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Soft Robotics appoints new Deputy Editor-in-Chief, Barbara Mazzolai, PhD

Soft Robotics appoints new Deputy Editor-in-Chief, Barbara Mazzolai, PhD
2024-04-12
(Press-News.org) Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., is pleased that Barbara Mazzolai, PhD, has been appointed the new Deputy Editor-in-Chief of the bimonthly journal Soft Robotics. Dr. Mazzolai joins Barry Trimmer, PhD, as part of the executive editorial team for the journal.

Soft Robotics is the leading robotics journal devoted to the emerging technologies and developments of soft and deformable robots.  The journal’s coverage includes flexible electronics, materials science, computer science, and biomechanics. The journal breaks new ground as the first to answer the urgent need for research on robotic technology that can safely interact with living systems and function in complex natural or human-built environments.

“Barbara is a respected researcher in the field of soft robotics, with a history of pioneering work in Biomimetics and alternative engineering. Her innovative, creative, and rigorous approach to research has played a key role in the development of the field. She has also been instrumental in organizing conferences, workshops, and collaborative proposals, demonstrating strong leadership and expertise. I am grateful for her contributions to our flagship journal, Soft Robotics, and am confident that her involvement will help ensure its continued success,” said Dr. Trimmer.

“I am honored to have the opportunity to serve as Deputy Editor-in-Chief for Soft Robotics. We are witnessing rapid advancements in soft robotics, both at the scientific and industrial levels. Prof. Trimmer and our editorial board have been instrumental in providing a highly esteemed journal that is significantly enhancing the impact of this field,” said Dr. Mazzolai.

Dr. Mazzolai is the Associate Director for Robotics and the Director of the Bioinspired Soft Robotics Laboratory at the Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Genoa. Additionally, she holds the position of Contract Professor in Soft Robotics at the Politecnico of Milan. She is actively engaged in various international boards, including the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society (RAS) Administrative Committee (AdCom), the Scientific Advisory Board of the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems (Tübingen and Stuttgart, Germany), the Max Planck Queensland Centre (MPQC) for the Materials Science of Extracellular Matrices, and the Advisory Committee of the Cluster on Living Adaptive and Energy-autonomous Materials Systems - livMatS (Freiburg, Germany). Dr. Mazzolai, a biologist and bioengineer, directs her research efforts towards mimicking plants and soft animals. She integrates principles from nature with artificial methodologies to drive technological innovation and deepen scientific understanding.

About the Journal
Soft Robotics is an authoritative peer-reviewed journal published 6 times per year with open access options and in print that reports on advancements in the creations of soft and deformable robots. Tables of content may be viewed on the Soft Robotics website. 

About the Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a global media company dedicated to creating, curating, and delivering impactful peer-reviewed research and authoritative content services to advance the fields of biotechnology and the life sciences, specialized clinical medicine, and public health and policy. For complete information, please visit the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

END


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[Press-News.org] Soft Robotics appoints new Deputy Editor-in-Chief, Barbara Mazzolai, PhD