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Scientists uncover mutations that make cancer resistant to therapies targeting KRAS

Findings may expand treatment options for patients

2021-04-06
(Press-News.org) BOSTON - A gene called KRAS is one of the most commonly mutated genes in all human cancers, and targeted drugs that inhibit the protein expressed by mutated KRAS have shown promising results in clinical trials, with potential approvals by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration anticipated later this year. Unfortunately, cancer cells often develop additional mutations that make them resistant to such targeted drugs, resulting in disease relapse. Now researchers led by a team at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have identified the first resistance mechanisms that may occur to these drugs and identified strategies to overcome them. The findings are published in END


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[Press-News.org] Scientists uncover mutations that make cancer resistant to therapies targeting KRAS
Findings may expand treatment options for patients