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How has the COVID-19 pandemic impacted peoples' interactions with nature?

How has the COVID-19 pandemic impacted peoples' interactions with nature?
2021-04-07
(Press-News.org) The COVID-19 pandemic and the global response to it have changed many of the interactions that humans have with nature, in both positive and negative ways. A perspective article published in People and Nature considers these changes, discusses the potential long-term consequences, and provides recommendations for further research.

The authors of the article note that the pandemic constitutes a 'global natural experiment' in human-nature interactions that, without seeking to downplay or ignore its tragic consequences, provides a rare opportunity to produce in-depth knowledge about these interactions and to help establish actions that can have positive effects for both humans and nature.

"Although undeniably tragic, the COVID-19 pandemic may offer an invaluable opportunity to explore an appropriate future relationship between people and nature," said lead author Masashi Soga, PhD, of the University of Tokyo.

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How has the COVID-19 pandemic impacted peoples' interactions with nature?

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[Press-News.org] How has the COVID-19 pandemic impacted peoples' interactions with nature?