PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
FREE PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

How many tests after vasectomy? Guideline update leads to change in practice

2021-01-12
(Press-News.org) January 12, 2021 - A change in evidence-based guidelines for vasectomy may have led to a reduction in the number of follow-up tests to confirm the procedure was successful, reports a study in Urology Practice®, an Official Journal of the American Urological Association (AUA). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Originally published in 2012, and then updated in 2015, the AUA clinical guideline could significantly reduce the number of men undergoing multiple postvasectomy semen analyses (PVSAs) to confirm it's safe to stop using other methods of birth control, according to new research by Tony Chen, MD, of University of Washington, Seattle, and colleagues. Dr. Chen comments: "Our study of nearly 90,000 patients strongly suggests that men underwent fewer repeat PVSAs after the guideline update, potentially avoiding many unnecessary tests and reducing costs."

One-third reduction in repeat testing after vasectomy Vasectomy is a safe and highly effective method of permanent contraception in men, performed about 500,000 times per year in the United States. Follow-up PVSA tests, done two to four months after the procedure, are recommended to confirm that vasectomy was successful. Previous standard of practice called for two consecutive PVSAs showing no measurable sperm count (azoospermia).

However, there were concerns this previous practice may have been inconvenient for patients while leading to increased costs. Meanwhile, new evidence suggested that less-stringent criteria might be just as effective in confirming the success of vasectomy. The 2012 AUA guidelines called for just one PVSA showing no or only rare, nonmoving (nonmotile) sperm.

Dr. Chen and colleagues used a national insurance claims database to analyze more than 87,000 men who underwent vasectomy and had at least one claim for follow-up PVSA between 2007 and 2015. Data from before and after the 2012 AUA guideline update were used to see if the new recommendation coincided with a reduced number of PVSAs performed.

The percentage of men undergoing repeat PVSAs decreased after the guideline update: from 39 percent in 2007-12 to 31 percent in 2013-15. After adjustment for other factors, the percentage of vasectomy patients undergoing repeat PVSA decreased by about one-third (odds ratio 0.68).

There was also a small, but significant reduction in the percentage of men undergoing three or more PVSAs (odds ratio 0.82). Men who had only one PVSA had longer average times to the first follow-up test. That was consistent with an AUA recommendation to wait within a range of 8 to 16 weeks before the first PVSA.

Dr. Chen and colleagues note some important limitations of their study. Many urologists "bundle" the vasectomy procedure and follow-up testing, meaning there's no new insurance claim when PVSA is performed. Nearly 80 percent of vasectomy patients in the database had no separate claims for PVSA.

"Although we can't prove that the reduction in repeat PVSAs resulted directly from the new guidelines, the results are strongly suggestive that they had an impact," Dr. Chen adds. "If the one-third reduction we found is correct and applicable to the male population at large, that will mean a significant reduction in costs and inconvenience related to follow-up testing for the many thousands of men who undergo vasectomy each year." The researchers call for further studies "to improve adherence to clinical guidelines and optimize value for this commonly performed procedure."

INFORMATION:

Click here to read "Association of the 2012 American Urological Association Vasectomy Guidelines with National Trends in Vasectomy Followup in the United States." DOI: 10.1097/UPJ.0000000000000196

About Urology Practice An Official Journal of the American Urological Association (AUA), Urology Practice focuses on clinical trends, challenges and practice applications in the four areas of Business, Health Policy, the Specialty and Patient Care. Information that can be used in everyday practice will be provided to the urology community via peer-reviewed clinical practice articles (including best practices, reviews, clinical guidelines, select clinical trials, editorials and white papers), "research letters" (brief original studies with an important clinical message), the business of the practice of urology, urology health policy issues, urology education and training, as well as content for urology care team members.

About the American Urological Association Founded in 1902 and headquartered near Baltimore, Maryland, the American Urological Association is a leading advocate for the specialty of urology, and has nearly 24,000 members throughout the world. The AUA is a premier urologic association, providing invaluable support to the urologic community as it pursues its mission of fostering the highest standards of urologic care through education, research and the formulation of health care policy. To learn more about the AUA visit: http://www.auanet.org.

About Wolters Kluwer Wolters Kluwer (WKL) is a global leader in professional information, software solutions, and services for the clinicians, nurses, accountants, lawyers, and tax, finance, audit, risk, compliance, and regulatory sectors. We help our customers make critical decisions every day by providing expert solutions that combine deep domain knowledge with advanced technology and services.

Wolters Kluwer reported 2019 annual revenues of €4.6 billion. The group serves customers in over 180 countries, maintains operations in over 40 countries, and employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide. The company is headquartered in Alphen aan den Rijn, the Netherlands.

Wolters Kluwer provides trusted clinical technology and evidence-based solutions that engage clinicians, patients, researchers and students with advanced clinical decision support, learning and research and clinical intelligence. For more information about our solutions, visit https://www.wolterskluwer.com/en/health and follow us on LinkedIn and Twitter @WKHealth.

For more information, visit http://www.wolterskluwer.com, follow us on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube.



ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

Soil degradation costs U.S. corn farmers a half-billion dollars every year

Soil degradation costs U.S. corn farmers a half-billion dollars every year
2021-01-12
One-third of the fertilizer applied to grow corn in the U.S. each year simply compensates for the ongoing loss of soil fertility, leading to more than a half-billion dollars in extra costs to U.S. farmers every year, finds new research from the University of Colorado Boulder published last month in Earth's Future. Long-term soil fertility is on the decline in agricultural lands around the world due to salinization, acidification, erosion and the loss of important nutrients in the soil such as nitrogen and phosphorus. Corn farmers in the U.S. offset these losses with nitrogen and ...

Enlightening dark ions

2021-01-12
Every field has its underlying principles. For economics it's the rational actor; biology has the theory of evolution; modern geology rests on the bedrock of plate tectonics. Physics has conservation laws and symmetries. For instance, the law of conservation of energy - which holds that energy can neither be created nor destroyed -- has guided research in physics since antiquity, becoming more formalized as time went on. Likewise, parity symmetry suggests that switching an event for its mirror image shouldn't affect the outcome. As physicists have worked to understand the truly bizarre rules ...

Study of flowers with two types of anthers solves mystery that baffled Darwin

Study of flowers with two types of anthers solves mystery that baffled Darwin
2021-01-12
Most flowering plants depend on pollinators such as bees to transfer pollen from the male anthers of one flower to the female stigma of another flower, enabling fertilization and the production of fruits and seeds. Bee pollination, however, involves an inherent conflict of interest, because bees are only interested in pollen as a food source. "The bee and the plant have different goals, so plants have evolved ways to optimize the behavior of bees to maximize the transfer of pollen between flowers," explained Kathleen Kay, associate professor of ecology ...

High doses of saccharin don't lead to diabetes in healthy adults, study finds

2021-01-12
COLUMBUS, Ohio - For those trying to live a healthy lifestyle, the choice between sugar and artificial sweeteners such as saccharin can be confusing. A new study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and The Ohio State University College of Medicine found the sugar substitute saccharin doesn't lead to the development of diabetes in healthy adults as previous studies have suggested. The study findings are published in the journal Microbiome. "It's not that the findings of previous studies are wrong, they just didn't adequately control for things like ...

Scientists identify "immune cop" that detects SARS-CoV-2

Scientists identify immune cop that detects SARS-CoV-2
2021-01-12
LA JOLLA, CALIF. - Jan 12, 2020 - Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have identified the sensor in human lungs that detects SARS-CoV-2 and signals that it's time to mount an antiviral response. The study, published today in Cell Reports, provides insights into the molecular basis of severe disease and may enable new strategies for the treatment and prevention of COVID-19. "Our research has shown that MDA-5 is the immune cop that's tasked to keep an eye out for SARS-CoV-2 and call for back-up," says Sumit Chanda, Ph.D., director of the Immunity and Pathogenesis Program at Sanford Burnham Prebys and senior author of ...

Family court decisions distorted by misuse of key research, say experts

2021-01-12
Family courts are misunderstanding and misusing research around how children form close relationships with their caregivers, say an international group of experts. Seventy experts from across the globe argue that widespread misunderstandings around attachment research have hampered its accurate implementation, with potentially negative consequences for decisions in family courts. In response, they have published an international consensus statement in Attachment & Human Development that aims "to counter misinformation and help steer family court applications of attachment theory in a supportive, evidence-based direction on matters related to child protection and custody decisions". In the statement, the group sets out three principles from attachment research ...

Noted experts challenge conventional wisdom within the field of radiology

2021-01-12
Philadelphia, January 12, 2021 - A special issue of the Journal of the American College of Radiology (JACR), published by Elsevier, challenges conventional wisdom across the imaging community. This collection of articles, the "Provocative Issue," presents extreme opinions on pressing issues confronting radiologists with the deliberate aim of sparking positive dialog and debate that will lead to innovative solutions to improve patient care and imaging-related outcomes. The issue is guest-edited by: Caroline Chung, MD, MSc, Director of Advanced ...

Record drop in cancer mortality for second straight year due to improved lung cancer treatment

2021-01-12
ATLANTA - JANUARY 12, 2021 - Overall cancer death rates in the United States dropped continuously from 1991 through 2018 for a total decrease of 31%, including a 2.4% decline from 2017 to 2018. The news comes from the American Cancer Society's annual Cancer Statistics, 2021 article, appearing in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, and its consumer version, Cancer Facts & Figures 2021. This year marks the American Cancer Society's 70th anniversary of reporting this data to inform the nation's fight against cancer. The report estimates that in the U.S. in 2021, almost 1.9 million (1,898,160) new cancer cases will be diagnosed and 608,570 Americans will die from cancer. ...

Fossils' soft tissues helping to solve puzzle that vexed Darwin

Fossils soft tissues helping to solve puzzle that vexed Darwin
2021-01-12
Remarkably well-preserved fossils are helping scientists unravel a mystery about the origins of early animals that puzzled Charles Darwin. Analysis of the 547 million-year-old remains has enabled researchers to trace the ancestry of some of the world's earliest animals further back than ever before. Their study has uncovered the first known link between animals that evolved during the so-called Cambrian Explosion some 540 million-years-ago and one of their early ancestors. Until recently, little was known about the origins of animals that evolved during the Cambrian event because of a lack of well-preserved fossil evidence. The mysterious origins of animals that evolved at this time - when the diversity ...

DiosCURE to develop highly specific single-chain antibodies against SARS-CoV-2

DiosCURE to develop highly specific single-chain antibodies against SARS-CoV-2
2021-01-12
Core technology includes promising bivalent single-domain antibodies simultaneously targeting two surface structures of the viral spike protein. Lead candidates DIOS-202 and DIOS-203 are engineered for high potency and their potential to avoid the emergence of escape mutants. DIOS-202 and DIOS-203 entered into accelerated development to initiate clinical studies later this year. BONN, Germany, January 12, 2021 - DiosCURE SE announced a publication in Science describing its core technology of multivalent single-chain antibodies with a unique molecular mode-of-action to inactivate ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

Childhood cancer survivors are not more likely to terminate their pregnancies

Fine tuning first-responder immune cells may reduce TBI damage

Efficient solid-state depolymerization of waste PET

Women influenced coevolution of dogs and humans

Doctoral student leads paleoclimate study of precipitation and sea ice in Arctic Alaska

Continued strict control measures needed to reduce new COVID-19 strains

The Lancet: World failing to address health needs of 630 million women and children affected by armed conflict

Dramatic changes to radiotherapy treatments due to COVID-19

UTMB team proves potential for reducing pre-term birth by treating fetus as patient

New technique builds super-hard metals from nanoparticles

Regulating the ribosomal RNA production line

ECMO/CRRT in the treatment of critically ill SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia patients

Risk factors for intraoperative pressure injury in aortic surgery

Predictive value of blood pressure, heart rate, and blood pressure/heart rate ratio in a Chinese subpopulation with vasovagal syncope

A method for calculating optimal parameters of liquid chrystal displays developed at RUDN University

No more needles for diagnostic tests?

A professor from RUDN University developed new liquid crystals

Wet and wild: There's lots of water in the world's most explosive volcano

Exercising muscle combats chronic inflammation on its own

From fins to limbs

UK public supports usage of tracking technology and immunity passports in global pandemic

Climate and carbon cycle trends of the past 50 million years reconciled

Crystal structures in super slow motion

University of Cincinnati research unveils possible new combo therapy for head and neck cancer

NSAIDs might exacerbate or suppress COVID-19 depending on timing, mouse study suggests

Tiny particles that seed clouds can form from trace gases over open sea

Experts call for more pragmatic approach to higher education teaching

A quarter of known bee species haven't appeared in public records since the 1990s

AI trained to read electric vehicle charging station reviews to find infrastructure gaps

Genetic sequence for parasitic flowering plant Sapria

[Press-News.org] How many tests after vasectomy? Guideline update leads to change in practice