PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

Women working rotating shifts especially likely to be frail, York study finds

2023-03-17
(Press-News.org)

March 17, 2023, TORONTO —  A new study led by researchers at York University has found a link between shift work and frailty among middle-aged and older workers in Canada, especially for women on rotating shifts. 

While there is a large body of research suggesting the disruptions to circadian rhythms that shift workers experience are linked to various illnesses, this study was the first to take a comprehensive or “holistic” look at the connection between shift work and frailty. 

“We cannot ignore the negative health outcomes related to shift work, including cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, stroke and certain cancers,” says York Faculty of Health PhD student Durdana Khan, a trainee with the York Centre for Aging and Research and Education. “Our study is the first to investigate the relationship between shift work and frailty for middle-age and older adults.” 

For the study, which will be published in the May edition of the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Khan, along with York professors Heather Edgell, Hala Tamim and Michael Rotondi, and immunologist and epidemiologist Chris Verschoor of the Health Sciences North Research Institute, looked at 48,000 participants across Canada from the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging and followed up at three years to measure for frailty. 

Frailty is defined as someone’s likelihood towards disease and death. The researchers used an index that looks at 52 factors that can likely lower lifespan, including depression, osteoarthritis, history of heart attacks and mobility issues. Mildly frail people are considered those that have at least five factors. Having at least 11 factors would put people in the ‘very frail’ category. 

The study found one in five adult Canadians were involved in shift work, defined as work that falls outside of a nine-to-five schedule. People who had a history of shift work had a higher likelihood of frailty compared to people who only worked daytime hours. More than one in four were found to be mildly frail, and seven per cent were very frail. Women whose longest job consisted of rotating shift work were especially likely to be considered frail, with more than 31 per cent falling in the mildly frail category and nearly 11 per cent classified as very frail.

Circadian rhythms are moderated by sunlight exposure. When sunlight hits the eyes, signals are sent to the pineal gland in the brain – triggering certain hormones and responses that regulate alertness, mood and appetite, and a lack of light sets off other responses. In shift workers, this process is dysregulated, and research suggests this disruption can contribute to a host of health issues.  

“Although these findings are preliminary, they suggest that circadian disruption may play an important role in frailty, and this warrants further investigation,” says Khan. 

This latest study builds on Khan and Edgell’s earlier research that suggests that shift work may be linked to delayed menopause. 

“The circadian rhythm influences your brain's ability to control your hormones, which can influence your menopause,” explains Edgell. “So, there are a lot of physiological changes that can occur because of shift work.”

While women were more likely to be frail, health research overall shows women to be more resilient to succumbing to disease than men, so this study does not necessarily suggest higher mortality. Still, it does point to sex-based differences that would be important to consider as more women do work outside a nine-to-five schedule, says Khan, who adds that keeping on top of exercise and nutrition can combat some of the negative effects. 

“We can’t make shift work go away, but we can reverse frailty to a degree,” she concludes. 

Watch a video of Khan explaining the research.

 

-30-

 

York University is a modern, multi-campus, urban university located in Toronto, Ontario. Backed by a diverse group of students, faculty, staff, alumni and partners, we bring a uniquely global perspective to help solve societal challenges, drive positive change, and prepare our students for success. York's fully bilingual Glendon Campus is home to Southern Ontario's Centre of Excellence for French Language and Bilingual Postsecondary Education. York’s campuses in Costa Rica and India offer students exceptional transnational learning opportunities and innovative programs. Together, we can make things right for our communities, our planet, and our future. 

 

Media Contact: 

Emina Gamulin, York University Media Relations, 437-217-6362, egamulin@yorku.ca

END



ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

Argonne hosts conference for undergraduate women in physics

Argonne hosts conference for undergraduate women in physics
2023-03-17
The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory hosted an American Physical Society (APS) Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics (CUWiP) on Jan. 20-22. The conference series, sponsored by DOE and the National Science Foundation, is designed to support undergraduate women and gender minorities in physics by connecting them with resources, community, information on graduate school and professionals in their field. It also provides students with access to other women in physics with whom they can share experiences, advice and ideas. The January 2023 event is one of 14 APS CUWiP events hosted across the country and ...

How can we tackle the biggest challenges? Ask a plant

How can we tackle the biggest challenges? Ask a plant
2023-03-17
LOS ALAMOS, N.M., March 16, 2023 — Without plants, we’d have no air to breathe or food to eat, yet plant science lingers in the shadowy wings while other fields take center stage. With the goal of shining the spotlight on plants, a new study presents the field’s top 100 most pressing questions for research to address the greatest challenges facing humanity. “The study highlights the importance of plant science for society by laying out myriad questions and technical challenges ...

Genes shed light on why men and women experience different depression symptoms

2023-03-17
Depression is widely reported to be more common in women than in men, with women twice as likely to receive a diagnosis than men. A new sex-specific study from McGill University has found that there are differences between male and female genes and how they relate to depression. In a study of more than 270,000 individuals, the researchers found that sex-specific prediction methods were more accurate in forecasting an individual’s genetic risk of developing depression than prediction methods that did not specify sex. The researchers found ...

Breaking barriers in hepatitis C diagnosis and treatment for populations at risk

Breaking barriers in hepatitis C diagnosis and treatment for populations at risk
2023-03-17
A study with people who inject drugs evaluated a minimally invasive test based on dried blood spots (DBS) for the monitoring of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The use of DBS samples for HCV RNA detection and genotyping was shown to effectively assess cure after treatment and to differentiate between reinfection and treatment failure. The results support the viability of decentralizing treatment and post-treatment monitoring for people who inject drugs, who frequently face challenges accessing the healthcare system. The study, which has been published in the Journal of Medical Virology, was carried out as part of a project with support from the "Conquering ...

UMass Amherst providing 30 three-year scholarships to boost diversity in mathematics and statistics

UMass Amherst providing 30 three-year scholarships to boost diversity in mathematics and statistics
2023-03-17
AMHERST, Mass. – University of Massachusetts Amherst’s Department of Mathematics and Statistics is offering 30 three-year scholarships to a diverse cohort of students majoring in mathematics and statistics, thanks to a $1.5 million dollar grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF). The six-year project, called Enhancing Underrepresented Participation in Mathematics & Statistics: Mentoring from Junior to Master’s, will welcome its first cohort in the Fall of 2023, and will support each student for their junior and senior years, as well as through a one-year master’s program. The program will accept ...

Carbon nanotube films as ultrasensitive photodetectors: progress and challenges

Carbon nanotube films as ultrasensitive photodetectors: progress and challenges
2023-03-17
Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) are being used to develop a third generation of optimized shortwave infrared photodetectors that will improve pixel size, weight, power consumption, performance and cost over photodetectors made from traditional materials.   Ultrasensitive shortwave infrared photodetectors, which detect a subset of shortwave infrared light wavelengths outside of the visual spectrum, have many potential applications, including night surveillance, navigation during poor weather conditions, fiber optic communications and semiconductor quality control.  Shortwave ...

Mountain forests are being lost at an accelerating rate, putting biodiversity at risk

Mountain forests are being lost at an accelerating rate, putting biodiversity at risk
2023-03-17
More than 85% of the world’s bird, mammal, and amphibian species live in mountains,  particularly in forest habitats, but researchers report in the journal One Earth on March 17 that these forests are disappearing at an accelerating rate. Globally, we have lost 78.1 million hectares (7.1%) of mountain forest since 2000—an area larger than the size of Texas. Much of the loss occurred in tropical biodiversity hotspots, putting increasing pressure on threatened species. Though their rugged location once protected mountain forests from deforestation, they have been increasingly exploited since the turn of ...

River deltas: Valuable and under threat

2023-03-17
The livelihoods of millions of people who live in river deltas, among the world’s most productive lands, are at risk. Created where large rivers meet the ocean and deposit their natural sediment load, river deltas are often just a few meters above sea level. And while they make up less than 0.5 % of the world’s land area, river deltas contribute more than 4 % of the global GDP, 3% of global crop production, and are home to 5.5 % of the world’s population. All of these values are highly vulnerable to imminent global environmental change, according to a new Stanford University-led study. “It is often not rising seas, but sinking land due to human activities that ...

Few Medicaid-participating primary care physicians providing longer-acting birth control methods

2023-03-17
WASHINGTON (March 17, 2023)— Medicaid beneficiaries face barriers in accessing medical care – and that includes contraceptive care. A new study finds that despite birth control being an essential health service, all primary care physicians that see them may not be offering Medicaid patients some of the most effective, longer-acting birth control methods. While nearly half (48%) of primary care physicians who treat Medicaid patients provided prescription contraception like the birth control pill, only 10% provided longer-acting methods like IUDs ...

Association of household opioid availability with opioid overdose

2023-03-17
About The Study: In this study of Oregon residents in households of at least two members, the findings suggest that household prescription availability is associated with increased odds of opioid overdose for others in the household, even if they do not have their own opioid prescription. These findings underscore the importance of educating patients about proper opioid disposal and the risks of household opioids.  Authors: Michelle A. Hendricks, Ph.D., of Comagine Health in Portland, Oregon, is the corresponding ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

Quantum computing will radically alter the application of copyright law, study says

Ochsner Health & Wellness Day in New Orleans East set for March 9

Protecting joints from bacteria with mussels

Researchers investigate immune response of a man who received 217 Covid vaccinations

Proceed with caution – the meteoric rise of zero-alcohol drinks

USC collaborates with startup supporter Techstars to encourage intellectual property development

Who military service members see as credible to discuss secure firearm storage for suicide prevention

Low birthweight coupled with overweight in 20s linked with ‘massive risk’ of early type 2 diabetes in men

DNA aptamer drug sensors can instantly detect cocaine, heroin and fentanyl – even when combined with other drugs

New project will use next-gen at-home rapid test to track COVID-19, RSV, and flu

SRI relaunches the PARC Forum event series as it celebrates the first anniversary of acquiring the storied Palo Alto Research Center

An inside look at Beech tree disease

New AI model draws treasure maps to diagnose disease

Breastfeeding after COVID-19 booster can give babies antibodies

Researchers closing in on genetic treatments for hereditary lung disease, vision loss

COVID-19 associated with increased risk for autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases up to a year after infection

UC Irvine receives $15 million NSF grant for integrative movement research

University of Houston engineer Metin Akay featured in study highlighting 50 scientists' contributions to biomedical engineering advancements

JWST captures the end of planet formation

Good news—MS drugs taken while breastfeeding may not affect child development

Programs intended to reduce health insurance premiums may make coverage less affordable for the middle class

PrEP discontinuation in a US national cohort of sexual and gender minority populations, 2017–22

USC Study: Medicare Part D plans increased restrictions on drug coverage

Sacituzumab govitecan plus platinum-based chemotherapy in breast, bladder, and lung carcinomas

Global study unveils "problematic" use of porn

Newly discovered protein prevents DNA triplication

Less ice in the arctic ocean has complex effects on marine ecosystems and ocean productivity

Antarctica’s coasts are becoming less icy

New research shows migrating animals learn by experience

Modeling the origins of life: New evidence for an “RNA World”

[Press-News.org] Women working rotating shifts especially likely to be frail, York study finds