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How does the motor relearning program improve neurological function of brain ischemia?

2013-07-24
(Press-News.org) The motor relearning program can significantly improve various functional disturbance induced by ischemic cerebrovascular diseases. However, its mechanism of action remains poorly understood. According to a study published in the Neural Regeneration Research (Vol. 8, No. 16, 2013), models of ischemic brain injury in the rhesus macaque were induced by electrocoagulation of the M1 segment of the right middle cerebral artery, then the motor relearning program was after model establishment. Glial fibrillary acidic protein and neurofilament protein expression changes could reflect the repair status of damaged neurons and astrocytes, while vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor could reflect angiogenesis in damaged brain tissue. Researchers found that the motor relearning program significantly promoted neuronal regeneration, repair and angiogenesis in the surroundings of the infarcted hemisphere, and improve neurological function in the rhesus macaque following brain ischemia, which provides a new theoretical idea for the clinical treatment of brain ischemia.



INFORMATION:

Article: " How does the motor relearning program improve neurological function of brain ischemia monkeys?" by Yong Yin1, Zhen Gu2, Lei Pan1, Lu Gan1, Dongdong Qin3, Bo Yang4, Jin Guo5, Xintian Hu3, Tinghua Wang6, Zhongtang Feng6 (1 Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Fourth Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming 650021, Yunnan Province, China; 2 Department of Neurosurgery, Fourth Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming 650021, Yunnan Province, China; 3 Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650223, Yunnan Province, China; 4 Department of Nuclear Medicine, Fourth Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming 650021, Yunnan Province, China; 5 Department of Pathology, Fourth Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming 650021, Yunnan Province, China; 6 Institute of Neuroscience, Kunming Medical University, Kunming 650500, Yunnan Province, China)

Yin Y, Gu Z, Pan L, Gan L, Qin DD, Yang B, Guo J, Hu XT, Wang TH, Feng ZT. How does the motor relearning program improve neurological function of brain ischemia monkeys? Neural Regen Res. 2013;8(16):1445-1454.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research
http://www.nrronline.org/

Full text: http://www.sjzsyj.org:8080/Jweb_sjzs/CN/article/downloadArticleFile.do?attachType=PDF&id=613



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[Press-News.org] How does the motor relearning program improve neurological function of brain ischemia?