences of supporting families to tackle childhood obesity. One participant in the study said: “I had one mum and her child was overweight, but she was a young parent and she actually didn’t know how to cook the dinners and, yeah… we spent a lot of time with her giving her ...

Galaxies get more chaotic as they age

Galaxies get more chaotic as they age
2024-04-03
Galaxies start life with their stars rotating in an orderly pattern but in some the motion of stars in more random. Until now, scientists have been uncertain about what causes this – possibly the surrounding environment or the mass of the galaxy itself. A new study, published in a paper today in MNRAS (Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society), has found that the most important factor is neither of these things. It shows the tendency of the stars to have random motion is driven mostly by the age of the galaxy – things just get messy over time. “When we did the analysis, we found that age, consistently, whichever way we slice or dice it, is always the most ...

Sandia pumps $140B into the economy through technology development

Sandia pumps $140B into the economy through technology development
2024-04-03
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — To say that the technology and products Sandia National Laboratories researchers have helped imagine, innovate and industrialize have had a massive impact on the country would be an understatement. Two studies commissioned by Sandia and the National Nuclear Security Administration show Sandia’s work has had an overall economic impact of $140 billion since the year 2000. That’s a significant figure, especially considering it spans just 20 years, less than a third of Sandia’s 75-year existence. “I am very proud of how Sandia excels in fulfilling its technology transfer mission to deliver economic impact to the U.S.,” ...

Even moderate alcohol usage during pregnancy linked to birth abnormalities, UNM researchers find

2024-04-03
University of New Mexico researchers have found that even low to moderate alcohol use by pregnant patients may contribute to subtle changes in their babies’ prenatal development, including lower birth length and a shorter duration of gestation. In a new paper published in the journal Alcohol Clinical & Experimental Research, a team led by Ludmila Bakhireva, MD, PhD, MPH, professor and assistant dean for Clinical and Translational Research in the UNM College of Pharmacy, also reported some sex-related differences in the effects of drinking during pregnancy on the developing ...

Sylvester physician co-authors global plan to combat prostate cancer

Sylvester physician co-authors global plan to combat prostate cancer
2024-04-03
MIAMI, FLORIDA (EMBARGOED UNTIL APRIL 4, 2024, at 6:30 pm EDT) – Annual prostate cancer cases worldwide are projected to double by the year 2040, and annual deaths are projected to increase by 85% to almost 700,000 over the same timeframe – mainly among men in low- and middle-income countries. A commissioned report published online in The Lancet on April 4 highlights the future landscape of prostate cancer and seeks to guide cancer experts worldwide on how to manage the massive influx of prostate cancer patients projected over the next two decades. Brandon Mahal, M.D., radiation oncologist and ...

Last chance to record archaic Greek language ‘heading for extinction’

Last chance to record archaic Greek language ‘heading for extinction’
2024-04-03
A new data crowdsourcing platform aims to preserve the sound of Romeyka, an endangered millennia-old variety of Greek. Experts consider the language to be a linguistic goldmine and a living bridge to the ancient world.   The initiative, led by Professor Ioanna Sitaridou from the University of Cambridge, contributes to the UN’s International Decade of Indigenous Languages (2022-32), which aims ‘to draw global attention on the critical situation of many indigenous languages and to mobilise stakeholders and resources for their preservation, revitalization and promotion.’ Romeyka is thought to have only a couple of thousand ...

Chicks prove vision and touch linked at birth

2024-04-03
Newly hatched chicks raised in darkness and allowed to touch either a smooth or bumpy cube for 24 hours instantly recognised the object with their vision upon first exposure to light.   This suggests chicks can link touch and vision without any prior experience combining these senses, challenging the long-held belief that such integration requires learning.   The discovery implies a pre-wired ability in the brain for cross-modal perception, potentially redefining our understanding of animal cognition and sensory processing.  In a study published in Biology Letters, researchers at Queen Mary University of London have cracked ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

New Inflammatory Bowel Disease testing protocol could speed up diagnosis

Most massive stellar black hole in our galaxy found

New review offers first recommendations on accurately assessing the carbon footprint of coffee farming

Seed ferns: Plants experimented with complex leaf vein networks 201 million years ago

New statewide research reveals the staggering economic cost of intimate partner violence in Louisiana

From ashes to adversity: Lessons from South Australia's business recovery amidst bushfires and pandemic

Multiple pollutants from crop and livestock production in the Yangtze River: status and challenges

Unraveling the unique role of DELLA proteins in grapevine flowering: A shift in developmental fate

Next-generation treatments hitch a ride into cancer cells

Unraveling the role of DlBGAL9 and AGL61/80 in Longan somatic embryogenesis and heat stress tolerance: A multi-omics approach

Decoding pecan pollination: A dive into the chloroplast genome of 'Xinxuan-4' and its impact on cultivar diversity and efficiency

KD-crowd: A knowledge distillation framework for learning from crowds

Can animals count?

Australian media need generative AI policies to help navigate misinformation and disinformation

Illuminating the path to hearing recovery

Unlocking the secrets of fruit quality: How anthocyanins and acidity shape consumer preferences and market value

Evidence for reversible oxygen ion movement during electrical pulsing: enabler of the emerging ferroelectricity in binary oxides

Revolutionizing Citrus cultivation: The superior tolerance and growth vigor of 'Shuzhen No.1' rootstock

Family and media pressure to lose weight in adolescence linked to how people value themselves almost two decades later

Despite the desire to reduce the risk of imitation, new research suggests startups should scale slowly and steadily

The Lancet: Many people with breast cancer ‘systematically left behind’ due to inaction on inequities and hidden suffering

From opioid overdose to treatment initiation: outcomes associated with peer support in emergency departments

NIH awards $3.4 million to Wayne State University to investigate biomarkers for better reproductive success

New study shows corporate misconduct at home hurts sales overseas

Take it from the rats: A junk food diet can cause long-term damage to adolescent brains

Fralin Biomedical Research Institute team unpacking genetic mysteries of childhood epilepsies

UNC-Chapel Hill researchers discover new clues to how tardigrades can survive intense radiation

UT Arlington prioritizes entrepreneurship efforts

Ochsner Health receives 2024 Top Workplaces Culture Excellence Awards

Are these newly found rare cells a missing link in color perception?

[Press-News.org] New Paradigm of Peace through Health: Traditional Medicine Meditation in the Prevention of Collective Stress, Violence, and War