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Swapping alpha cells for beta cells to treat diabetes

Antibodies that convert glucagon-producing cells into insulin-producing ones cure mouse models of the disease

Swapping alpha cells for beta cells to treat diabetes
2021-03-01
(Press-News.org) Blocking cell receptors for glucagon, the counter-hormone to insulin, cured mouse models of diabetes by converting glucagon-producing cells into insulin producers instead, a team led by UT Southwestern reports in a new study. The END

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Swapping alpha cells for beta cells to treat diabetes

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[Press-News.org] Swapping alpha cells for beta cells to treat diabetes
Antibodies that convert glucagon-producing cells into insulin-producing ones cure mouse models of the disease