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NASA sees Genevieve squeezed between 3 tropical systems

NASA sees Genevieve squeezed between 3 tropical systems
2014-07-31
(Press-News.org) The resurrected Tropical Depression Genevieve appears squeezed between three other developing areas of low pressure. Satellite data from NOAA and NASA continue to show a lot of tropical activity in the Eastern and Central Pacific Oceans on July 31.

NASA/NOAA's GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland has been kept busy, providing visible and infrared satellite imagery of the Eastern and Central Pacific Oceans. The project uses data from NOAA's GOES-West and GOES-East satellites to create images and animations. All four systems were captured in a combination infrared and visible image from July 31 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT).

At 5 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC/11 a.m. EDT) the center of tropical depression Genevieve was located near latitude 13.1 north, longitude 150.5 west. That's about 550 miles (880 km) southeast of Hilo, Hawaii. The depression is moving toward the west near 6 mph, 9 km/h. This general motion is forecast to continue through tonight, with a slight increase in forward speed expected on Friday.

Genevieve's maximum sustained winds were near 35 mph (55 kph) and little change in intensity is forecast through Friday night, August 1, according to the Central Pacific Hurricane Center. The estimated minimum central pressure is 1009 millibars. There are no watches or warnings in effect for Hawaii.

System 91C West of Genevieve

To the west of Genevieve lies a disorganized and elongated area of showers and isolated thunderstorms. System 91C is located about 850 miles southwest of Oahu. NOAA's Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) noted that the surrounding environment may permit this system to develop slightly during the next couple of days as it drifts slowly to the west. It was centered near 11.9 north latitude and 164.8 west longitude today and has a 20 percent chance of development over the next two days.

A Low Pressure Area to the East of Genevieve

To the east of Genevieve is an undesignated area of low pressure. That low was located about 1,550 miles east-southeast of the Big Island of Hawaii and CPHC noted that it was producing disorganized cloudiness and showers. Upper-level winds are only marginally favorable, and any development of this system should be slow to occur while it moves westward at about 10 mph during the next few days. This low has a 10 percent chance of development in the next couple of days.

System 95E Ramping Up in Eastern Pacific

Further east, in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, lies a third developing tropical low pressure area designated as System 95E. System 95E was located at 11.4 north latitude and 122.0 west longitude. That puts System 95E about 1,100 miles southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico.

NOAA's National Hurricane Center (NHC) is in charge of monitoring this low pressure area and noted "Environmental conditions appear conducive for further development, and a tropical depression is forecast to form during the next day or two while the system moves west-northwestward at about 10 mph." The NHC gives System 95E a high chance of becoming the Eastern Pacific's next tropical depression over the next couple of days.

INFORMATION: Text credit: Rob Gutro NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

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NASA sees Genevieve squeezed between 3 tropical systems

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[Press-News.org] NASA sees Genevieve squeezed between 3 tropical systems