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Changes in physician work Hours, patterns during COVID-19

JAMA Network Open

2021-06-23
(Press-News.org) What The Study Did: The hours worked and patterns of work activities among U.S. physicians before and during the COVID-19 pandemic were examined in this study.

Authors: Xiaochu Hu, Ph.D., of the Association of American Medical Colleges in Washington, D.C., is the corresponding author.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

(doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2021.14386)

Editor's Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, conflict of interest and financial disclosures, and funding and support.

INFORMATION:

Media advisory: The full study is linked to this news release.

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About JAMA Network Open:
JAMA Network Open is the new online-only open access general medical journal from the JAMA Network. On weekdays, the journal publishes peer-reviewed clinical research and commentary in more than 40 medical and health subject areas. Every article is free online from the day of publication.



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[Press-News.org] Changes in physician work Hours, patterns during COVID-19
JAMA Network Open