PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

New SPECT/CT technique shows impressive biomarker identification, offers increased access for prostate cancer patients

New SPECT/CT technique shows impressive biomarker identification, offers increased access for prostate cancer patients
2024-04-17
(Press-News.org) Reston, VA—A novel SPECT/CT acquisition method can accurately detect radiopharmaceutical biodistribution in a convenient manner for prostate cancer patients, opening the door for more personalized treatment. Utilizing lead-212 (212Pb), the new imaging technique has the potential to change practice and increase access for patients around the world. The first-in-human images from this method were published in the April issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

There is significant interest in the development of 212Pb-PSMA–based targeted alpha therapy (TAT) for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. However, 212Pb is a challenging isotope to image because of the high-energy gamma rays generate significant scatter.

“The ability to acquire imaging of an alpha-emitter with a standard SPECT camera and standard collimator within a convenient acquisition time for the patient could provide more precision in how we treat patients with prostate cancer, and patients with other cancers, in the future. Confirming the presence of the drug in the target is important because it serves as a quality assurance and can be used to derive an understanding of the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of the drug,” said Stephen Rose, PhD, head of Translational Medicine and Clinical Science at AdvanCell.

In the study, researchers administered 60 MBq of 212Pb-ADVC001 to a 73-year-old man with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. SPECT/CT imaging occurred at 1.5, 5, 20, and 28 hours after infusion.

Representative 212Pb SPECT/CT images showed rapid tumor uptake of 212Pb-ADVC001 in agreement with tumor burden shown on the pretreatment 18F-DCFPyl PET/CT images. Images acquired after 20 hours showed persistent tumor uptake despite low counts due to 212Pb decay.

“In the future, this imaging technique can help to streamline the drug development process, driving conviction in the agents we bring to larger scale trials. In addition, the ability to image 212Pb with a standard SPECT camera in a relatively short timeframe means that 212Pb is a true theranostic alpha-emitter and could be a valuable in selecting patients for targeted alpha-therapies,” said Rose

He continued, “What’s more, access to PET imaging is a bottleneck, in the United States and globally. SPECT cameras are more widely available and may address this critical issue, as SPECT imaging can be used for patient selection, therapy decision making, and guiding adaptive dosing strategies based on changes of target expression and tumor volume during treatment.”

The study was published online in February 2024.

The authors of “First-in-Human 212Pb-PSMA–Targeted α-Therapy SPECT/CT Imaging in a Patient with Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer” include Matthew R. Griffiths, David A. Pattison, and Melissa Latter, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Specialist PET Services, Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Kevin Kuan, Stephen Taylor, William Tieu, Thomas Kryza, Danielle Meyrick Boon Quan Lee, Stephen E. Rose, and Simon G. Puttick, AdvanCell, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; and Aaron Hansen, Department of Medical Oncology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

Visit the JNM website for the latest research, and follow our new Twitter and Facebook pages @JournalofNucMed or follow us on LinkedIn.

###

Please visit the SNMMI Media Center for more information about molecular imaging and precision imaging. To schedule an interview with the researchers, please contact Rebecca Maxey at (703) 652-6772 or rmaxey@snmmi.org.

About JNM and the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

The Journal of Nuclear Medicine (JNM) is the world’s leading nuclear medicine, molecular imaging and theranostics journal, accessed more than 16 million times each year by practitioners around the globe, providing them with the information they need to advance this rapidly expanding field. Current and past issues of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine can be found online at http://jnm.snmjournals.org.

JNM is published by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI), an international scientific and medical organization dedicated to advancing nuclear medicine and molecular imaging—precision medicine that allows diagnosis and treatment to be tailored to individual patients in order to achieve the best possible outcomes. For more information, visit www.snmmi.org

END


[Attachments] See images for this press release:
New SPECT/CT technique shows impressive biomarker identification, offers increased access for prostate cancer patients New SPECT/CT technique shows impressive biomarker identification, offers increased access for prostate cancer patients 2

ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

Study identifies new metric for diagnosing autism

Study identifies new metric for diagnosing autism
2024-04-17
Autism spectrum disorder has yet to be linked to a single cause, due to the wide range of its symptoms and severity. However, a study by University of Virginia researchers suggests a promising new approach to finding answers, one that could lead to advances in the study of other neurological diseases and disorders. Current approaches to autism research involve observing and understanding the disorder through the study of its behavioral consequences, using techniques like functional magnetic resonance imaging ...

Researchers create new AI pipeline for identifying molecular interactions

2024-04-17
Understanding how proteins interact with each other is crucial for developing new treatments and understanding diseases. Thanks to computational advances, a team of researchers led by Assistant Professor of Chemistry Alberto Perez has developed a groundbreaking algorithm to identify these molecular interactions. Perez’s research team included two graduate students from UF, Arup Mondal and Bhumika Singh, and a handful of researchers from Rutgers University and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. The team published their findings in Angewandte Chemie, a leading ...

Clearing the air: Wind farms more land efficient than previously thought

2024-04-17
Wind power is a source of energy that is both affordable and renewable. However, decision-makers have been reluctant to invest in wind energy due to a perception that wind farms require a lot of land compared to electric power plants driven by fossil fuels. Research led by McGill University and based on the assessment of the land-use of close to 320 wind farms in the U.S. (the largest study of its kind) paints a very different picture. Misplaced preconceptions about the land use of gas-fuelled electricity The study, which was published recently in Environmental Science and Technology, shows that, when ...

Fracking the future: how Congolese oil extraction has shaped its history and its fate

2024-04-17
In 1969, the recently independent Republic of Congo discovered an enormous oil field off its coast. The find represented both a rare opportunity for the burgeoning nation, and a potential threat – the revenue generated by oil extraction could either pave the way for a stable socialist society, or doom the country to exploitation much like that it had endured under French colonialism. A new paper in Critical Historical Studies, “Enclosed Futures: Oil Extraction in the Republic of Congo,” demonstrates ...

Paper: To understand cognition—and its dysfunction—neuroscientists must learn its rhythms

Paper: To understand cognition—and its dysfunction—neuroscientists must learn its rhythms
2024-04-17
It could be very informative to observe the pixels on your phone under a microscope, but not if your goal is to understand what a whole video on the screen shows. Cognition is much the same kind of emergent property in the brain. It can only be understood by observing how millions of cells act in coordination, argues a trio of MIT neuroscientists. In a new article, they lay out a framework for understanding how thought arises from the coordination of neural activity driven by oscillating electric fields—also known ...

First evidence of human occupation in lava tube cave in Saudi Arabia

First evidence of human occupation in lava tube cave in Saudi Arabia
2024-04-17
Recent strides in interdisciplinary archaeological research in Arabia have unveiled new insights into the evolution and historical development of regional human populations, as well as the dynamic patterns of cultural change, migration, and adaptation to environmental fluctuations.  Despite the challenges posed by limited preservation of archaeological assemblages and organic remains in arid environments, these discoveries are reshaping our understanding of the region's rich cultural heritage.  One such breakthrough led by Griffith University’s Australian ...

New data identifies trends in accidental opioid overdoses in children

New data identifies trends in accidental opioid overdoses in children
2024-04-17
The US saw a 22% decline in rates of prescription-opioid overdose related emergency department (ED) visits in children 17 and younger between 2008 and 2019, but an uptick in the early part of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study published this week in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Henry Xiang of Nationwide Children’s Hospital, US, and colleagues. The authors also note that rates of pediatric opioid overdoses remain high in many populations. Opioid overdose has been declared a public health emergency in the United States but much of the focus has been on adults. In the new study, researchers analyzed overdoses ...

An international sample of adolescents shows almost 17% experience weight-related bullying online, especially for social media users—with almost 70 percent of Twitter users reporting being bullied

An international sample of adolescents shows almost 17% experience weight-related bullying online, especially for social media users—with almost 70 percent of Twitter users reporting being bullied
2024-04-17
From a survey of about 12,000 adolescents from Australia, Canada, Chile, Mexico, the US, and the UK, about 17 percent of respondents reported experiencing weight-related bullying online, especially users of Twitter and Twitch, according to a study published April 17, 2023 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Kyle Ganson from University of Toronto, Canada, and colleagues. Screen time and social media use are common among adolescents—and people in general—for entertainment and social connection, though many cons exist, including cyberbullying. Here, Ganson and colleagues investigated weight-related bullying in adolescents across different ...

Humans occupied a lava tube in Saudi Arabia for thousands of years

Humans occupied a lava tube in Saudi Arabia for thousands of years
2024-04-17
A large lava tube in Saudia Arabia provided valuable shelter for humans herding livestock over at least the past 7,000 years, according to a study published April 17, 2024 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Mathew Stewart of Griffith University, Brisbane and colleagues. Research in northern Arabia over the last decade has highlighted a diverse Holocene archaeological record. However, the timing of human occupations and their connections with the nearby Levant remain poorly understood, primarily due to poor preservation of organic remains in the region’s arid conditions. To circumvent this problem, Stewart ...

Watching a video could change your attitude to rattlesnakes - though results varied by age, gender, religion and rattlesnake experience

Watching a video could change your attitude to rattlesnakes - though results varied by age, gender, religion and rattlesnake experience
2024-04-17
Watching a video could change your attitude to rattlesnakes - though results varied by age, gender, religion and rattlesnake experience ### Article URL:  https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0298737 Article Title: Effects of relational and instrumental messaging on human perception of rattlesnakes Author Countries: USA Funding: The author(s) received no specific funding for this work. END ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

Lab-grown muscles reveal mysteries of rare muscle diseases

Primary hepatic angiosarcoma: Treatment options for a rare tumor

Research finds causal evidence tying cerebral small-vessel disease to Alzheimer’s, dementia

Navigating the Pyrocene: Recent Cell Press papers on managing fire risk

Restoring the Great Salt Lake would have environmental justice as well as ecological benefits

Cannabis, tobacco use, and COVID-19 outcomes

A 5:2 intermittent fasting meal replacement diet and glycemic control for adults with diabetes

Scientists document self-propelling oxygen decline in the oceans

Activating molecular target reverses multiple hallmarks of aging

Cannabis use tied to increased risk of severe COVID-19

How to make ageing a ‘fairer game’ for all wormkind

Supporting the right small changes can have big impacts

Grafted cucumbers get a boost: pumpkin's secret to withstanding salinity

Unlocking broccoli's genome: key to enhanced health benefits

New insights into methyl jasmonate-induced saponin biosynthesis in balloon flower

Unraveling the role of ADGRF5: Insights into kidney health and function

JMIR Dermatology accepted for MEDLINE indexing

Reduced infections seen in CLL and NHL patients undergoing immunoglobulin testing and replacement therapy

Human activity: A double-edged sword in the face of drought

Portfolio performance in financial management: apraize, analyze, act.

Landmark Nature Medicine study reports promising new treatment reduces suffering in Sanfilippo syndrome

Membrane protein analogues could accelerate drug discovery

Berkeley Lab researchers advance AI-driven plant root analysis

Cleveland Clinic study shows weight loss surgery cuts risk of heart complications and death in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and obesity

SQUID pries open AI black box

Resiliency shaped by activity in the gut microbiome and brain

Inspired by nature: synthetic nightshade molecule effective against leukemia cells

Promise green hydrogen may not always be fulfilled

Unifying behavioral analysis through animal foundation models

Up to 30 percent more time: Climate change makes it harder for women to collect water

[Press-News.org] New SPECT/CT technique shows impressive biomarker identification, offers increased access for prostate cancer patients