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The future of biodiversity collections

2021-04-07
(Press-News.org) Events such as the COVID-19 pandemic have highlighted the crucial role played by biodiversity collections in enabling rapid responses to crises and in facilitating ongoing research across numerous fields. Despite the recognized value of this infrastructure, the community nevertheless has further opportunities to maximize its value to the scientific enterprise. Writing in BioScience, Barbara Thiers of the New York Botanical Garden and colleagues describe (https://academic.oup.com/bioscience/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/biosci/biab036) the necessary steps for the biodiversity collections community to vouchsafe its position as an important catalyst of research. The authors draw on recommendations from recent reports by the Biodiversity Collections Network (BCoN) and the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM), arguing that an implementation plan for the previously described Extended Specimen Network (ESN) is a logical next step for the community. According to Thiers and colleagues, the plan should draw on the existing capacity of biodiversity collections to provide researchers with a stable source of research materials, such as those needed to identify the evolution and origin of major pathogens. To undergird the plan, the authors highlight five pillars derived from the NASEM and BCoN reports: collecting new samples, continued digitization, data integration, education and workforce training, and infrastructure and sustainability. With these themes in mind, say the authors, "biodiversity collections data stakeholders can now begin the work of creating a set of action items, a timeline, metrics for measuring success, and an oversight mechanism for the implementation of the ESN by 2030." The authors highlight that a fully implemented ESN will not only be imperative for collections and their users but also for nations seeking to equitably share specimen-derived benefits in compliance with international agreements such as the Nagoya Protocol. Compliance requires careful documentation of specimens and all of their associated records, as well as their use and any benefits derived therefrom. According to the authors, a globally implemented ESN will enable compliance by providing data transparency and maintaining critical records of specimen use and chain of custody. Thiers and colleagues argue that it is imperative that the ESN be global in its scope. Only through broad international collaboration will it be possible to "develop a comprehensive, permanent federation of all biological collections that fulfills their mission to represent past and present life forms for scientific discovery, wise environmental policy, and a scientifically literate citizenry."

INFORMATION:

BioScience, published monthly by Oxford Journals, is the journal of the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS). BioScience is a forum for integrating the life sciences that publishes commentary and peer-reviewed articles. The journal has been published since 1964. AIBS is an organization for professional scientific societies and organizations, and individuals, involved with biology. AIBS provides decision-makers with high-quality, vetted information for the advancement of biology and society. Follow BioScience on Twitter @AIBSbiology.

Oxford Journals is a division of Oxford University Press. Oxford Journals publishes well over 300 academic and research journals covering a broad range of subject areas, two-thirds of which are published in collaboration with learned societies and other international organizations. The division has been publishing journals for more than a century, and as part of the world's oldest and largest university press, has more than 500 years of publishing expertise behind it. Follow Oxford Journals on Twitter @OxfordJournals.



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[Press-News.org] The future of biodiversity collections